The National Book Award Longlist

Ona JudgeThe following ten books will be considered for the National Book Award:

Erica Armstrong Dunbar, “Never Caught: The Washingtons’ Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge
37 ink / Atria / Simon & Schuster

Frances FitzGerald, “The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America” Simon & Schuster

James Forman, Jr., “Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America
Farrar, Straus & Giroux / Macmillan

Masha Gessen, “The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia
Riverhead Books / Penguin Random House

David Grann, “Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the F.B.I.
Doubleday / Penguin Random House

Naomi Klein, “No Is Not Enough: Resisting Trump’s Shock Politics and Winning the World We Need
Haymarket Books

Nancy MacLean, “Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America
Viking / Penguin Random House

Richard Rothstein, “The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America
Liveright / W. W. Norton & Company

Timothy B. Tyson, “The Blood of Emmett Till
Simon & Schuster

Kevin Young, “Bunk: The Rise of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, Post-Facts, and Fake News
Graywolf Press

George Washington Book Prize Finalists Chosen

alito

I got to meet Supreme Court Justice Sam Alito at the 2012 George Washington Book Prize Gala at Mount Vernon.  My Was America Founded as a Christian Nation?: A Historical Introduction was one of three finalists that year.

And here they are:

Chestertown, MD—In celebration of George Washington’s 285th birthday, seven books published in 2016 by the country’s most prominent historians have been named finalists for the George Washington Prize. The annual award recognizes the past year’s best-written works on the nation’s founding era, especially those that have the potential to advance broad public understanding of early American history.

Created in 2005 by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, George Washington’s Mount Vernon, and Washington College, the $50,000 George Washington Prize is one of the nation’s largest and most notable literary awards, and this year’s finalists include past Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winners.

The finalists’ books combine depth of scholarship and broad expanse of inquiry with vivid prose that exposes the complexities of our founding narrative. Through compelling storytelling, the authors introduce readers to citizen soldiers and statesmen, artists and frontiersmen, heroes and traitors, loyalists and rebels—the ordinary, the ambitious, and the exceptional men and women who, in the chaos and contradictions of revolution, imagined a different world order and gave shape to a new nation.

Written to engage a wide public audience, the books provide a “go-to” reading list for anyone interested in learning more about George Washington, his contemporaries, and the drama of the revolutionary founding of the United States of America.

The 2017 George Washington Prize finalists are:

● T.H. Breen, George Washington’s Journey: The President Forges a New Nation (Simon and Schuster)

● Annette Gordon-Reed and Peter S. Onuf, “Most Blessed of the Patriarchs”: Thomas Jefferson and the Empire of the Imagination (Liveright Publishing)

● Jane Kamensky, A Revolution in Color: The World of John Singleton Copley (W.W. Norton)

● Michael J. Klarman, The Framers’ Coup: The Making of the United States Constitution(Oxford University Press)

● Mark Edward Lender and Garry Wheeler Stone, Fatal Sunday: George Washington, the Monmouth Campaign, and the Politics of Battle (University of Oklahoma Press)

● Nathaniel Philbrick, Valiant Ambition: George Washington, Benedict Arnold, and the Fate of the American Revolution (Viking) 

● Alan Taylor, American Revolutions: A Continental History, 1750-1804 (W.W. Norton)

A distinguished jury comprised of notable historians David Preston, Kathleen DuVal, and Nick Bunker, selected the finalists from a field of nearly 60 books. The winner of the 2017 prize will be announced, and all finalists recognized, at a black-tie gala on Thursday, May 25 at George Washington’s Mount Vernon. More information about the George Washington Prize is available at washcoll.edu/gwbookprize.

American Historical Association Announces Prize Winners

border-lawHere are some of the winners that might be of interest to readers of The Way of Improvement Leads Home.

