Check Out This Week’s “The Holy Post Podcast”

Holy Post.jpegI chat with Skye Jethani about the evangelical persecution complex.  Here is a summary of the episode:

In a number of recent commencement speeches at Christian colleges, Vice President Mike Pence has been warning graduates about the hostility of our culture toward Christians. Historian John Fea is back to talk about what Pence gets right, and what he gets wrong, about the persecution of evangelicals in the U.S. Plus, Fea shares his theory about why regular church attendees are the most likely to still support Trump. Also this week, an evangelical activist is guilty of “astroturfing” Muslims. Airports try to ban Chick-Fil-A and Hollywood studios boycott states passing abortion restrictions. And is conservative politics killing white churches?

Listen here.

Podcasts Help Historians Speak to the Public

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Are you listening to The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast?  We are heading into the studio today to record an episode on history teaching with special attention to the “Reacting the Past” model.

Over at The Anxious Bench, Chris Gehrz reminds us that podcasts are just another way in which historians are connecting to public audiences.  He writes in the wake of Max Boot’s recent criticism of historians.

Gehrz mentions several history podcasts trying to reach-out beyond the academy.  And The Way of Improvement Leads Home is one of them.  Here is a taste of Gehrz’s post:

Hosts: John Fea, Drew Dyrli Hermeling

Total Episodes: 46

Typical Length: 50-65 minutes

Sample Recent Episode: “A City Upon a Hill

Speaking of engaging hosts… This one is already well known to many readers of this blog, where he used to be a contributor. In many ways, John is the epitome of the 21st century historian: equally at home writing serious scholarly monographs and engaging with any and all comers through digital media.

As he does with a recurring “Author’s Corner” series at his venerable blog, John often uses his podcast to share the work of fellow historians. In this episode, he featured Daniel T. Rodgers, author of a new book on one of the most famous sermons in American history. (Agnes blogged about it at Anxious Bench last November.) John, producer Drew Hermeling, and their guests delve into many aspects of religion, politics, and U.S. history, but TWOILH can range widely, as in the Season 4 episode on the history of the “Memphis sound.”

Perhaps the recurring question of TWOILH is whether the past is “usable.” In the “City Upon a Hill” episode, John added a commentary inspired by the Greenwich Tea Burning of 1774, which he notes has been used to promote everything from the assimilation of immigrants to Cold War anti-Communism to the 21st century version of the Tea Party. (Learn more from John’s 2017 post on the topic for Omohundro, plus an accompanying episode of Ben Franklin’s World.) “The past should always be useful,” John agrees. But he warns that the past may not be usable as we’d like it to be:

…sometimes the past is not easily consumable. Sometimes what happened in previous eras has no direct relevance for our lives today… Sometimes the past introduces us to people whose ideas and behavior we want to forget, rather than resurrect for some modern-day agenda… In the end, good historical thinking requires us to see the past in all its fullness, whether it fits our pet causes or not…. This is why historical thinking is central to our role as citizens in a democracy

Thanks!  And don’t forget to check out Chris’s new podcast on sports and history: “The 252.”  A rumor is circulating that Sportianity‘s own Paul Putz will soon be making an appearance on this podcast.

Teaching History With Podcasts (#AHA19)

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I am happy to have Matt Lakemacher writing for us this weekend from the annual meeting of the American Historical Association in Chicago.  Matt is one of the most engaged middle school teachers I know.  He teaches at Woodland Middle School in Gurnee, Illinois and is a veteran of numerous summer history seminars and institutes.  Here is his first dispatch:

Can podcasting help to stem the tide of declining enrollment in history departments?  For the panelists and audience members in an opening American Historical Association roundtable today on “History Podcasting as Graduate Students,” the answer was a resounding, if qualified, yes.  Producers and hosts from two historical podcasts, Sexing History and The Way of Improvement Leads Home, gave brief remarks on their experiences with history podcasting and then opened it up for audience members to share the ways that they’ve used podcasts in the classroom and with students.  In the end, it became clear that while podcasting (as well as blogging) might not be the silver bullet that saves history education, it can be another tool in the history teacher’s arsenal to make the subject relevant, keep students’ interest, and in jargon that all K-12 educators know their administrators want to hear: promote 21st century skills.

