Morning Headlines

New York Times: “Blast Empties One of Busiest Transit Hubs in New York”

Washington Post: “One person in custody after explosion near Manhattan bus terminal”

Wall Street Journal: “Small Investors Face Higher Taxes Under Senate Proposal”

Harrisburg Patriot-News: “Kate Spade, Dollar General, new Sheetz and more are opening in central Pa.”

BBC: “Explosion at Manhattan bus terminal” 

CNN: “1 in custody after Times Square explosion”

FOX: “Explosion in Times Square causes chaos; suspect in custody: NYPD”

 

Morning Headlines

New York Times: “Inside Trump’s Hour-by-Hour Battle for Self-Preservation”

Washington Post: “GOP tax plan diverges wildly from Trump’s promises to the middle class”

Wall Street Journal: “Bitcoin Futures Set to Launch but Critics Warn of Problems”

Harrisburg Patriot-News: “‘Multiple violations’ result in suspension for PSU frat”

BBC: “EU deal not binding- David Davis”

CNN: “‘Time is of the essence'”

FOX: “Washington Post reporter apologizes for ‘bad tweet’ after Trump calls him out”

 

Morning Headlines

New York Times: “Storm Deaths in Puerto Rico May Be Vastly Underestimated”

Washington Post: “Republicans reconsider proposal to shrink corporate tax cut”

Wall Street Journal: “Trump Pushes for Roy Moore at Florida Rally”

Harrisburg Patriot-News: “Live updates: Snow in Harrisburg, other parts of Pa.”

BBC: “Iraq declares war with IS is over”

CNN: “$5 million offer to have his child”

FOX: “Trump rallies for Roy Moore, references accuser’s yearbook, calls Doug Jones Dems’ ‘puppet’”

Congratulations to Crystal and David Downing

Downings

Photo credit: Wheaton College

My Messiah College colleague Crystal Downing will be leaving us next year.  She and her husband, C.S. Lewis scholar David Downing, are headed to Wheaton College.  This is a huge loss for Messiah, but I can’t think of a better couple to share the Marion E. Wade Chair of Christian Thought at Wheaton.  Congratulations!

Here is the press release:

The Marion E. Wade Center is delighted to announce the appointment of Dr. Crystal Downing and Dr. David C. Downing as co-directors and co-holders of the Marion E. Wade Chair of Christian Thought. As Lisa Richmond, Director of Library and Archives at Wheaton College, explains, “The opportunity to have two such distinguished scholars leading the Wade Center is very exciting and holds great promise for continuing the Wade’s strong legacy of work on the seven authors. We are thrilled that the Downings are joining Wheaton in this role.” As co-directors, the Downings will share administrative responsibilities, and as a joint appointment they will also have significantly more time to invest in writing and research on the Wade authors. They will take up their responsibilities at the Wade Center on July 1, 2018.

Dr. Crystal Downing is currently Distinguished Professor of English and Film Studies at Messiah College, PA. She has published on a variety of topics, with much of her recent scholarship focused on the relationship between cultural theory and religious faith. Her first book, Writing Performances: The Stages of Dorothy L. Sayers (Palgrave Macmillan 2004) received an international award from the Dorothy L. Sayers Society in Cambridge, England in 2009. The thought of Sayers and C.S. Lewis is evident in Crystal’s next two books, How Postmodernism Serves (My) Faith (IVP Academic 2006) and Changing Signs of Truth (IVP Academic 2012). The success of her fourth book, Salvation from Cinema (Routledge 2016) has led to her current book project, The Wages of Cinema: Looking through the Lens of Dorothy L. Sayers. Crystal has received a number of teaching awards and was the recipient of the Clyde S. Kilby Research Grant for 2001 from the Wade Center. She holds a PhD in English from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Dr. David Downing currently serves as the R.W. Schlosser Professor of English at Elizabethtown College, PA. He has published widely on C.S. Lewis, including Planets in Peril: A Critical Study of C.S. Lewis’s Ransom Trilogy (UMass 1992), The Most Reluctant Convert: C.S. Lewis’s Journey to Faith (IVP 2002), which was awarded the Clyde S. Kilby Research Grant for 2000, Into the Region of Awe: Mysticism in C.S. Lewis (IVP 2005), and Into the Wardrobe: C.S. Lewis and the Narnia Chronicles (Jossey-Bass 2005). David is also the editor of C.S. Lewis’s The Pilgrim’s Regress: The Wade Annotated Edition (Eerdmans, 2014). A prolific speaker and writer, David has spoken extensively throughout the U.S. and internationally. He has received numerous teaching awards and holds a PhD in English from the University of California at Los Angeles.

