Michael Cohen alleges that Trump called evangelical beliefs “bulls–t”

As most of you know, Michael Cohen was Donald Trump’s longtime personal attorney and “fixer.” The press is now starting to get access to his forthcoming memoir, Disloyal: A Memoir.

Here is a taste of Ashley Parker and Rosalind S. Helderman’s piece at The Washington Post:

Cohen describes Trump’s obsessive hatred of Obama, including claiming that the only reason the former president got into Columbia University and Harvard Law School was because of “f—ing affirmative action.” He also recounts Trump’s “low opinion of all black folks.” claiming that Trump once said while ranting about Obama, “Tell me one country run by a black person that isn’t a s—hole. They are all complete f—ing toilets.”

After South African President Nelson Mandela died in 2013, Trump said he did not think Mandela “was a real leader — not the kind he respected,” Cohen writes.

Instead, Cohen writes that Trump praised the country’s apartheid-era White rule, saying: “Mandela f—ed the whole country up. Now it’s a s—hole. F— Mandela. He was no leader.”

Cohen writes that before winning the presidency, Trump held a meeting at Trump Tower with prominent evangelical leaders, where they laid their hands on him in prayer. Afterward, Trump allegedly said: “Can you believe that bulls–t? Can you believe people believe that bulls–t?”

“The cosmic joke was that Trump convinced a vast swathe of working-class white folks in the Midwest that he cared about their well-being,” Cohen writes. “The truth was that he couldn’t care less.”

“Can you believe people believe that bulls–t?”

Read the entire article here.

We will see if anyone corroborates Cohen’s story in the same way people are corroborating Trump’s words about American military personnel.

This all reminds me of the late David Kuo, an evangelical speechwriter for Jack Kemp, Bill Bennett, John Ashcroft, court evangelical Ralph Reed, Dan Quayle, and George H.W. Bush. He also worked in Bush’s Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships.

In his book Tempting Faith, Kuo wrote:

For…the White House staff, evangelical leaders were people to be tolerated, not people who were truly welcomed. No group was more eye-rolling about Christians than the political affairs shop. They knew “the nuts” were politically invaluable, but that was the extent of their usefulness. Sadly, the political affairs folks complained most often and most loudly about how boorish many political involved Christians were. They didn’t see much of the love of Jesus in their lives…There wasn’t a week that went by that I didn’t hear someone in the middle-to-senior levels making some comment or another about how annoying the Christians were or how tiresome they were, or how “handling” them took so much time. National Christian leaders received hugs and smiles in person and then were dismissed behind their backs and described as “ridiculous,” “out of control,” and just plain “goofy.”

Kuo, who died of a brain tumor in 2013, realized that the White House is “one of the most seductive places imaginable. Not just because of the perks…but because of the raw power of the place hidden in true desire to save the world.”