The Albert J. Beveridge Award on the history of the United States, Latin America, or Canada, from 1492 to the present: Ann Twinam (Univ. of Texas at Austin) for Purchasing Whiteness: Pardos, Mulattos, and the Quest for Social Mobility in the Spanish Indies (Stanford Univ. Press, 2015)

The Waldo G. Leland Prize offered every five years for the most outstanding reference tool in the field of history: Father Peter J. Powell (Newberry Library), editor, for In Sun’s Likeness and Power: Cheyenne Accounts of Shield and Tipi Heraldry, 2 vols., by James Mooney (Univ. of Nebraska Press, 2013)

The Littleton-Griswold Prize in US law and society, broadly defined: Deborah A. Rosen (Lafayette Coll.) for Border Law: The First Seminole War and American Nationhood (Harvard Univ. Press, 2015)

The James A. Rawley Prize for the integration of Atlantic worlds before the 20th century: Tamar Herzog (Harvard Univ.) for Frontiers of Possession: Spain and Portugal in Europe and the Americas (Harvard Univ. Press, 2015)

The James Harvey Robinson Prize for the teaching aid that has made the most outstanding contribution to the teaching and learning of history in any field for public or educational purposes: Julie Golia and Robin M. Katz (Brooklyn Historical Society) for TeachArchives.org

The Roy Rosenzweig Prize for Innovation in Digital History to a freely available new media project: Charles Hardy III and Janneken Smucker (West Chester Univ.) and Doug Boyd (Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, Univ. of Kentucky Libraries) for Goin’ North: Stories from the First Great Migration to Philadelphia

The Beveridge Family Teaching Prize for distinguished K–12 history teaching: Craig Blackman, on behalf of Indian River High School, Chesapeake, VA

The Herbert Feis Award for distinguished contributions to public history: Yolanda Chávez Leyva (Univ. of Texas at El Paso)

The Nancy Lyman Roelker Mentorship Award for teachers of history who taught, guided, and inspired their students in a way that changed their lives: Neal Shultz (The Campus School of the New Rochelle School District)

The Award for Scholarly Distinction to senior historians for lifetime achievement: Alice Kessler-Harris (Columbia Univ.) and Colin A. Palmer (Princeton Univ.)

All the winners are listed here.

Who Won Awards at #oah2016?

83502-oahProcess blog has it covered.  Here is a taste are a few of the award winners that got our attention here at The Way of Improvement Leads Home:

Frederick Jackson Turner Award for the author of a first scholarly book dealing with some aspect of American history: Mark G. Hanna, University of California, San Diego for Pirate Nests and the Rise of the British Empire, 1570–1740 (University of North Carolina Press).

Richard W. Leopold Prize for the best book on foreign policy, military affairs, historical activities of the federal government, documentary histories, or biography written by a U.S. government historical or federal contract historian: Jacqueline E. Whitt, Air War College for Bringing God to Men: American Military Chaplains and the Vietnam War (University of North Carolina Press).

Avery O. Craven Award for the most original book on the coming of the Civil War, and Civil War years, or the Era of Reconstruction, with the exception of works of purely military history: Martha Hodes, New York University for Mourning Lincoln (Yale University Press).

James A. Rawley Prize for the best book with the history of race relations in the United States: Margaret Ellen Newell, Ohio State University for Brethren by Nature: New England Indians, Colonists, and the Origins of American Slavery (Cornell University Press).

Ellis W. Hawley Prize for the best book-length historical study of the political economy, politics, or institutions of the United States, in its domestic or international affairs, from the Civil War to the present: Gary Gerstle, University of Cambridge for Liberty and Coercion: The Paradox of American Government from the Founding to the Present (Princeton University Press).

David Montgomery Award for the best book on a topic in American labor and working-class history, with cosponsorship by the Labor and Working-Class History Association (LAWCHA): Elizabeth Fones-Wolf and Ken Fones-Wolf, West Virginia University for Struggle for the Soul of the Postwar South: White Evangelical Protestants and Operation Dixie (University of Illinois Press).

Mary Jurich Nickliss Prize in U.S. Women’s and/or Gender History for the most original book in U.S. women’s and/or gender history: Cassandra Alexis Good, University of Mary Washington for Founding Friendships: Friendships between Men and Women in the Early American Republic (Oxford University Press).

Lerner-Scott Prize for the best doctoral dissertation in U.S. women’s history: Susan Hanket Brandt, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, “Gifted Women and Skilled Practitioners: Gender and Healing Authority in the Delaware Valley, 1740–1830.”

Mary K. Bonsteel Tachau Teacher of the Year Award for contributions made by precollegiate teachers to improve history education within the field of American history: Susan Miller, Middlesborough High School, Massachusetts.

Bancroft Prize(s) Announced

LipmanHere is the press release:

A book on the 1787 Constitutional Convention and two books on the way encounters with Native Americans shaped the emerging American nation have won the Bancroft Prize, considered one of the most prestigious honors in the field of American history.