The Downings are the first to be jointly appointed to the Wade directorship in the more than 50-year history of the Wade Center. They follow Wade founder and first director Clyde S. Kilby (1965–1980), director Lyle W. Dorsett (1983–1990), and director Christopher W. Mitchell (1994–2013).

Roy Moore and the “Invisible Religious Right”

Roy Moore,Patricia Jones

The phrase “court evangelicals” has made it into in a New Yorker article.  Read Benjamin Wallace-Wells’s piece here.

A taste:

As Trump became more prominent, a few significant figures from the religious right arranged themselves as what the historian John Fea, of Messiah College, in Pennsylvania, calls “court evangelicals.” These figures—such as Liberty University’s Jerry Falwell, Jr., or the Dallas megachurch pastor Robert Jeffress—were willing to cheer on the collapse of distance between the evangelical grassroots and the Republican Party. A few weeks ago, Jeffress welcomed Sean Hannity to his church. The young Alabama pastor I talked to had watched Hannity’s appearance, and thought of the liberal who might have entered the church that day on a spiritual quest, only to be alienated by Hannity’s rhetoric. “Then I had a second, more horrifying thought,” the pastor told me. “What about the lost person who comes in because he watches Hannity? He assumes he’s already a Christian. He’s not looking for grace, because he doesn’t realize he needs it.”

Also this:

One view that I heard from evangelical intellectuals is that Trump and Moore represent a last, furious spasm of the culture wars. John Fea, of Messiah College, pointed out to me how thoroughly the Trump and Moore campaigns were invested with a baby-boomer mixture of nostalgia and fear. “It’s like Pickett’s Charge,” Fea said. “The next generation may reject these political power plays among Christians.” But no such rejection had yet happened. The Roy Moore campaign in Alabama has not so much seemed like a battle in the culture war as a reunion of some of its most devoted veterans. “I am loyal to my friends,” Gonnella, of Magnolia Springs Baptist Church, told me, in explaining why he had stood by Moore. “I don’t desert them.”

Read the entire piece here.

Yes, I did teach the Civil War this semester.  This probably explains why I made the “Pickett’s Charge” reference.

I wish I had more time to blog about this whole Roy Moore mess, but I have been too busy with this.

Morning Headlines

New York Times: “Franken Offers Resignation, and a Parting Shot at Trump”

Washington Post: “Democrats’ move against Franken seen as a moral and political calculation”

Wall Street Journal: “U.S. Payrolls Grew by a Robust 228,000 During November”

Harrisburg Patriot-News: “Hemp industry is growing again in Pennsylvania”

BBC: “Clashes erupt over US Jerusalem move”

CNN: “Email to Trump offered WikiLeaks documents”

FOX: “Federal probe of wife’s $10M loan ongoing, could be roadblock to Sanders’ White House hopes”

Quote of the Day

From Heather Wilhelm in The National Review:

I’ll get this out the way: If you’re in Alabama and you want to vote for Roy Moore, vote for Roy Moore. But let’s at least try to keep things real: If you vote for Moore, you’re doing it because he’s not a Democrat, rather than because he’s some holy soldier on a special mission for God.

Bizarrely, many high-profile Christian leaders seem hell-bent on convincing America that Moore is just that. Jerry Falwell Jr. recently threw in his support for Moore. Radio host and author Eric Metaxas has vigorously promoted theological defenses of why Christians can vote for Moore. Franklin Graham, who took the time to rip Matt Lauer for his “sin” on Twitter, is decidedly more sanguine in his defense of Moore: “Whoever is without sin, let them throw the first stone.”

Read the entire piece here.

Roy Moore Reminds Us When America Was “Great”

Moore RoyIt was during the era of slavery.

Read all about in this piece at VOX.

A taste:

Alabama’s Republican candidate for Senate, Roy Moore, says America needs to be a bit more like it was when it had slaves.

This is not a joke or exaggeration. When asked earlier this year when America was last great, Moore acknowledged, according to the Los Angeles Times, that the country had a history of racial tensions. Then he answered the question: “I think it was great at the time when families were united — even though we had slavery — they cared for one another. … Our families were strong, our country had a direction.”

