Sunday in Trumpland

 

Trump Barry

Things seem to be business as usual in Trumpland.

Last night we learned that Donald Trump’s sister, retired federal judge Maryanne Trump Barry, had some choice things to say about her brother. Let’s be clear. She didn’t say anything that we didn’t already know about this president.

Readers of this blog might be interested in Maryanne Barry’s comments about the president’s political base: “All he wants to do is appeal to his base. He has no principles. None. None. And his base, I mean my God, if you were a religious person, you want to help people. Not do this.”

The White House released a statement regarding the comments made by the president’s sister. It read: “Every day it’s something else, who cares. I miss my brother, and I’ll continue to work hard for the American people. Not everyone agrees, but the results are obvious. Our country will soon be stronger than ever before.”

It is the eve of the Republican National Convention and the convention website has very little information about what is going to happen. We do, however, finally have a list of speakers. The Trump family will be filling a significant number of speaking slots.

U.S. Senators speaking include Tim Scott, Rand Paul, Marsha Blackburn, Joni Ernst, Mitch McConnell, and Tom Cotton. Some GOP Senators with national reputations will not be speaking. This list includes Lamar Alexander, Susan Collins, John Cornyn, Ted Cruz, Lindsay Graham, Chuck Grassley, Josh Hawley, Jim Inhofe, James Lankford, Mike Lee, John Kennedy, Kelly Loeffler, Martha McSally, Lisa Murkowski, Mitt Romney, Marco Rubio, Ben Sasse, and Rick Scott.

Speakers from the House of Representatives include Steve Scalise, Matt Gaetz, Jim Jordan, Dan Crenshaw, Elise Stefanik, Lee Zeldin, Kevin McCarthy, and Jeff Van Drew.

Others noteworthy speakers include former U.N. ambassador Nikki Haley, Donald Trump Jr.’s girlfriend (and former Fox News pundit) Kimberly Guilfoyle, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds, South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem, Trump staffer Kellyanne Conway, Eric Trump’s wife Lana Trump, and Rudy Giuliani.

There are also several speakers who represent our nation’s ongoing culture wars. They include court evangelical Franklin Graham, Covington Catholic High School student Nicholas Sandman, court evangelical Charlie Kirk, and the St. Louis’s gun wielding couple Mark and Patricia McCloskey.

Trump is still tweeting about God.

He is still obsessed with the pledge of allegiance:

For a full treatment of what happened read this post from yesterday.

Trump had another tweet today about God:

This tweet, of course, is a blatant attempt to win the votes of evangelicals in November. But it also tells us what Trump really thinks about evangelicals. He believes that we will gravitate to any political candidate who mentions the name of God. We will blindly follow the sound of the “We want God” mantra–like zombies–into the voting booth. Sadly, this may actually be the case for many of my fellow evangelicals.

The court evangelicals seem to welcome Trump’s appeal to his base. This morning a megachurch pastor in California turned his pulpit over to Charlie Kirk of Liberty University’s Falkirk Center:

I wonder what Kirk will say. Perhaps some of his most recent tweets (last 24 hours) will make it into his Lord’s Day sermon:

Liberty University Falkirk Center fellow Jenna Ellis loves Trump’s tweet about God:

Self-pointed prophet Lance Wallnau is still talking about Kamala Harris as a “Jezebel” (and hawking a book).

 

Court evangelical journalist David Brody believes Trump is the only biblical candidate:

I am curious about what Brody means by “traditional biblical policy positions.” Most evangelicals didn’t really see abortion as a political issue until the mid-1970s.

Robert Jeffress was on Fox News this morning.

First, he seems to believe that one can “remove God” from public life. It this theological possible? I think most evangelicals, myself included, believe God is bigger that this.

Second, Jeffress also ignores the fact that the Pledge of Allegiance was recited every night at the DNC convention with the phrase “under God” included. But why would the pastor bring this up when he can twist the truth for political advantage?

Third, Jeffress implies that people of faith in the Democratic Party are not true Christians.

Fourth, Jeffress continues to promote this idea that abortion is the only political issue evangelicals should be concerned about. Perhaps he should read conservative evangelical David French’s column today in which he challenges this idea.

Watch:

Stay tuned. Classes start this week at Messiah University, but I still hope there is time to watch the GOP convention and write a few words.

What are the court evangelicals saying about day 3 of the DNC convention?