Mary Sarah Bilder, a professor at Boston College Law School, won for “Madison’s Hand: Revisiting the Constitutional Convention”(Harvard University Press), which uses both digital technology and traditional textual analysis to study how James Madison continuously revised his influential notes on the event, thus sharply challenging their claim to be an objective contemporaneous account.

Deborah A. Rosen, a professor at Lafayette College, was cited for “Border Law: The First Seminole War and American Nationhood”(Harvard University Press), which describes how that conflict, which lasted from 1816 to 1818, laid the legal groundwork for the Monroe Doctrine, westward expansion and the Dred Scott decision of 1857.

Andrew Lipman, an assistant professor at Barnard College, won for“The Saltwater Frontier: Indians and the Contest for the American Coast” (Yale University Press), which draws on English, Dutch and archaeological sources to examine how the waters between the Hudson River and Cape Cod were both a battleground and a place of exchange from the 16th through the mid-18th centuries.

The Bancroft Prize, established in 1948 by the trustees of Columbia University with a bequest from the historian Frederic Bancroft, includes an award of $10,000.

Congrats!

Check out our Author’s Corner interviews with Bilder and Lipman.  Once again, an appearance at the Author’s Corner serves as a springboard to prestige and fame in the world of American history.

*Mourning Lincoln* Wins the Gilder-Lehrman Lincoln Prize

0f5cb-mourninglincolnCongratulations to Martha Hodes.  You can read our Author’s Corner interview with her here.

Here is the announcement published at The New York Times:

Mourning Lincoln,” the historian Martha Hodes’s account of how ordinary Americans lamented (or celebrated) the assassination of the Great Emancipator, has won the Gilder Lehrman Lincoln Prize, which is awarded annually by Gettysburg College and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History. The prize, for “the finest scholarly work in English on Abraham Lincoln, carries a $50,000 cash award.

In the book, which was published by Yale University Press, Ms. Hodes drew on diaries, letters and other writings by ordinary citizens — black and white, Northern and Southern — from the spring and summer of 1865. The prize jury called it “a stunning and enlightening work that underscores the rage that Lincoln’s assassination fueled, the outpouring of grief that resulted, and how the anger and confusion that boiled across the country that summer influenced the failures of Reconstruction.”

Ms. Hodes, a professor at New York University, said in a statement that the “irreconcilable visions” beyond differing responses to the assassination continue to echo in our own time.

“Black freedom, the fate of former Confederates, and the future of the nation were at stake for all Americans, whether they grieved or rejoiced when they heard the news,” she said. “Because the meaning of the Civil War remains unresolved, we continue to ponder Lincoln’s legacies into the 21st century.”

2016 George Washington Book Prize Finalists Announced

FInalists

With 2012 GW Book Prize Finalists at Mount Vernon, Ben Irvin and Maya Jasanoff

When my Was America Founded as a Christian Nation?: A Historical Introduction was chosen as a finalist for the George Washington Book Prize in 2012, there were only three books that made the cut.  This year there are seven finalists.  And it is a very impressive group.

Here is the press release:

Chestertown, MD—To mark the holiday celebrating the country’s first president, Washington College today announced seven finalists for the prestigious George Washington Prize. The annual award recognizes the past year’s best written works on the nation’s founding era, especially those that have the potential to advance broad public understanding of early American history.

Created in 2005 by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, George Washington’s Mount Vernon, and Washington College, the $50,000 George Washington Prize is one of the nation’s largest and most notable literary awards. Past recipients have included Pulitzer Prize-wining historian Annette Gordon-Reed and playwright Lin-Manuel Miranda.

This year’s finalists represent both the depth of new scholarship and the broad expanse of inquiry into the diversity of people and the political, geographic, economic, and social forces that shaped the American Revolution and the early republic. The books, written to engage a wide public audience, provide a “go-to” reading list for anyone interested in learning more about George Washington and his times.

With superb narrative skill, the authors immerse readers into domestic life at Mount Vernon, a bloody battle on the banks of the Monongahela River, bustling multi-ethnic settlements along the Gulf Coast, onboard ships with revolutionaries crisscrossing the Atlantic world, a depleted encampment at Valley Forge, a contentious convention in Philadelphia in 1787, and the Weehawken dueling grounds at dawn. These were places where well and little known stories of our nation’s past unfolded, revolutionary leaders were forged, and the ideas of liberty, democracy, and republicanism were tested.