The quote comes from a Los Angeles Times report published in September, but it was recently resurfaced by a viral tweet from former Obama administration official Eric Columbus.

There are so many problems with this remark that it’s hard to know where to start.

Read the entire piece here.

The Author’s Corner with Jeffrey McDonald

hres.9781498296311.jpgJeffrey McDonald is an Affiliate Professor of Church History at Sioux Falls Seminary. This interview is based on his new book, John Gerstner and the Renewal of Presbyterian and Reformed Evangelicalism in Modern America (Pickwick Publications, 2017).

JF: What led you to write John Gerstner and the Renewal of Presbyterian and Reformed Evangelicalism in Modern America?

JM:  I wrote this book because I felt that John Gerstner and members of the old United Presbyterian Church of North America had been neglected.  The UPCNA was a Covenanter/Seceder influenced denomination that contributed in numerous ways to rise of modern evangelicalism and their work and legacy needs to be appreciated and understood. 

JF: In 2 sentences, what is the argument of John Gerstner and the Renewal of Presbyterian and Reformed Evangelicalism in Modern America?

JM: The argument of the book is that John Gerstner’s efforts led to a revival of interest in Jonathan Edwards and that he helped facilitate the modern resurgence of Presbyterian and Reformed evangelicalism. I demonstrate that the Pittsburgh Seminary church historian made many contributions to American Christianity and became a key shaper of evangelicalism.   

JF: Why do we need to read John Gerstner and the Renewal of Presbyterian and Reformed Evangelicalism in Modern America?

JM: I think my book should be read because it provides good contextual history of a vital faction within American evangelicalism and illuminates very aspects of Presbyterian history. It also shows that evangelical marginalization by mainline Protestantism has led to the growth of evangelicalism.

JF: When and why did you decide to become an American historian? (Or if you are not an American history, how did you get interested in the study of the past?)

JM: I was a history major in college and loved church history in seminary. In seminary I read Don MacLeod’s excellent biography of W. Stanford Reid and that really showed me how I could combine ministry with historical scholarship. I became a historian because history is important to Christians and I enjoy studying and illuminating the past.

JF: What is your next project?

JM: My next book will be a 20th century history of American Presbyterian and Reformed Evangelicalism. My next project will look at the movement from a broader perspective and provide in depth analysis of the various streams.

JF: Thanks, Jeff!

 

Morning Headlines

New York Times: “Trump Hails Jerusalem Plan, but Mideast Is Put on Edge”

Washington Post: “GOP steps up criticism of Mueller, FBI as Russia probe intensifies”

Wall Street Journal: “General Electric’s Power Division to Cut 12,000 Jobs”

Harrisburg Patriot-News: “Educators give an ‘A’ to changes in timing, length of standardized school tests”

BBC: “Palestinians rally over US Jerusalem move”

CNN: “Donald Trump, keeper of promises”

FOX: “200,000 Californians flee homes as wind whips wildfires closer to LA”

Doug Bradburn Takes the Helm at Mount Vernon

BradburnCongrats to Douglas Bradburn on his promotion to President and CEO of George Washington’s Mount Vernon!  Doug takes the position after four years as Founding Director of the Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington.

Check out our interview with Doug on Episode 17 of The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast.  Also check Doug’s interview with me at the “Conversations at the Washington Library” podcast (Episode 4).

Here is the press release:

MOUNT VERNON, VA—The Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association today announced the selection of its current library director, Dr. Doug Bradburn, to serve as the new president and chief executive officer of George Washington’s Mount Vernon. He will begin his tenure on January 1, 2018, as only the eleventh person to hold this esteemed position since 1858, when the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association purchased the estate from the Washington family.

An accomplished leader and noted American history scholar, Bradburn currently serves as Founding Director for Mount Vernon’s Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington. With his appointment as president, Bradburn will expand his responsibilities to oversee the multifaceted daily operations of America’s most visited historic home and its research library. At the same time, he will partner closely with the board to shape the organization’s strategic priorities surrounding preservation, education, and visitor engagement. His selection follows an extensive national search, which began earlier this year after Mount Vernon’s tenth president, Curtis G. Viebranz, announced his plans to step down in late 2017.