Trump Court Evangelicals 2

Last night we heard from Hillary Clinton, Elizabeth Warren, Barack Obama, and Kamala Harris. So what are the court evangelicals saying?

Johnnie Moore, the man who describes himself as a “modern-day Dietrich Bonhoeffer“:

Moore tweeted the above Bible verse while Barack Obama was speaking last night.

On Monday night, as the DNC was talking about “rising up” for social, economic, environmental, and racial justice, Moore tweeted this:

It is worth noting that Psalm 20 also says “Some trust in chariots and some in horses, but we trust in the name of the Lord our God.”

This is unrelated to the convention, but one court evangelical will no longer have a TBN television show.

Charlie Kirk continues to represent the Falkirk Center at Liberty University:

How long will Liberty University allow this to go on? Charlie Kirk will continue to spew this kind of stuff as long as evangelical churches, schools, and Christians give him a platform.

Here is Liberty University Falkirk Center fellow Sebastian Gorka:

Court evangelical Lance Wallnau is on the Eric Metaxas Show. Wallnau claims that he prophesied the idea of “Trump derangement syndrome” He continues with his “Hillary 2.0″ theory about Kamala Harris. He once again claims that Harris is a “chameleon” with a “Jezebel spirit” who has been “vetted” not by Biden, but by the devil. Metaxas calls her an “evil protean figure.” He adds that if Biden wins in November it will be “the end of America.”

At the end of the interview, Wallnau and Metaxas engage in some serious “America as a New Israel” language. Metaxas says that we have abandoned God’s “covenant” with America established by the Pilgrims. in 1620 and the patriots in 1776. This is all very bad American history and theology, but it’s the kind of message Metaxas (along with David Barton) has been pitching for a long time now. Take a look at my review of his book If You Can Keep It.

Court evangelical: Kamala Harris has a “Jezebel spirit” and is a satanic “chameleon” secretly working as an “Obama surrogate”

Lance-Wallnau

Early in the 2016 presidential campaign, Lance Wallnau, a leading figure in the Independent Network Charismatic (INC) movement, received a word from God: “Donald Trump is a wrecking ball to the spirit of political correctness.”

When Wallnau’s prophecy caught the attention of Trump’s evangelical supporters, he was invited to attend a meeting with the candidate and other evangelical leaders in Trump Tower. As Wallnau listened to Trump talk about his desire to give evangelicals a more prominent voice in government, he sensed that God was giving him an “assignment”–a “calling related to this guy.”

One day, while Wallnau was reading his Facebook page, he saw a meme predicting that Trump would be the “45th president of the United States.” God told Wallnau to pick up his Bible and turn to Isaiah 45. On reading the passage, Wallnau realized that, not only would Trump be a “wrecking ball” to political correctness, but he would be elected president of the United States in the spirit of the ancient Persian king Cyrus. In the Old Testament, Cyrus was the secular political leader whom God used to send the exiled kingdom of Judah back to the Promised Land so that they could rebuild the city of Jerusalem and its holy Temple. Wallnau was shocked by this discovery. “God was messing with my head,” he told Steven Strang, the editor of Charisma, a magazine that covers INC and other Pentecostal and charismatic movement (and claims a circulation of over 275,000).

From this point forward, Wallnau would become an outspoken supporter of Donald Trump.  He has made appearances on Christian Right radio and television programs to tell his story about he prophesied Trump’s election. Some of you remember when he  hawked $45.00 King Cyrus prayer coins on the Jim Bakker Show.

Here is he is on the Eric Metaxas Show talking about “a guy from Messiah College.”

In his most recent Facebook video, Wallnau had some choice things to say about Joe Biden’s running mate. Here is Kyle Mantyla at Right Wing Watch:

Wallnau asserted that Harris is “not intelligent” but simply possesses an ability to deceive people, which is why she was chosen to serve as Joe Biden’s running mate by the “deep state” and “do what [Barack] Obama wants her to do, which is to undo Trump’s legacy.” He added that Harris is driven by a “Jezebel spirit,” which some evangelicals believe is an evil and cunning demonic female spirit intent on attacking God and those who worship him.