The 2016 George Washington Prize finalists are:

* Mary Sarah Bilder, Madison’s Hand: Revising the Constitutional Convention (Harvard University Press)

* Kathleen DuVal, Independence Lost: Lives on the Edge of the American Revolution (Random House)

* Flora Fraser, The Washingtons: George and Martha, “Join’d by Friendship, Crown’d by Love” (Knopf)

* Robert Middlekauff, Washington’s Revolution: The Making of America’s First Leader (Knopf)

* Janet Polasky, Revolutions Without Borders: The Call to Liberty in the Atlantic World (Yale University Press)

* David Preston, Braddock’s Defeat: The Battle of the Monongahela and the Road to Revolution (Oxford University Press)

* John Sedgwick, War of Two: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Duel that Stunned the Nation (Penguin)

Distinguished historians and writers Sean Wilentz, Libby O’Connell, and James Kirby Martin served as independent jurors who selected the finalists from a field of nearly 60 books published in the past year. The winner of the 2016 prize will be announced at a black-tie gala on Wednesday, May 25 at George Washington’s Mount Vernon.

More information about the George Washington Prize is available at washcoll.edu/gwbookprize. For more information about the finalists or to arrange interviews, please contact Washington College Director of Media Relations Wendy M. Clarke, (wclarke2@washcoll.edu 410.810.7431) or George Washington Prize Coordinator Jean Wortman (jwortman2@washcoll.edu 410-810-7165).

AUTHOR BIOGRAPHIES

MARY SARAH BILDER is Professor of Law and Michael and Helen Lee Distinguished Scholar at Boston College Law School. Her work focuses on the history of the Constitution, the history of judicial review, and colonial and founding era constitutionalism.

KATHLEEN DUVAL is a professor in the History Department at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Author of The Native Ground: Indians and Colonists in the Heart of the Continent, DuVal has also published in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Chicago Tribune, and William and Mary Quarterly.

FLORA FRASER is author of Beloved Emma: The Life of Emma, Lady Hamilton; The Unruly Queen: The Life of Queen Caroline; Princesses: The Six Daughters of George III; and Pauline Bonaparte: Venus of Empire. Fraser is chair of the Elizabeth Longford Prize for Historical Biography. She lives in London.

ROBERT MIDDLEKAUFF is Preston Hotchkis Professor of American History, Emeritus, at the University of California, Berkeley. His books include The Mathers: Three Generations of Puritan Intellectuals, 1596-1728, which won the Bancroft Prize; The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763-1789, which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize; and Benjamin Franklin and His Enemies.

JANET POLASKY is Presidential Professor of History at the University of New Hampshire. She is the author of the prize-winning Revolution in Brussels, 1787-1793; The Democratic Socialism of Emile Vandervelde: Between Reform and Revolution; and Reforming Urban Labor: Routes to the City, Roots in the Country.

DAVID PRESTON is an award-winning historian of early America, and Professor of History at The Citadel. He is the author of The Texture of Contact: European and Indian Settler Communities on the Frontiers of Iroquoia, 1667-1783, which received the 2010 Albert B. Corey Prize.

JOHN SEDGWICK has been a journalist, novelist, memoirist and a biographer, publishing twelve books altogether. He is best known for his best-selling six-generation family memoir, In My Blood, and his acclaimed psychological novel, The Dark House. He has been a regular at Newsweek, GQ, The Atlantic, Vanity Fair, among many other publications.

ABOUT THE SPONSORS OF THE GEORGE WASHINGTON PRIZE

Washington College was founded in 1782, the first institution of higher learning established in the new republic. George Washington was not only a principal donor to the college, but also a member of its original governing board. He received an honorary degree from the college in June 1789, two months after assuming the presidency. The college’s C.V. Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, which administers the Washington Prize, is an innovative center for the study of history, culture, and politics, and fosters excellence in the art of written history through fellowships, prizes, and student programs. For more information: http://www.washcoll.edu.

