If Kanye West does not become president you can blame the iPhone. They are “notoriously faulty”

Celebrities At The Los Angeles Lakers Game

Here is Amber Neely at Apple Insider:

West’s lawyer is now claiming that the “notoriously faulty” clock of the iPhone may be one of many reasons his campaign team missed Wisconsin’s strict 5:00 p.m. ballot deadline.

Kanye West’s campaign team reportedly filed his Wisconsin presidential campaign ballot 14 seconds late on August 4, preventing his name from being added to the state’s presidential ballot. His campaign team and lawyer are now pushing back against Wisconsin in an attempt to get West added to the ballot.

A West campaign aide, Lane Ruhland, said that she had arrived at Wisconsin’s Elections Commission office before 5:00 p.m., though the door was locked, putting her behind schedule. By the time she reached the door, it was 14 seconds after the filing deadline.

West’s lawyer, Michael Curran, points that a Democratic Party staffer had timed her entrance with an iPhone video and that iPhone clocks are “notoriously faulty.”

Ruhland claims that the elections specialist had not provided any official timestamp, either.

“The elections specialist did not show us a clock, timer or recording showing the time of 5:00:14, nor did the filings receive a time stamp,” Ruhland said in her affidavit, highlighted by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

Read the rest here.

Pentecostal Preacher Checks His Phone While Speaking in Tongues

We all have to tell our kids (and ourselves!) to put the phone down and concentrate on what they/we are doing. But perhaps we have been wrong about such exhortations. Perhaps God speaks directly to us through our smart phones! Here is Pentecostal preacher Perry Stone checking his phone as he speaks in tongues.

Stone’s ministry is located in Cleveland, Tennessee, the home of the Pentecostal Church of God (Cleveland) denomination.  Perhaps I will see him at the Lee University Symposium on Faith and Politics in Cleveland this weekend.  If he does, I would love to talk to him and find out what is going on in this video.  (I am also curious about the guy with the tattoo who comes in to wipe the table).  Stay tuned!

Lock Up the Phones!

SBS

This morning we published a post about smartphones in school.

Over at Newsday, education reporter John Hildebrand writes about the evening smart phone policy at The Stony Brook School on Long Island.  (Full disclosure, we lived in a dorm at The Stony Brook School from 1995-2000 where Joy was Assistant Dean of Students and Director of Residential Life.  I taught AP US History there during the 1999-2000 school year).

Here is a taste:

Separating teenagers from their cellphones — a difficult thing, as many parents can attest — is a weeknight reality at a prep-school campus on Long Island’s North Shore.  

On Monday through Thursday nights, student boarders at The Stony Brook School lock up their cellphones in special neoprene pouches during study hours from 7:45 to 9:45 p.m. The 96-year-old private academy also prohibits use of the phones during lunches, dinners and twice-a-week chapel services. 

The partial phone ban, which started with the opening of classes in late August, is designed to help students concentrate on work that includes rigorous college-level courses such as Advanced Placement Latin. 

Read the rest here.

Middle School 2008 vs. Middle School 2018

Cell Phone

Brian Conlan, a public school teacher, has written an important piece about social media in schools.  It is part of a larger campaign to limit smartphone use among kids.  Here is a taste:

Let’s imagine a seventh grader. He’s a quiet kid, polite, with a few friends. Just your ordinary, run-of-the-mill twelve-year-old. We’ll call him Brian. Brian’s halfway through seventh grade and for the first time, he’s starting to wonder where he falls in the social hierarchy at school. He’s thinking about his clothes a little bit, his shoes too. He’s conscious of how others perceive him, but he’s not that conscious of it. 

He goes home each day and from the hours of 3 p.m. to 7 a.m., he has a break from the social pressures of middle school. Most evenings, he doesn’t have a care in the world. The year is 2008. 

Brian has a cell phone, but it’s off most of the time. After all, it doesn’t do much. If friends want to get in touch, they call the house. The only time large groups of seventh graders come together is at school dances. If Brian feels uncomfortable with that, he can skip the dance. He can talk to teachers about day-to-day problems. Teachers have pretty good control over what happens at school.

Now, let’s imagine Brian on a typical weekday. He goes downstairs and has breakfast with his family. His mom is already at work, but his dad and sisters are there. They talk to each other over bowls of cereal. The kids head off to school soon after. Brian has a fine morning in his seventh grade classroom and walks down to the lunchroom at precisely 12 p.m.

Read the rest here.