“While searching for our next president, the board gave careful thought to Mount Vernon’s immediate needs and to the Association’s long-standing pledge to preserve and protect not only Mount Vernon but the life and legacy of American’s first president, George Washington. Doug brings the right balance of management expertise, intellectual rigor, and passion for George Washington’s legacy to lead us in these times,” said Sarah Miller Coulson, Regent. “We have seen Doug’s energetic and effective leadership in action in the four transformational years that he has served as our library’s founding director, and we are confident that he will apply tremendous enthusiasm and commitment to this position.”

Bradburn was named the Library’s founding director in 2013, mere weeks before the facility opened. In his four years in this role, Bradburn oversaw the selection of more than 60 research fellows and developed and executed dozens of lectures and symposia. He pioneered the launch of the George Washington Leadership Institute, which provides leadership development to government, corporate, and military officials. He also championed the restructuring of Mount Vernon’s teacher outreach programs and the guided the creation of a residential fellowship program for talented college juniors. He secured significant acquisitions of documents and manuscripts for the Library’s collections and spearheaded significant enhancements to the Library’s digital platforms.

“Doug takes the helm at an important time in Mount Vernon’s history,” Coulson continued. “We are confident that he will help us build on our successes in historic preservation, educational outreach, and visitor engagement as we work in new ways and with new audiences to preserve Mount Vernon for generations to come.”

“I am humbled and honored that the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association has entrusted me with the responsibility to lead this beloved institution,” said Bradburn. “My years at the Library have confirmed what I have long believed: that George Washington’s impact on the history and character of our country are far greater than that of any other individual. It is critical that we share these important stories of his life with our guests here at Mount Vernon and with people around the world. I look forward to my new role and to being part of an incredible team.”

Born in Wisconsin and raised in Virginia, Bradburn, 45, holds a B.A. in History and a B.S. in Economics from the University of Virginia and a Ph.D. in History from the University of Chicago.   He is the author and editor of three books and numerous articles and book chapters on the history of the American founding, leadership, and the history of American citizenship.  Before coming to Mount Vernon, Bradburn served as a professor of history and director of graduate studies at the State University of New York- Binghamton University and departed as chair of the history faculty. He will reside on the estate with his wife, Nadene, and their two children, Charles, 14, and Samuel, 12.

A Word From Our Producer

Mug

Drew Dyrli Hermeling, the producer of The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast, sent this e-mail out to our patrons recently (if you haven’t seen it yet, it is on the way) and I wanted to share it with all of our blog readers.

Greetings dedicated patrons,

As the people who make this podcast possible, I wanted to be as transparent with you as I can. While we are very happy with the quality of guests we have had on the show this season, a couple of logistical hiccups have delayed production on the last few episodes. Frankly, one of the drawbacks of going after bigger guests is that they also have more complicated schedules! Therefore, as you may have noticed, we have been releasing fewer episodes than usual. 

Luckily, these hiccups have not meant cancellations, just delays. We are still on track to bring you interviews with two more award-winning authors before the end of the year. However, this is one episode fewer than we offered last autumn. As a result, we are NOT planning on taking a January break like we did last year. Instead we will be playing catch-up so that our full year season equals the same number of episodes as the previous year, if not more! 

You all have done so much to make this podcast happen, and you are the stakeholders that we answer to. And we didn’t want you to feel that our sporadic schedule this last month or so was due to a lack of energy or commitment on our part. We are just as fired up about this project as we were on our first episode—albeit with much better sound! 

So thank you for sticking will us, and as John always says, may your way of improvement always lead home!

Producer Drew

 

Morning Headlines

New York Times: “Trump’s Move on Jerusalem Fuels Alarm Across Mideast”

Washington Post: “U.S. to recognize Jerusalem as Israeli capital, a shift that could lead to unrest”

Wall Street Journal: “In Shift, Trump to Declare Jerusalem Capital of Israel”

Harrisburg Patriot-News: “Eleven gunshots fired at a suspect and a debate over who gets to investigate”

BBC: “US Jerusalem recognition ‘kiss of death'”

CNN: “Trump’s Jerusalem choice promises upheaval”

FOX: “Hamas plans ‘day of rage’ in response to Trump’s Jerusalem decision”

Morning Headlines

New York Times: “Trump Backs Moore, and R.N.C. Restores Its Support”