Two dual themes emerged from the panel: podcasting is good for history and history is good for podcasting.  Each panelist related in one way or another how working on a podcast actually improved their work as grad students and as historians.  According to Saniya Lee Ghanoui, podcasting with Sexing History taught her the importance of story-telling and has greatly improved her dissertation writing.  In a similar vein, Devin McGeehan Muchmore shared how blogging for Notches and working on Sexing History got him to think about ways of narrating the past outside of the traditional historical monograph or journal article.  And Drew Dyrli Hermeling credited his work on The Way of Improvement Leads Home with getting a job at the Digital Harrisburg Project. As a whole, the panel embraced the role that podcasting can play in public history – bringing the past to those outside of the academy (although it was conceded that podcasting is still very much a niche medium and can be somewhat of an echo chamber).  Ghanoui offered some advice to her fellow grad students: “It does take away time from your dissertation . . . but it’s a welcome distraction.”  She added, “I love how collaborative it is . . . it is worth it.”

Hermeling set the table for the audience discussion that followed and the pivot to history being good for podcasting, by sharing how he had students in his J-Term class on indigenous culture at Messiah College create a podcast as one option for a project assignment.  He, as well as the audience, made clear that audio quality and production values should not be heavily weighted on any rubric used for grading such an assignment.  But Hermeling was surprised by the quality of the research and sources that students used in their podcast.  “It’s a good way of tricking them into using a lot of citations.”  One audience member admitted that compared to other assignments, grading student podcasts was a pleasure.  Another said that Wisconsin Public Radio was looking to possibly use some of his students’ short pieces on the air.  And everyone who shared during the session had positive experiences doing a podcasting assignment in class, thought the students were engaged, and plan on doing them again.

So, can podcasting turn around sagging interest in history as a K-12 subject and as a major?  Perhaps the jury is still out.  But if it provides another way of getting students to apply historical thinking skills to a (relatively) new technology and opens another venue for bringing historical literacy to the public at large, then it’s an effort well worth pursuing.  As the roundtable’s chair and host of Sexing History Lauren Gutterman stated, “graduate students are at the forefront of history podcasting,” and for that this history teacher and fellow grad student is grateful.  Of course, as Hermeling put it in one final word of advice for potential history podcasters, “At the risk of being flippant, I’d go the Sexing History route.”

The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast is in Chicago for the AHA

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The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast producer Drew Dyrli Hermeling is in the Windy City for the annual meeting of the American Historical Association.  He will be presenting in about three hours.

AHA Session 14

Thursday, January 3, 2019: 1:30 PM-3:00 PM

Williford B (Hilton Chicago, Third Floor)

Chair:

Lauren Gutterman, University of Texas at Austin

Panel:

Saniya Lee Ghanoui, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Andrew Dyrli Hermeling, Lehigh University

Devin McGeehan Muchmore, Harvard University

Session Abstract

There has been a proliferation of history podcasts that are helping historians to engage in new conversations about the past. Graduate students play a vital role in these podcasts, even as they grapple with speedup in graduate education, precarious job prospects, and uneven professional recognition for their public history work. Yet with an acceptance of the discipline’s movement towards digital history, graduate students are at the forefront of this trend as they create, write, and produce podcasts and public history. Coming from the producers of Sexing History and The Way of Improvement Leads Home, we explore both the practical issues encountered with history podcasting and the academic/theoretical ones, as well. Presenters will discuss the practical concerns of conducting public history work through podcasting while, at the same time, balancing dissertation writing and course work; examine the benefits of becoming involved in public history projects as graduate students; and look at how podcasting can benefit broader career preparation. Furthermore, we will discuss the use of podcasts in the classrooms and how they have aided us in new forms of teaching history. We encourage audience members to participate in the discussion and share their own experiences with history podcasts.

The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast Needs Your Support!

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As we enter the end of the year, I hope that some of you might find a space for The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast in your holiday budget!  It’s pretty easy to give a one-time gift or an extended pledge of $1 (shilling), $5 (pound), $10 (sterling), or $20 (gold) more a month.  Just head over to our Patreon site for the details.