Watch the video:

You can watch the entire thing here. If you can’t watch it, here is what you missed:

  • Kamala Harris is a “chameleon.”
  • The “devil” is going to try to use Harris to “take Trump out.”
  • The “Wuhan China” is connected to a vision Wallnau saw of “President Harris.”
  • Satan released the virus to take down Trump.
  • The spirit of the “false prophet” is working with the media to make Harris look more moderate, but she is really an “Obama’s surrogate.”
  • “God never really intended that Donald Trump would not be there for this next term.”
  • Wallnau admits a version of the “fear thesis” when he says the voted “out of anxiety” and elected Trump, but then the church went back to “business as usual” without realizing the “apocalyptic cliff-hanger” it is in.
  • Evangelical Christian pastors and leaders who say that they will merely hold their noses and vote for Trump in 2020 are weak. They should be openly campaigning for him.
  • If we pray hard enought, God will intervene on behalf of Trump between now and November.

More than 260,000 people have watched this video. Some have even responded to it with comments like these:

–I just seen you tonight and what a Blessing, telling it like it was and is and is to come! I will be following you cause I like what I’m hearing and your my new brother in the Lord and Family of God! Thanks for sharing.

–Kamala Harris I read about her religious faith it is not Christian it is an ancient Egyptian faith just remember that when the Pharaoh put his dead son on Satan’s arm trying to bring him back to life it did not happen God will win the devil will not.

We must fight with prayer. God have mercy on our land and President Trump. Grant us mercy one more time Lord, heal our land. In Jesus name.

–I think she is a witch

–I can’t stand to hear all of this!! We must vote so these things will not happen. The enemy is not on the throne. God still reigns.

–Chameleon Harris….she’s slippery, scaly and has horns 🦎 changes colors according to her agenda.

–I have never listened to you before so I find amazing that what you said about Kamala is exactly what I said to my husband last night. Binding together in prayer and praise through Jesus name.

–Thank you. I appreciate your bold truth and not trying to protect a tax exempt status in a time as this.We need voices bold as a lion like you.God bless you in Jesus name.

–“Extraordinary surprises and interventions! Spiritually radioactive Christians around all the people engaged in this political contest!” Show us how to do the work you have called us to do!

–They will want to take your guns

–Mental manipulation to wear mask, take vaccine ….

–Amen!! Pray and vote like Jesus would! Trump 2020

–The dems have stocks in the mask companies. They want there money.

Those ensconced in their cosmopolitan enclaves need to take this stuff seriously. Wallnau and the INC influence, as scholars Brad Christerson and Richard Flory have shown, runs deep in conservative political circles in the United States and around the world.

Monday night court evangelical roundup

Court Evangelicals at Table

What have Trump’s evangelicals been saying since our last update?

James Robison does not like the “anti-God” mindset in our country:

I am guessing here that Robison does not see any direct connection between the POTUS he supports and the “father of lies” mentioned in this tweet. How could a man with decades of ministry experience be so deceived?

Jentezen Franklin is preaching about honor. One of Merriam-Webster’s definition of honor is “a keen sense of ethical conduct: integrity.

Shouldn’t church leaders be concerned about coronavirus spreading in churches as well as beaches and open-air demonstrations? My Pennsylvania evangelical church is requiring masks. Jeffress’s church is “strongly encouraging” masks.

Eric Metaxas is once again hosting John Zmirak, a writer at James Robison’s website The Stream. Zmirak is equating Black Lives Matter to the Antichrist and claiming that God gave him this idea. Metaxas wastes no time invoking Godwin’s law.

Charlie Kirk of Liberty University’s Falkirk Center still doesn’t understand the purpose of masks. By the way, he gets paid a lot of money to write tweets like this:

Lance Wallnau is really excited about Trump’s pardon of Roger Stone.

This will be the last daily court evangelical roundup for a while. I need a break.

Tuesday night court evangelical roundup

COurt Evangelicals

What have Trump’s evangelicals been saying since yesterday’s update?

Franklin Graham is on the stump for Trump. This is from his Facebook page :

In the last presidential election in 2016, I reminded people across the country that the election was not about Donald Trump’s previous lifestyle or Hillary Clinton’s lost emails, but it was about the courts—Who do you trust to appoint conservative judges to the courts? Donald J. Trump won the election, and in the next few days he will be making his 200th judicial appointment. That’s more than any president in the last four decades during the same time frame. Thank you Mr. President! This will be a legacy that truly will keep on giving—in the lives of our children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren.

And Twitter:

Al Mohler is questioning science and COVID-19 experts and promoting a Trumpian populism:

Charlie Kirk is running a “Students for Trump” convention in Arizona featuring Donald Trump.