The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History is a nonprofit devoted to the teaching and learning of American history. Gilder Lehrman draws on top scholars, an unparalleled collection of original historical documents, and a national network of more than 8,000 Affiliate Schools to create and provide a broad range of innovative resources to help teachers, students, scholars, and the general public learn about American history in a way that is engaging and memorable. The Institute’s programs have been recognized by awards from the White House, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Organization of American Historians. For more information: http://www.gilderlehrman.org.

With its latest initiative, The Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington, George Washington’s Mount Vernon affirms its status as the preeminent center of learning about Washington, his life, character of leadership, and legacy. In addition to safeguarding original books and manuscripts, the Library serves as a center for leadership inspired by Washington’s extraordinary example. Mount Vernon is owned and operated by the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association, America’s oldest national preservation organization, founded in 1853. For more information: http://www.mountvernon.org.

Messiah College History Alum Wins the Breveridge Family Teaching Prize

Each year the American Historical Association awards the prestigious Breveridge Family Teaching Prize for distinguished K-12 history teaching.  This year’s winner is Carlisle (PA) High School History Teacher Kevin Wagner.

Kevin is a Messiah College graduate (history major) and a former adjunct in the Messiah College History Department

Congratulations and nice work, Kevin! Yet another well-deserved teaching award!

American Historical Association Announces 2015 Prize Winners

Congratulations to all.  Here are few of note for readers of The Way of Improvement Leads Home:


The Albert J. Beveridge Award on the history of the United States, Latin America, or Canada, from 1492 to the present:

Elizabeth A. Fenn (Univ. of Colorado Boulder), Encounters at the Heart of the World: A History of the Mandan People (Hill & Wang, 2014) 

Greg Grandin (New York Univ.), The Empire of Necessity: Slavery, Freedom, and Deception in the New World (Metropolitan Books, 2014)

The Raymond J. Cunningham Prize for the best article published in a history department journal written by an undergraduate student 

Michael Welker (Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, BA 2014), Faculty Sponsor: James L. Leloudis (Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), “Nothing without a Demand: Black Power and Student Activism on North Carolina College Campuses, 1967–1973,” Traces: The UNC-Chapel Hill Journal of History (Spring 2014) 

The John H. Dunning Prize offered biennially in US history 

Kate Brown (Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County), Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters (Oxford Univ. Press, 2013)

The Morris D. Forkosch Prize in the field of British, British Imperial, or British Commonwealth history since 1485 

Gregory E. O’Malley (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz), Final Passages: The Intercolonial Slave Trade of British America, 1619–1807 (Univ. of North Carolina Press, 2014) 

The William and Edwyna Gilbert Award for the best article on teaching history 

Peter Burkholder (Fairleigh Dickinson Univ.), “A Content Means to a Critical Thinking End: Group Quizzing in History Surveys,” The History Teacher 47, no. 4 (August 2014): 551–78

The J. Franklin Jameson Award offered biennially for the editing of primary sources 

Emily Levine (independent scholar), Witness: A Húŋkpapȟa Historian’s Strong-Heart Song of the Lakotas (Univ. of Nebraska Press, 2013) 

The Littleton-Griswold Prize in US law and society, broadly defined 

Cornelia H. Dayton (Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs) and Sharon V. Salinger (Univ. of California, Irvine), Robert Love’s Warnings: Searching for Strangers in Colonial Boston (Univ. of Pennsylvania Press, 2014) 

The Helen and Howard R. Marraro Prize in Italian history or Italian-American relations 

David I. Kertzer (Brown Univ.), The Pope and Mussolini: The Secret History of Pius XI and the Rise of Fascism in Europe (Random House, 2014)

The John E. O’Connor Film Award for outstanding interpretations of history through film 

Dramatic Feature: 12 Years a Slave, Steve McQueen, director; Brad Pitt, producer (Fox Searchlight Pictures, 2013) 

Documentary: The Ghosts of Amistad: In the Footsteps of the Rebels, Tony Buba, director; Marcus Rediker, producer (Univ. of Pittsburgh, 2014)

The James A. Rawley Prize for the integration of Atlantic worlds before the 20th century 

Ada Ferrer (New York Univ.), Freedom’s Mirror: Cuba and Haiti in the Age of Revolution (Cambridge Univ. Press, 2014) 

Gregory E. O’Malley (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz), Final Passages: The Intercolonial Slave Trade of British America, 1619–1807 (Univ. of North Carolina Press, 2014)