Season 5 is well underway.  So far we have chatted with:

  • Historian Robert Whitaker on how the past is interpreted in popular video games.  (Coming next week!)
  • Public historian Chris Graham on race, public history, and religious congregations.
  • Arizona State history professor Catherine O’Donnell on Catholic saint Elizabeth Ann Seton.
  • Georgetown University historian Michael Kazin on the history of populism in America.
  • Messiah College historian Paul Putz on “Sportianity
  • University of Virginia historian Nicole Hemmer on race and history in Charlottesville, Virginia.

We already have some great guests lined-up for the rest of the season, including Sam Wineburg and Daniel Rodgers.

And, of course, previous episodes are always available at your favorite podcatcher.  Listen to interviews with:

  • Nancy Tomes on the history of health care in America
  • Annette Gordon Reed and Peter Onuf on Thomas Jefferson
  • Frances Fitzgerald on the history of American evangelicalism
  • R. Marie Griffith on sexual politics and the Christian Right
  • Amy Bass on the thrilling story of the Somali refugees who won a Maine state high school soccer title
  • Erin Bartram on graduate school in history
  • Randall Stephens on Christian rock music

And many, many more!

Thanks so much for your support.  All pledges and one-time donations go directly into the production of The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast.

Don’t Forget The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast in These Final Hours of “Giving Tuesday”

Podcast

We are not a non-profit, and I can’t offer a tax break, but if you like our work here at this blog or at The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast please consider a one-time gift or an ongoing patronage.  It’s easy to do and all the instructions can be found at our Patreon page. We are really excited about our next three episodes. They will drop before the end of the year.

And yes, mugs and free signed books (including Believe Me!) are still available!  Drew also tells me that T-shirts and other TWOILH gear is on the way!  Stay tuned!

The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast at Harvard’s “Sound Education” Conference

Podcast Conference 2

The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast co-host and producer Drew Hermeling is in Cambridge, Massachusetts this weekend.  He is doing a presentation on the podcast at Sound Education: A Conference for Educational Podcasts and Listeners.  Harvard University is hosting the event.

Here is a description of his session:

Seeing Early America Everywhere: Connecting Eighteenth-Century History to Unexpected Places with Andrew Hermeling (The Way of Improvement Leads Home)
@ Divinity Hall, Room 106

Colonial Puritans and Colin Kaepernick. Mount Vernon and Mar-a-Lago. Eighteenth-century midwifery and Obamacare. These may seem like odd connections, but in their efforts to prove that #everythinghasahistory, early American historians and podcasters John Fea and Drew Dyrli Hermeling regularly demonstrate that today’s hot-button issues have eighteenth-century antecedents. If you look close enough, you can see early America everywhere.

There are some great podcasters at Harvard this weekend.  Here are a few that caught my attention:

Nate DiMeo of The Memory Palace.  (Listen to our interview with Nate in Episode 6 of The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast)

Ed O’Donnell of In the Past Lane

Blair Hodges of the Maxwell Institute Podcast

Marshal Poe of New Books Network

Liz Covart of Ben Franklin’s World (Listen to our interview with Liz in Episode 24 of The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast)

Dan Carlin of Hardcore History

We will try to get Drew to write a report of the conference and post it here.  Stay tuned.

Podcast Conference 1

It looks like Drew is playing to a good crowd

Season 5 of The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast is Right Around the Corner!

We are in the studio this week recording episodes for Season 5 of The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast.

Like Season 4, we have some GREAT guests in the queue.  As always, we NEED YOUR HELP.  Learn how you can support high-quality American history podcasting here.   All supporters are eligible for a The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast mug or a signed copy of one of my books, including Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump.  Here are some pics:

Podcast on stage

A shot from our first live episode

Ally Podcast

A fan on the campus of Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Michigan

Mug in Florida

Florida during Hurricane Irma

graham-mug

I believe this is in Richmond, Virginia

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bta-students

Some of these students from Boston Trinity Academy were guests on Episode 31

Lowrie

Season 4 studio producer Josh Lowrie has graduated.  We will be announcing his replacement soon

Nilsa

Don’t forget our intern, Nilsa

Shannon

We interview some great authors!