A few observations:

  • In the opening prayer of this convention, the minister thanked God that “All Lives Matter.” The prayer was filled with Christian nationalism, law and order, and Trump talking points. The crowd cheered during the prayer at the appropriate points.
  • Ryan Fournier, the founder of Students for Trump, calls the event “the most aggressive political outreach movement in political presidential campaign history.” Wow!  That’s specific.
  • Florida Matt Gaetz spoke. So did Donald Trump Jr.
  • Trump said nothing new to the 2000 students who showed-up. It was just another campaign rally.

Eric Metaxas interviews one of his “mentors in terms of thinking of race in America,” conservative talk show host Larry Elder. Elder talks about his new documentary film “Uncle Tom.” Elder makes the common claim that the Democrats opposed the 13th Amendment (ending slavery), 14th Amendment (equal protection under the law for African.Americans), and 15th Amendment (African American right to vote). This is largely true, but he fails to consider that the Democratic Party of the 1860s and 1870s is not the Democratic Party of today. See Princeton historian Kevin Kruse’s debate (if you can all it that) with conservative pundit Dinesh D’Souza. This entire argument ignores a fundamental element of historical thinking: change over time. Metaxas totally endorses Elder’s approach, claiming that Americans “don’t know the facts.” Elder and Metaxas are peddling some really bad history here.

Elder claims that racism “is no longer a problem” in American life. This reminds me of a family member who recently told me that I was “living in the past” by suggesting that the history of racial discrimination in America might have something to do with race in America today.

In his second hour, Metaxas and his crew argue that the division in the country is the work of Satan, “the accuser.” Metaxas has the audacity to say that Satan “takes things that are true and twists them into a lie.” Wait, I thought Metaxas supported Trump! 🙂

Metaxas wants a view of history that celebrates all that is good in America. He extols all the Bible-believing Christians who were abolitionists. Yes, this is true. There were many good Christians who fought against slavery. But the present always shapes how we think about the past. As the country is trying to come to grips with racism–both individual acts of racism and the deeper problem of systemic racism–now is the time to take a deep, hard look at how we got here. That will mean taking a hard look at the dark moments of the white evangelical past. This is not the time to get defensive and engage in whataboutism. (Hey, what about Harriet Beecher Stowe!).

Metaxas then interviews Jenna Ellis of the Liberty University Falkirk Center.  In this interview, Metaxas says that “the only reason we abolished slavery is because of the Bible.” This is not entirely true, as I argued in Believe Me.  Slaveholding southerners actually used the Bible to justify slavery and accused northern abolitionists of not being biblical enough. As multiple historians have shown, the Bible was used to fortify racial discrimination to a much greater extent than the Bible was used to end slavery or advance racial justice in America. But Metaxas doesn’t care about that. He needs a usable past. Everything else can be conveniently ignored.

Speaking of the Falkirk Center at Liberty University:

And Lance Wallnau brings the fearmongering:

Until next time.

Tuesday Night Court Evangelical Roundup

Court evangelical prayer in Miami

What have Trump’s evangelicals been saying since yesterday’s update?

We already mentioned what Robert Jeffress said today about the “weak” evangelicals who are questioning their support of Donald Trump.

He also did an interview with the alt-Right website Breitbart.

Breitbart · Breitbart News Sunday – Robert Jeffress – June 7, 2020

Here is Jeffress: “First of all, let me just point out the obvious truth that Dr. Martin Luther King was a pastor who got involved in politics. We hear today all the time, ‘Well, pastors shouldn’t get involved in politics. Christians shouldn’t get involved in politics.’”

I am not going to respond to this here, but I wrote about it in the final chapter of Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump. The bottom-line is this: King spoke truth to power. Jeffress bows to it.

Jeffress goes on: “Were it not for pastors, there would have been no civil rights movement…If it were not for pastors getting involved in politics, there would have been no abolition of slavery. If it were not for pastors getting involved in politics, there wouldn’t have been any American Revolution.”

We are all political. No argument here. Ministers of all kinds are involved in political work. I like Glenn Tinder’s definition: “Politics is the activity through which men and women survey the historical conditions they inhabit.” Politics requires attentiveness and availability. Attentiveness requires us to know what people are doing, suffering, and saying. Availability asks, “is there anything I can do about it?” As citizens of the Kingdom of God, Christians are always engaged in political activity.  This then raises an important question: Are we engaging politically according to the ethics of the Kingdom to which we belong and hold citizenship?

