An Adjunct Instructor Reflects on How Much He Should Invest in the Mission of a Church-Related University

Scranton

This is an important post for those of us in church-related academia, especially administrators.   Jonathan Wilson discusses his experience as an adjunct history professor at the Jesuit-run University of Scranton, but his thoughts apply to any faith-based institution or any college or university with a religious mission.

Here is a taste:

My teaching season began today. The summer isn’t over, but for the next two weeks, I will be participating in faculty development seminars offered by the Jesuit Center at the University of Scranton.

These seminars focus on pedagogy and the vocation of a teacher. Most participants today said they came to learn how to teach better. However, there is also a larger institutional purpose. The University of Scranton encourages its instructors to think of our work in explicitly Catholic ways. We are not expected to be Catholics—although I suspect most participants in today’s seminar were at least raised that way—but we are encouraged to place our teaching within that tradition. We are asked to “support the mission,” in the typical language used on campus; these seminars are designed to help faculty members across different disciplines conceptualize what that means.

At this point, I’ll confess to mixed feelings, but not about Catholicism….

Read the rest here.

One thought on “An Adjunct Instructor Reflects on How Much He Should Invest in the Mission of a Church-Related University

  1. From my perspective as a retired physician I see that at this time in health care mostmproviders are adjunct. Work at whim of the profitable non profit, Most providers provide as author teaches, it is the mission. Interesting moment in history.

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