Stephens Book

fun

Sometimes Drew gets very excited about our episodes

Moral combat

Drew and Josh

Drew and Josh doing their thing

Fitz

Occasionally a Pulitzer Prize-winner shows-up on our airwaves

XM

People love listening to the podcast on road trips

Brenda

It’s always great to meet TWOILH patrons when I’m on the road.  

 

The New Season of The Way of Improvement Leads Podcast is Almost Here!

Mug in Florida

A TWOILH podcast patron from Florida shows-off her mug (and generator) during Hurricane Irma

We are gearing up for Season 5 of The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast.  Stay tuned.  New episodes are almost here!

If you are interested in conversations and commentary with some great historians and historical thinkers, you are not going to want to miss this upcoming season.  We hope you will download episodes, write reviews of the show at your favorite podcast sites, and share the podcast with your friends.  We also invite you to support us financially.  The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast is funded primarily by listeners.  Check out how you can contribute at our Patreon page.  All donor money, of course, goes to the production and development of the podcast.  It is used to pay our producer and studio engineer.

We accept pledges and one-time gifts.  And you may be eligible for a free The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast coffee mug or a free signed book (including Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump).

Here is a quick summary of all of our episodes:

SEASON 1:

Episode 1:  Jim Grossman, the Executive Director of the American Historical Society, reminds us that “Everything Has a History.”

Episode 2: Historian Daniel Williams talks about the history of the pro-life movement in America.

Episode 3: Yoni Appelbaum, Ideas Editor at The Atlantic, helps us think historically about electoral politics.

Episode 4: Stanford’s Sam Wineburg talks about historical thinking “and other unnatural acts.”

Episode 5: Tim Grove of the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum talks about museums and writing history for children.

Episode 6:  Nate DiMeo of the wildly popular podcast “The Memory Place” talks about telling stories about the past.

Episode 7: Paul Lukas of ESPN talks about history, memory, nostalgia, and sports uniforms.

Episode 8: Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Annette Gordon Reed and Peter Onuf discuss the complex life and legacy of Thomas Jefferson.

Episode 9: Author Marc Dolan discusses the historical, political, and spiritual significance of Bruce Springsteen.

SEASON 2:

Episode 10:  Thomas Jefferson living history interpreter Steve Edenbo talks about what it is like to be a Jefferson re-enactor in a post-Hamilton world.

Episode 11: Historian Ann Little reflects on the writing of biography through the 18th-century life of Esther Wheelright.

Episode 12: Slate‘s Rebecca Onion talks about bringing good history to the public.

Episode 13: NPR reporter Sarah McCammon tells us what it is like to follow Donald Trump on the campaign trail.

Episode 14: Historian Amy Bass joins us to talk Olympics, baseball, and sports history.

Episode 15: Jonathan Fetter-Vorm, the co-author and illustrator of Battle Lines: A Graphic History of the Civil War, discusses graphic novels as a way of communicating history to the public.

Episode 16: Award-winning historian Manisha Sinha teaches us about the history of abolitionist movement.

SEASON 3:

Episode 17: Douglas Bradburn, CEO of Mount Vernon, talks with us about George Washington and his Virginia estate.

Episode 18: Historian Bruce Berglund discusses religion and culture in 20th century Prague and we explore the internationalization of American history.

Episode 19: Documentary filmmaker Martin Doblmeier talks about his film: An American Conscience: The Reinhold Niebuhr Story.

Episode 20: Historian Adrian Burgos Jr., editor-in-chief of La Vida Baseball, tackles race, ethnicity, and American baseball.

Episode 21: Scott Hartley, author of The Fuzzy and the Techie: Why the Liberal Arts will Rule the Digital World, argues that we need more historians in the Silicon Valley.

Episode 22: Bancroft Prize-winning historian Nancy Tomes discusses the history of health-care in America.

Episode 23: Amanda Moniz of the Smithsonian National Museum of American History talks about the history of philanthropy in the United States.

Episode 24: Podcaster Liz Covart talks about podcasting and her popular podcast Ben Franklin’s World.