Jeffress goes on: “It was the Black-Robed Regiment, a group of pastors, who led the way in the American Revolution. These did so by peaceful protesting, and there’s everything right with peaceful protesting. Many times, peaceful protests are the antecedents to needed reform like the abolition of slavery, like the civil rights movement.”

This is completely wrong. Read this post.

Eric Metaxas is re-running the last five minutes of an interview with his Liberty University Falkirk Center colleague Charlie Kirk in which they trash the idea of white privilege.

Then he and Victor Davis Hansen spin a crazy theory about the French Revolution and the American Revolution. Metaxas says that these two competing visions of revolution could lead to a civil war. He is essentially making the same argument Os Guinness made a few weeks ago. Hanson should stick to writing about ancient military history. Metaxas should stop doing American history. Here is what happened the last time he tried.

(I should also add that the idea of “decolonizing” one’s personal library seems just as crazy).

Ralph Reed is praising an op-ed piece by Trump’s campaign manager:

Lance Wallnau believes right-wing commentator Candace Owens is an “Oracle”:

I think the use of the words “defund the police” is a terrible slogan. First, it does not truly represent what is really meant by this kind of reform. Second, it plays right into Trump’s politics of fear. Here is Franklin Graham playing to the fears of white evangelical voters:

Johnnie Moore, the guy who wants everyone to know he is a “modern Dietrich Bonhoeffer, is getting-out the vote for Trump along with Samuel Rodriguez, and Jenetzen Franklin. Mike Huckabee is also involved.

Until next time.

Why a $45.00 Prayer Coin is Actually a Bargain for Trump Followers

trump_cyrus_coin_jim_bakker_twitter

Here is a taste of my piece today at Religion News Service:

For centuries, Catholics have used rosary beads to aid them in the practice of prayer.  Some American Protestants view their Bibles as a kind of talisman or amulet that transmits supernatural power.

And today some American charismatic Christians pray using a coin emblazoned with a picture of Donald Trump.

On Monday (May 13), a charismatic preacher named Lance Wallnau appeared on the program of disgraced televangelist Jim Bakker to hawk a Donald Trump/King Cyrus gold coin.

He claimed that the coin can be used as a “point of contact” between Christians and God as they pray for the re-election of Trump in 2020.

Bakker’s show, which is syndicated daily on his PTL (Praise the Lord) Television Network, is known for selling his viewers products to help them survive the coming apocalypse. With the click of a mouse, a Christian who wants to prepare for the end of the world can buy buckets of freeze-dried food (the “30 Day Fiesta” Bucket appears to be popular), duffel bags that can withstand electromagnetic pulse attacks, flashlights and generators.

Wallnau and Bakker are selling the Trump/Cyrus coin for $45, but charismatic Christian viewers — many of whom identify as evangelical — can also drop $450 on a “13 Trump Cyrus Bundle” that includes 13 sets of the coin, the booklet explaining the connection between Trump and the former Persian king and the DVD of Wallnau conducting a religious service.

Read the rest here.

Evangelical Trump Fans: Don’t Forget to Buy Your King Cyrus-Donald Trump Prayer Coin

Cyrus-Trump-Coin-2019-2.png

In Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump, I wrote a several pages on the so-called INC (Independent Network Charismatics) prophets.  Lance Wallnau is one of these “prophets.”  Here is what I wrote about him:

Early in the 2016 campaign, Lance Wallnau received a similar word: “Donald Trump is a wrecking ball to the spirit of political correctness.”  When Wallnau’s prophecy caught the attention of Trump’s evangelical supporters, he was invited to attend a meeting with the candidate and other evangelical leaders in Trump Tower.  As Wallnau listened to Trump talk about his desire to give evangelicals a more prominent voice in government, he sensed that God was giving him an “assignment”–a “calling related to this guy.”  One day, while he was reading his Facebook page, Wallnau saw a meme predicting that Trump would be the “45 president of the United States.”  God told Wallnau to pick up his Bible and turn to Isaiah 45.  On reading the passage, Wallnau realized that, not only would Trump be a “wrecking ball” to political correctness, but he would be elected president of the United States in the spirit of the ancient Persian king Cyrus.  In the Old Testament, Cyrus  was the secular political leader whom God used to send the exiled kingdom of Judah back to the Promised Land so that they could rebuild the city of Jerusalem and its holy Temple.  Wallnau was shocked by this discovery.  “God was messing with my head,” he told Steven Strang, the editor of Charisma, a magazine that covers INC and other Pentecostal and charismatic movements….From this point forward, Wallnau would become an outspoken supporter of Donald Trump.

