Something for Sarah Huckabee Sanders to Think About

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Sarah Huckabee Sanders has replaced Sean Spicer as Donald Trump’s Press Secretary.  Sanders, the daughter of former Arkansas governor and presidential candidate Mike Huckabee, is an evangelical Christian.

Most American evangelicals are fond of C.S. Lewis.  Perhaps Sanders has read “The Chronicles of Narnia” series to her children or hopes that they will read it on their own some day.  I imagine that Sanders would embrace much of what Lewis has to say in his classic Mere Christianity.

With this in mind, I hope Sanders gets a chance to read Jennifer Rubin’s short Washington Post piece “The inevitable, fitting end to Spicer’s miserable tenure in the White House.”  Rubin’s “moral argument” is definitely worth considering, not only for Sanders, but for all of us.

Here is a taste:

There is a moral argument, I suppose, for men and women who chose to go into this administration to serve in Cabinet-level or sub-Cabinet positions out of a sense of obligation to the country. (The better argument is that working in this administration inevitably leads to enabling wrongdoing and horrible policy decisions, but I understand the rationale of those who disagree with me.) However, there is no moral argument for going directly into the president’s senior/political staff, which in this administration means defending indefensible conduct, denying reality and encouraging others to lie in defense of the administration. You cannot serve in a dishonorable White House honorably.

Spicer willingly embraced the effort to intimidate and silence the press. He accepted his role in trying to demolish objective reality. He relished the mission to discredit every independent source of information that might contradict the president. In doing so he, more than any predecessor, did harm to the First Amendment and to the White House. He lowered the standard set by administrations of both parties — spin, advocate and sidestep but never lie.

For young, ambitious men and women in Washington and elsewhere, Spicer is an object lesson. Ambition and yearning to be in the “know,” in the center of power (what C.S. Lewis called the “inner ring“), can lead one to cast aside principle, values and simple decency. Lewis described the impulse to be an insider:

And you will be drawn in, if you are drawn in, not by desire for gain or ease, but simply because at that moment, when the cup was so near your lips, you cannot bear to be thrust back again into the cold outer world. It would be so terrible to see the other man’s face—that genial, confidential, delightfully sophisticated face—turn suddenly cold and contemptuous, to know that you had been tried for the Inner Ring and rejected. And then, if you are drawn in, next week it will be something a little further from the rules, and next year something further still, but all in the jolliest, friendliest spirit. It may end in a crash, a scandal, and penal servitude; it may end in millions, a peerage and giving the prizes at your old school. But you will be a scoundrel. … Of all the passions, the passion for the Inner Ring is most skillful in making a man who is not yet a very bad man do very bad things.

Read the entire piece here.