SEASON 4:

Episode 25:  Kelly Baker, a historian of the KKK, helps us put the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia into historical context.

Episode 26: Kevin Gannon, aka “The Tatooed Prof,” talks history pedagogy and introduces us to his “Teaching Manifesto.”

Episode 27: Historian Julian Chambliss interprets Trump’s “Mar-a-Lago in the context of Florida history, environmental history, and populism.

Episode 28: We talk soul music with Jeff Kollath, executive director of the Stax Museum in Memphis.

Episode 29: National Book Award finalist Nancy MacLean discusses libertarianism and the threat to democracy.

Episode 30: Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Francis Fitzgerald discusses the history of American evangelicalism.

Episode 31:  History teacher Mike Milway and his students talk about historical thinking in the classroom and the mission of Boston Trinity Academy.

Episode 32: Historian R. Marie Griffith discusses the links between sexual politics and evangelicalism in modern America.

Episode 33: Historian Amy Bass tells us the story of an amazing group of Somali refugees and their quest to win the Maine state soccer championship.

Episode 34: Princeton historian Kevin Kruse tells us what it is like to be a prominent Twitterstorian.

Episode 35: Historian Bruce Berglund is back to talk about his new project on global ice hockey.

Episode 36: Historian Timothy Shannon introduces us to Peter Williamson, an 18th-century life that spans both sides of the Atlantic.

Episode 37: Historian Erin Bartram, the author of the viral blog post “The Sublimated Grief of the Left Behind,” helps us answer the question: “Should You Go to Graduate School?”

Episode 38: Randall Stephens talks about the complicated relationship between Christianity and rock ‘n’ roll.

Bonus Live Episode:  John and Drew talk about the podcast and digital humanities at the Messiah College Educator’s Day.

The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast is on Summer Break, But We Still Need Your Help!

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Season Four  at The Way of Improvement Leads Home podcast is a wrap! We will be back later this month with two bonus episodes (stay tuned!), but we are done recording episodes.  I am writing because we could really use your hope as we start preparing for the possibility of a fifth season. in the Fall.

For those unfamiliar, the podcast brings interviews and commentary related to American history, historical thinking, and the role of history in our everyday lives. In each episode we talk to someone doing innovative, creative, and thoughtful work in American history.  Our guests include historians, authors, filmmakers, museum professionals, teachers, public intellectuals, podcasters, and journalists.

Our guests have included:

  • Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Frances Fitzgerald on American evangelicalism
  • National Book award finalist Nancy MacLean on libertarianism and democracy
  • Bancroft Prize-winning historian Nancy Tomes on the history of American healthcare
  • Historian R. Marie Griffith on sexual politics
  • Historian Amy Bass on sports and community
  • Author Scott Hartley on the need for the humanities in the Silicon Valley
  • Filmmaker Martin Doblmeier on Reinhold Niebuhr
  • Mount Vernon CEO Doug Bradburn on George Washington’s legacy
  • National Book award finalist Manisha Sinha on the history of abolitionism
  • NPR reporter Sarah McCammon on covering Donald Trump
  • Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Annette Gordon-Reed on Thomas Jefferson
  • ESPN writer Paul Lukacs on nostalgia and the history of sports uniforms
  • Stanford professor Sam Wineburg on historical thinking and public schools
  • Atlantic editor Yoni Appelbaum on presidential politics and “useable pasts.”

And much, much more!

The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast relies on the support of patrons like you.  If you appreciate what we do, please consider heading over to our Patreon page and joining our support team!

And yes, mugs and books are still available!

Our First Live Episode of The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast is in the Books!

Podcast on stageThis morning we recorded our first live episode of The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast before the Community of Educators (faculty and co-curricular educators) at Messiah College.

The Community of Educators gathered today at “Educator’s Day,” a tradition in which our faculty and co-curricular educators mark the end of the previous year and turn our attention to developing ourselves for the year ahead.  The theme of this year’s Educator’s Day was “Flourishing in a Digital World.”

As I noted in my post this morning, the administration asked us to record an episode of the podcast related to this theme.   Our guests were three humanities scholars doing very creative work at the intersection of digital scholarship and place.  David Pettegrew runs Messiah College’s Digital Harrisburg Initiative, Jean Corey runs Messiah’s Center for Public Humanities, and Nathan Skulstad is a digital documentarian and story-teller.