Recently Wallnau showed-up on the Jim Bakker television program to hawk his Cyrus-Trump prayer coins.  According to this piece at Esquire magazine, Wallnau said that the coin is the “point of contact” between God and people praying for Trump’s success.  And guess what? This coin can be yours for only $45.00.  Here is Jack Holmes at Esquire:

This truly is the Golden Age of Grifting, and the nation’s Evangelical leaders have not passed up the opportunity. The “White Evangelical Christian” designation has always been a proxy for traditionalists who believe America’s rightful social order is the racial and gender hierarchy of approximately 1956. Donald Trump has merely laid this bare by earning their support despite being the most comically heathen man to ever step foot in the White House. What principles of Jesus Christ does the president embody? The better question might be which of the Seven Deadly Sins—pride, greed, lust, envy, gluttony, wrath and sloth—does he not  represent? It’s all part of the Great Unvarnishing, as the acidity of Trump’s public persona has worn on the top coat of paint many people have applied to themselves, gradually exposing what lies beneath. It’s not about Christian Values, it’s about money and power. Unless it’s about something else.

And for those Trump evangelical supporters with deeper pockets, you can get an entire “Cyrus Trump Bundle.”  It includes the Cyrus-Trump coin, a booklet by Wallnau describing his prophecy, and DVD of Wallnau conducting a religious service.  It’s yours for $450.

As I argued in Believe Me, the Independent Network Charismatics are a very large, growing, and largely overlooked segment of American evangelicalism.  Wallnau is one of their leaders.

“They had a guy from Messiah College”

This is a fascinating conversation between two court evangelicalsEric Metaxas and Lance Wallnau. Thanks to Peter Montgomery from Right Wing Watch for calling it to my attention.

Here is the entire conversation:

We have spent a lot of time covering Metaxas here at The Way of Improvement Leads Home, but some of you may be unfamiliar with Wallnau.  Here is what I wrote about him in Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump:

The second major stream of court evangelicalism flows from Independent Network Charismatic (INC) Christianity.  According to scholars Brad Christerson and Richard Flory, INC is the fastest-growing Christian movement in both the Western world and the global South.  INC Christians are outside the network of traditional Pentecostals.  While they embrace many of the so-called gifts of the Holy Spirit (tongues-speaking, prophecy, healing, miracles), they do not affiliate with traditional Pentecostal denominations such as the Assemblies of God, the Church of God in Christ, the International Foursquare Gospel Church, or the Church of God (Cleveland, TN).  In fact, the INC movement is not a denomination; instead, it is a network of strong spiritual leaders, scattered across the globe, with very large followings.  Like the so-called Latter Rain movement that infiltrated traditional Pentecostalism in the 1940s and 1950s, INC leaders believe that a great revival of the Holy Spirit will take place shortly before the Second Coming of Jesus Christ, and God will raise up apostles and prophets to lead this revival.  These new spiritual leaders will have authority that comes directly from God, not from denominations or congregations. Some of the more prominent INC prophets, all of whom believe that we are currently living in the midst of this great Holy Spirit revival, include Che Ahn (Harvest International Ministries in Pasadena, CA), Bill Johnson (Bethel Church in Redding, CA), Chuck Pierce (Glory of Zion Ministries in Corinth, TX), Cindy Jacobs (General International in Red Oak, TX), Mike Bickle (International House of Prayer in Kansas City, MO), Lou Engle (The Call in Colorado Springs, CO), Dutch Sheets (Dutch Sheets Ministries in Dallas, TX), and Lance Wallnau (Lance Learning Group in Dallas, TX).

INC prophets and apostles believe that they have been anointed to serve God’s agents in ushering in his future kingdom, a process that many describe as God “bringing heaven to earth.”  They are thus deeply attracted to Seven Mountain Dominionism, the belief that Jesus will not return until society comes under the dominion of Jesus Christ.  Drawing from Isaiah 2:2 (“Now it shall come to pass in the latter days that the Lord’s house shall be established on the top of the mountains”), INC prophets want to reclaim seven cultural “mountains”: family, government, arts and entertainment, media, business, education, and religion.  The goal is to place God’s appointed leaders atop these cultural mountains as means of setting the stage for the time when God will bring heaven to earth….