The Dorothy Rosenberg Prize in the history of the Jewish diaspora 

Libby Garland (Kingsborough Community Coll., City Univ. of New York), After They Closed the Gates: Jewish Illegal Immigration to the United States, 1921–1965 (Univ. of Chicago Press, 2014) – 

The Roy Rosenzweig Prize for Innovation in Digital History to a freely available new media project 

The First Days Project, South Asian American Digital Archive

The Eugene Asher Distinguished Teaching Award for outstanding postsecondary history teaching 

Kimberley Mangun (Univ. of Utah)

The Beveridge Family Teaching Prize for distinguished K–12 history teaching 

Kevin A. Wagner (Carlisle Area School District, Carlisle, PA)

The Herbert Feis Award for distinguished contributions to public history

Pamela M. Henson (Smithsonian Institution Archives)

The Nancy Lyman Roelker Mentorship Award for teachers of history who taught, guided, and inspired their students in a way that changed their lives 

Brian Balogh (Univ. of Virginia)

The Award for Scholarly Distinction to senior historians for lifetime achievement 

Ira Berlin (Univ. of Maryland, College Park) 

Nick Bunker Wins the George Washington Book Prize

It is one the nation’s largest literary awards. 

The George Washington Book Prize is awarded every year to the best book on early American history written for a broad audience.  It is sponsored by Washington College, the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, and George Washington’s Mount Vernon.   In 2011, our Was America Founded as a Christian Nation: A Historical Introduction was one of the three finalists. You can read about that amazing experience here and here.

This year’s winner was Nick Bunker’s An Empire on the Edge: How Britain Came to Fight America. Bunker beat out three other books: Richard Dunn’s A Tale of Two Plantations: Slave Life and Labor in Jamaica and Virginia, Francois Furstenberg’s When the United States Spoke French: Five Refugees Who Shaped a Nation, and Eric Nelson’s The Royalist Revolution: Monarchy and the American Founding.

Congratulations!


Here is a taste of the press release:

An Empire on the Edge is a probing account of Great Britain’s internal political and financial tensions on the eve of revolution. Drawing on a careful study of primary sources from Britain and the United States, Bunker crafts a compelling story of the deepening antagonism between England and her colonies, giving equal weight to the commercial as well as the political ambitions of the British Empire.  Bunker’s series of fully visualized scenes of familiar events like the Boston Tea Party and lesser-known episodes such as the Gaspee Affair, provides a nuanced description of the Anglo-American conflict.
An independent scholar in Lincolnshire, England, Bunker was formerly a journalist for theFinancial Times and an investment banker. Bunker’s background in finance is evident in his insightful portrait of London’s speculative cycles, the financial woes of the East India Company, and the networks of global trade that put the imperial system “slipping into ruin.”
In addition to claiming the Washington Book Prize, An Empire on the Edge was recently announced as a finalist for the 2015 Pulitzer Prize in history, earning praise for its “bifocal perspective on the countdown to the American Revolution.” Empire on Edge is Bunker’s second book: he previously authored Making Haste from Babylon: The Mayflower Pilgrims and Their World: A New History (2010).
“Bunker’s book takes readers from the wharves of Boston to the halls of Parliament and the tea plantations of China,” said Adam Goodheart, Hodson Trust-Griswold Director of Washington College’s C.V. Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, which administers the prize. “He shows us that the fate of the American colonies depended on events in all of those places. This is historical narrative at its most vivid and engrossing.”

AHA Prize Winners

The American Historical Association has announced its 2014 prize winners.  Here are a few of them that caught my eye:

The William and Edwyna Gilbert Award for the best article on teaching history goes to Lendol Calder (Augustana College), “The Stories We Tell,” OAH Magazine of History 27, no. 3 (2013): 5–8 

The James A. Rawley Prize for the integration of Atlantic worlds before the 20th century goes to Aaron Spencer Fogleman (Northern Illinois University), Two Troubled Souls: An Eighteenth-Century Couple’s Spiritual Journey in the Atlantic World (University of North Carolina Press, 2013) 

The Wesley-Logan Prize in African diaspora history goes to Jacob S. Dorman (University of Kansas), Chosen People: The Rise of American Black Israelite Religions (Oxford University Press, 2013) 

The Roy Rosenzweig Prize for Innovation in Digital History to a freely available new media project goes to “Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict, 1854–1865″ (Kansas City Public Library) 

Congratulations!