The President of Fuller Seminary’s Speech at the Wheaton Consultation on Evangelicalism

9475f-wheaton

As many of you now know, evangelical leaders of the non-court evangelical variety met at Wheaton College earlier this week to discuss the future of evangelicalism.  See our coverage here.

One of the evangelical leaders in attendance at the meeting was Mark Labberton, president of Fuller Theological Seminary, a flagship evangelical institution in Pasadena, California.  On Fuller’s historic role as a vanguard of the 20th-century evangelical movement I strongly recommend George Marsden’s Reforming Fundamentalism: Fuller Seminar and the New Evangelicalism.

Labberton has spent most of his career as a pastor in the Presbyterian Church (USA), but as president of Fuller (replacing evangelical icon Richard Mouw) he has become a prominent anti-Trump evangelical.  He is the editor of Still Evangelical: Insiders Reconsider Political, Social, and Theological Meaning.

Labberton spoke at the Wheaton gathering.  Here is a taste of what he said:

This is not a recent crisis but a historic one.  We face a haunting specter with a shadow that reaches back further than the 2016 election—a history that helps define the depth of the sorrow, fear, anger, anxiety, and injustice around us. Today’s egregious collusion between evangelicals and worldly power is problematic enough: more painful and revealing is that such collusion has been our historic habit. Today’s collusion bears astonishing—and tragic—continuity with the past.

Right alongside the rich history of gospel faithfulness that evangelicalism has affirmed, there lies a destructive complicity with dominant cultural and racial power. Despite deep gospel confidence and rhetoric, evangelicalism has been long-wedded to a devastating social self-interest that defends the dominant culture over and against that of the gospel’s command to love the “other” as ourselves.  We are not naïve in our doctrine of sin that prefers self over all, but we have failed to recognize our own guilt in it.

Our professed trust in Jesus has not led evangelicals to die to ourselves, but often to justify our own self-assertion—even when that means complicity in the suffering and death of others. The scandal associated today with the evangelical gospel is not the scandal of the Cross of Christ, crucified for the salvation of the world.  Rather it is the scandal of our own arrogance, unconfessed before the Cross, revealing a hypocritical superiority that we dare to associate with the God who died to save the weak and the lost.

In order to be concrete about this, let me choose what I believe to be the top four arenas in which this violation of spiritual and moral character has shown itself:

Read the rest here.

I am glad that Labberton sees this as a historical problem.  I assume this is why Mark Noll was at the Wheaton consultation.