…As early as 2007, INC prophet Kim Clement received a word from God: “Trump Clement received a word from God: “Trump shall become a trumpet.  I will raise up Trump to become a trumpet, and Bill Gates to open up the gate of a financial realm for the church.”  Early in the 2016 campaign, Lance Wallnau received a similar word: “Donald Trump is a wrecking ball to the spirit of political correctness.”  When Wallnau’s prophecy caught the attention of Trump’s evangelical supporters, he was invited to attend a meeting with the candidate and other leaders in Trump Tower.  As Wallnau listened to Trump talk about his desire to give evangelicals a more prominent voice in government, he sensed that God was giving him an “assignment”–a “calling related to this guy.”  One day, while he was reading his Facebook page, Wallnau saw a meme predicting Trump would be the “45th president of the United States.”  God told Wallnau to pick up his Bible and turn to Isaiah 45.  On reading the passage, Wallnau realized that, not only would Trump be a “wrecking ball” to political correctness, but he would be elected president of the United States in the spirit of the ancient Persian King Cyrus.  In the Old Testament, Cyrus was the secular political leader whom God used to send the exiled kingdom of Judah back to the Promised Land so that they could rebuild the city of Jerusalem and its holy Temple.  Wallnau was shocked by this discovery.  “God was messing with my head,” he told Steven Strang, the editor of Charisma, a magazine that covers INC and other Pentecostal and charismatic movements (and claims a circulation of over 275,000).  From this point forward, Wallnau would become an outspoken supporter of Donald Trump.

The Metaxas-Wallnau interview is interesting for several reasons:

  1. Notice Wallnau’s reference to Seven Mountain Dominionism.
  2. Wallnau’s description of his conversion experience during the 1970s while a student Valley Forge Military Academy seems legitimate to me.  His story of  engaging Campus Crusade workers on campus in a snowstorm is one of millions of similar stories heard regularly in evangelical circles.  And Wallnau tells it very well.  Wallnau may be embellishing the story, but he still seems to have had a real spiritual experience.
  3. Wallnau’s failure to find other born-again Christians in the northeast corridor during the 1970s confirms my own family’s story.  My family had never heard of evangelical or “born-again” Christianity until my father had a conversion experience in the early 1980s.  I was recently talking to another evangelical who grew up in New Jersey during the 1980s and we were noting how northeast evangelicals in this era were forced to live their faith as a minority.  This experience has led many northeastern evangelicals to think differently about Christian public engagement when compared with southerners or midwesterners.  One day I want to tell this story in full.  It strikes me that those raised in an evangelical culture–Southern Baptists, Dutch Reformed, etc.–did not have to face the kind of persecution and outsider status that we in the northeast had to face when we identified as born-again Christians.  This means we look at American evangelicalism with a different set of eyes.  I don’t recall ever meeting an evangelical Protestant during my childhood.  Wallnau had to go to Lebanon Valley College in south central Pennsylvania in order to find one.
  4. Wallnau’s story about Mennonite Pentecostals in Manheim, Pennsylvania was new to me.  Is anyone aware of Mennonite Pentecostal communities where women’s “bonnets” blew off their heads because the power of the Holy Spirit was so powerful?
  5. Wallnau’s reference to James H. Brown’s charismatic revivals in a Parksburg, PA Presbyterian Church got me curious, so I did some research.  Brown was the pastor at Upper Octorara Presbyterian Church in Parksburg and one of the leaders of the charismatic movement within American Presbyterianism.  Read about him here.
  6. During this interview Donald Trump is compared favorably to Martin Luther, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, and Wilbur Wilberforce.

Of course none of these observations explain the title of my post.  If you fast-forward to the 26-minute mark, Wallnau is talking with Metaxas about his claim that Donald Trump is a modern-day King Cyrus and he mentions a professor at Messiah College.

(Just for the record, I did not coin the term “vessel theology.”  Wallnau is referring to this piece by Tara Isabella Burton at VOX.  I am quoted here, but I never use the term “vessel theology.”  Nevertheless, I do think the term is useful to describe what Wallnau is doing with the King Cyrus prophecy).

Conservative Evangelicals Defend Steve King and Want Kevin McCarthy to Apologize

King and trump

Perhaps some of you missed it.  Iowa congressman Steve King, in an interview with the New York Times, said this: “White nationalists, white supremacist, Western Civilization–how did that language become offensive?”

King later tried to back away from the statement, but it was too little, too late.  House minority leader Kevin McCarthy removed King from the House Judiciary and Agriculture Committees earlier this week and he was almost censured.  King’s remarks were the latest in a long career defined by racist and nativist comments.