Washington Post: “New defense by Trump’s counsel is dismissed by legal scholars, leaves White House officials baffled”

Wall Street Journal: “Businesses Push for Breaks After Last-Minute Tax Changes”

Harrisburg Patriot-News: “Outraged parent demands accountability in Central Dauphin bus stop incident”

BBC: “New warnings over US shift on Jerusalem”

CNN: “Trump’s Russia defense in disarray”

FOX: “Mueller reportedly subpoenas Deutsche Bank over relationship with Trump”

Morning Headlines

New York Times: “As Shutdown Looms, G.O.P. Tries to Buy 2 More Weeks”

Washington Post: “Trump lawyer says president knew Flynn had given FBI the same account he gave to vice president”

Wall Street Journal: “Tax Bill Marked by Blinding Speed”

Harrisburg Patriot-News: “In eastern PA senate districts, incumbents feel safe, but many voters feel out of the loop”

BBC: “Trump criticised for FBI attacks”

CNN: “Trump fully endorses Roy Moore”

FOX: “Politicians would face prison, fines for harboring illegal immigrants under bill to be unveiled today”

The Author’s Corner with Patrick Griffin

515zcPMhSNL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Patrick Griffin is Madden- Hennebry Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. This interview is based on his new book, The Townshend Moment: The Making of Empire and Revolution in the Eighteenth-Century (Yale University Press, 2017).

JF: What led you to write The Townshend Moment?

PG: I started the book with nothing more than a hunch.  I had always been fascinated by the parallels and connections between Ireland and America in the eighteenth century.  And two British brothers, Charles and George Townshend, at the very same moment held important positions that helped determine the fate of each place.  Could their stories, if brought together, tell us more about Ireland and America and about the empire the brothers were responsible for?  I began scratching the surface, and I discovered that their entangled story suggested a deeper set of questions.

JF: In 2 sentences, what is the argument of The Townshend Moment?

PG:  At certain junctures of time and through contingent events, men and women come to believe they are living during critical “moments.”  Empire and revolution are born through such ways of thinking.

JF: Why do we need to read The Townshend Moment?

PG: We need to read this story because it reminds how complex the past really is and how we, as actors, try to come up with simple ways to bring meaning to that complexity and act on that meaning in the present with an eye toward creating the future.  The book offers on one level a dual biography of two larger-that-life characters who determined the fortunes of empire, as well as a comparative history of Ireland and America in the eighteenth century.  It also explores, in a new way, the relationship between imperial reform and revolution at the beginning of the “Age of Atlantic Revolution.”  Finally, it suggests how powerful people believe that they can comprehend and shape the forces of history and global processes of change to try to bring order to a system.  Of course, they soon learn that people far away have other ideas.  They, too, come to believe they can craft their own destinies, but ones often at odds with what those in power propose.  This is a classic tale of hubris, a drama in fact.

JF: When and why did you decide to become an American historian? 

PG:  I became an American historian by dumb luck, contingency, or Providence.  I don’t quite know which. I was destined to be a Political Scientist.  I started my graduate career doing Comparative Politics.  I soon learned that I had talents in other areas.  In a graduate program for history, I followed my passions, and they led me to the eighteenth-centiry Atlantic.  I have been there ever since, and I imagine I will be there for a long time still.

JF: What is your next project?

PG: I am, speaking of hubris, working on a study of the Age of Atlantic Revolution(s).  The parentheses matter here.  I am not sure if the period gave birth to a singular event or to a plurality of events.  We shall see.  I am calling it, for lack of a better term, a provocation.

JF: Thanks, Patrick!

Quotes of the Day

Alexander_Hamilton_James_Madison

Federalist 57The aim of every political Constitution is or ought to be first to obtain for rulers, men who possess most wisdom to discern, and most virtue to pursue the common good of the society, and in the next place, to take the most effectual precautions for keeping them virtuous, whist they continue to hold their public trust.

Federalist 68Talents for low intrigue, and the  little arts of popularity, may alone suffice to elevate a man to the first honors in a single State; but it will require other talents, and a different kind of merit, to establish him in the esteem and confidence of the whole Union, or of so considerable a portion of it as would be necessary to make him a successful candidate for the distinguished office of the President of the United States.”  It will not be too strong to say, that there will be a constant probability of seeing the station filled by characters pre-eminent for ability and virtue.