We could not have done this live episode without the hard work of podcast producer Drew Dyrli Hermeling and Cynthia Wells, the director of the Ernest L. Boyer Center at Messiah.  Thanks as well to Ashley Sheaffer of the Messiah College Agape Center for interviewing me on the episode and the skilled technicians on the Messiah College sound team for making us sound good!

Stay tuned.  This bonus episode will drop sometime in the next few weeks.  In the meantime, head over to Patreon site and help get us to Season 5.

Some tweets:

And Drew’s excellent response to Mr. Hatfield’s snarky tweet:

Welcome Messiah College Community of Educators!

Parmer

Parmer Hall, Messiah College

When this post appears on the blog (9:50am on Monday, May 20, 2018) I will be sitting with Drew Dyrli Hermeling on the magnificent stage of Parmer Hall at Messiah College hosting a special episode of The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast.  The episode is being recorded right now in front of a live studio audience at Messiah’s “Educator’s Day.”  Every year, Messiah College’s community of educators gather on the Monday following graduation for a day of professional development.  This year’s theme is “Flourishing in a Digital Age” and the administration has asked me to dedicate a podcast episode to digital scholarship and teaching at Messiah College.

We have done 38 full episodes of the podcast thus far.  I have interviewed Pulitzer Prize–winning authors and all kinds of other important people in the history field, but I have never been more nervous than I am this morning.  There is something different about having to host this podcast in front of a few hundred of my colleagues!

I think it is fair to say that most Messiah College educators are not familiar with the blog or the podcast.  Many will be finding their way to http://www.thewayofimprovement.com from their phones and laptops as they listen to us recording the podcast on stage. If you are one of those educators, welcome to our online home!  Feel free to explore a bit and get acquainted with what we have been doing here for the last ten years!  🙂

Thanks for Supporting The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast

Podcast

I just checked the Patreon crowdfunding page for The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast and noticed that we have picked up a few extra patrons over the past few weeks.  If you are one of them, thank you for your support!!

It takes a lot of work to produce a podcast.  I write every episode.  Our producer Drew Dyrli Hermeling schedules the guests, works with our hosts at Recorded History Podcast, schedules our recording sessions, works with our patrons to get them free goodies, edits every episode, and, most importantly, provides creative energy to make this thing happen.

We could not live without our studio producer Josh Lowrie.  He is a master of the sound board and spends several hours on every episode taking out all of our mistakes and making us and our guests sound good.  He also reserves the studio.

The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast is a labor of love, but we still have expenses. At this point, I do not make a cent on the podcast.  Most of the support we received via Patreon helps pay for the production work of Drew and Josh, but even that is not enough.

We were able to launch the podcast with a gift from an angel donor.  That money is now almost gone and we are in the process of trying to figure out how to move forward without it.

This is where you can help.  In addition to sharing the podcast on your social media feeds, reviewing it at ITunes or another podcatcher, and downloading episodes, we also need financial supporters.

For those new to the podcast, we are committed to landing great guests who are doing all kinds of amazing history-related things.  Here are just a few of the folks we have talked to over the last four seasons:

  • Princeton University historian Kevin Kruse on life as a #twitterstorian
  • Sports historian Amy Bass on her new book One Goal
  • Historian of American religion R. Marie Griffiths on her new book on sexual politics and American evangelicalism
  • Pulitzer prize-winner Francis Fitzgerald on American evangelicals
  • National Book Award finalist Nancy MacLean on libertarianism and democracy
  • Bancfroft Prize-winning historian Nancy Tomes on the history of healthcare
  • National Book Award finalist Manisha Sinha on the history of abolitionism
  • Pulitzer prize-winner Annette Gordon Reed on Thomas Jefferson
  • Historical thinking guru Sam Wineburg on teaching history in schools
  • The Atlantic‘s Washington Bureau Chief Yoni Appelbaum on history and politics.

And much, much more!!!!

Please consider heading over to our Patreon page and become a patron or make a one-time donation!  Thank you.