Not everyone is happy with what McCarthy, the House Republicans, and Congress have done to King.  Right Wing Watch has brought to my attention news of a group of Christian Right leaders who are supporting King.  The group is led by Janet Porter, a Christian Right activist who served as the spokesperson for Roy Moore’s 2017 Alabama  Senate race.  Porter is asking Christian Right leaders to sign a letter to Kevin McCarthy.  Here is the text of that letter:
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Dear Leader McCarthy,

We are appalled that Republican leadership would choose to believe a liberal news organization famous for their bias over an outstanding member of Congress who has served the people of Iowa and the United States honorably and faithfully for 16 years.

If Congressman Steve King believed and stood by the outrageous misquote of the New York Times, then the actions taken against him would have been warranted, but the opposite is true.

Unlike North Korea, we in the United States are “innocent until proven guilty” and hold to the principles of Western Civilization, as Rep. King so admirably does. The foundational principle begins with the self-evident truth that “all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness.” These are the principles to which Rep. King was referring and which he has championed for more than two decades of public service.

Don’t make the fatal mistake of turning the reins of the U.S. Congress over to the liberal media, allowing them to target, misquote, and falsely brand any member of Congress they wish to remove. 

We call on you to do the right thing as Minority Leader: issue a public apology and reinstate Rep. King to his committee assignments.  If we don’t stand with this good man against the media-manufactured assault today, none of us will be safe from it tomorrow.

The Christian Right leaders who signed this letter include:

  • The scandal-ridden former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay
  • Court evangelical and family values radio host James Dobson
  • Court evangelical and charismatic media mogul Steven Strang
  • Paul Blair, president of an organization called Reclaiming America for Christ
  • Rick Scarborough, a conservative Southern Baptist political activist
  • Lance Wallnau, a court evangelical who claims to have prophesied Donald Trump’s election.
  • Rena Lindevaldsen, a law professor at Liberty University
  • Jim Garlow, a pastor and prominent court evangelical who recently co-authored a book with David Barton.
  • Cythnia Dunbar, a member of the Republican National Committee who is probably best known for trying to bring Christian nationalist ideas into American history books in Texas.  (She also claimed that Barack Obama, if elected POTUS, would work with terrorists to attack the United States within his first 6 months in office).
  • William Federer, a Christian nationalist known for collecting quotes about the founding fathers

I discuss Dobson, Strang, and Wallnau in Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump.

This letter may be more revealing for the people who DID NOT sign it, including Jerry Falwell Jr., Robert Jeffress, Ralph Reed, Gary Bauer, Franklin Graham, Paula White, Johnnie Moore,  Eric Metaxas, and other court evangelicals.

This is Not a Prayer

This is not a prayer.  It is a political speech.  It is a corruption of the spiritual discipline of prayer as taught by the Christian church for two thousand years.  But when you believe you are prophet, I guess this kind of “praying” is appropriate.

Here is some context.

Some of you may not have heard of Lance Wallnau.  I write about him in Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump.  Wallnau was one of the first “prophets” of the Independent Network Charismatic (INC) movement to claim that Donald Trump was the new King Cyrus.

Court Prophet: Jim Acosta of CNN is a “Demon”

Acosta

I write a bit about Lance Wallnau in my forthcoming book Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump.  He is the guy who said God told him that Donald Trump is a new King Cyrus.  He represents the INC wing of the court evangelicals.

In this video, Wallnau says that Trump is not afraid of “demonic” journalists like Jim Acosta of CNN because the POTUS has a special anointing to resist the devil and his minions.

Want to learn more about the connection between these “prophets” and the Trump White House?  Pre-order a copy of Believe Me.

Here is a description of the book:

A historian’s acute take on current American politics 

“Believe me” may be the most commonly used phrase in Donald Trump’s lexicon. Whether about building a wall or protecting the Christian heritage, the refrain is constant. And to the surprise of many, about eighty percent of white evangelicals have believed Trump—at least enough to help propel him into the White House.

Historian John Fea is not surprised—and in Believe Me he explains how we have arrived at this unprecedented moment in American politics. An evangelical Christian himself, Fea argues that the embrace of Donald Trump is the logical outcome of a long-standing evangelical approach to public life defined by the politics of fear, the pursuit of worldly power, and a nostalgic longing for an American past. In the process, Fea challenges his fellow believers to replace fear with hope, the pursuit of power with humility, and nostalgia with history.

Believe Me JPEG