Princeton Seminar: Day 2

Gilder 2019 Day 2 Nate

2019 National History Teacher of the Year Nathan McAlister is getting us ready to dive into our morning lectues.

Day 2 of the Gilder-Lehrman Institute of American History summer seminar on colonial America is in the books.  This morning I challenged the teachers to think about the colonial period on its own terms.  What kind of stories would we tell about colonial America if the American Revolution never happened?  Whose voices would count?  How do we avoid our natural inclination to dabble in Whig history–an approach to the colonial America that privileges the way in which the colonies contributed to the rise of American democracy, American exceptionalism, and American institutions?

We also discussed the economic factors that prompted European exploration and colonization of North America and how such mercantilistic endeavors brought changes to native American cultures.  I asked the students to think about some of the major interpretive frameworks of the New Indian History:  “Facing East,” the “Middle Ground,” and the “Indians New World.”

GIlder 2019 Day 2

Nate McAlister, our master-teacher, took-over in the afternoon.  He is working with the teachers on creating colonial-era lesson plans. The teachers seemed energized.  I wandered into Labyrinth Books on Nassau Street around 4:30pm and found a dozen or so teachers, after seven hours in the classroom, swarming the American history section. It doesn’t get any better than this!  🙂

Thunderstorms and a flash-flood warning in the Princeton area forced us to reschedule our tour of historic Princeton.   We will try again on Thursday night.

Tomorrow we will focus on the Chesapeake, New England, and the Middle Colonies.

On the Road in Late July

Fea at Mount Vernon

Mount Vernon Museum

I am in the at the midpoint of two weeks of work with the Gilder-Lehrman Institute of American History.  As some of you know, this last week I was in Mount Vernon, Virginia and Boston filming a 12-week lecture course on colonial America for elementary school history and social studies teachers.  We filmed the lectures in a hotel in Framingham, Massachusetts and filmed five-minute lecture introductions in the tobacco fields and at the slave quarters at Mount Vernon, the Reynolds Museum at Mount Vernon, the Boston Long Wharf, Old South Meetinghouse, King’s Chapel Burial Ground, the Massachusetts State House, Harvard University, the Boston Public Library, and Boston College.  It was hot and the work was rigorous (one day I gave five 50-minutes lectures to a camera!), but this kind of work is rewarding and hopefully useful to teachers–the men and women on the front lines of preserving, sustaining, and strengthening our democracy.

Fea at Mansion

Thanks to the Gilder-Lehrman Institute for the opportunity to work on this course.  And special thanks to Sarah Jannarone and Peter Shea of Gilder-Lehrman and Garrett Kafchinski of Diagonal Media for all their hard work this week.

I understand that this course will be published at the Gilder-Lehrman website as part of its forthcoming “History Essentials” series sometime next year. Stay tuned

Fea Boston Public

With a 1656 map of New Spain at the Boston Public Library map room

Tomorrow I will be back in Princeton for what is becoming an annual event:  the Gilder Lehrman Institute summer seminar on Colonial America.  Stay tuned.  I will be blogging every day from Princeton.  (Click here to see some of my posts from 2018).  As always, I will be working with Nate McAlister. Nate is my partner-in-crime, a high school history teacher in Kansas, and the 2010 National History Teacher of the Year!

Here are some pics from 2018. I am hoping for another great week:

Princeton--Philly Trip

Philadelphia bound!

Princeton-Nate

Nate with a Dunlap Broadside of the Declaration of Independence

Princeton-Boudreau

In Philadelphia I introduced the teachers to the legendary George Boudreau

 

Princeton--Kidd

We ran into esteemed early American religious historian Thomas Kidd and some of his students in the Princeton graveyard

Princeton--Why

What James Loewen Needs to Learn About History Education

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Many of the readers of this blog are familiar with James Loewen, the author of the popular 1995 book Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong.  In the introduction to a recent interview with Loewen in The Atlantic, journalist Alia Wong described Loewen’s approach in Lies:

In 1995, the University of Vermont sociologist and historian James W. Loewen published a book that sought to debunk the myriad myths children were often taught about the United States’ past. Framed largely as a critique of the history education delivered in America’s classrooms but also serving as a history text itself, Lies My Teacher Told Mewas the result of Loewen’s analysis of a dozen major high-school textbooks. It found that those materials frequently taught students about topics including the first Thanksgiving, the Civil and Vietnam Wars, and the Americas before Columbus arrived in incomplete, distorted, or otherwise flawed ways. Take, for example, the false yet relatively widespread conviction that the Reconstruction era was a chaotic period whose tumult was attributable to poor, uncivilized governance of recently freed slaves. Textbooks’ framing of the history in this way, according to Loewen, promoted racist attitudes among white people. White supremacists in the South, for example, repeatedly cited this interpretation of Reconstruction to justify the prevention of black people from voting.

Wong’s interview with Loewen is occasioned by the release of a new paperback edition of Lies My Teacher Told Me.  You can read the interview here.

As I read the interview I was struck by how much emphasis Loewen places on the textbook as a measure of the state of history education in schools.  He seems to be unaware of the changes that have taken place in history education since he first published Lies nearly a quarter-century ago.

Anyone familiar with the work of the Stanford History Education Group or the Gilder-Lehrman Institute of American History knows that effective history teaching requires teachers to challenge or confirm narratives about the past through the close reading of primary sources and the critical reading of textbooks.

After reading Wong’s interview with Loewen, I ran across a Facebook post written by Nate McAlister, a history teacher in Kansas, 2010 National History Teacher of the Year, and my partner in the Gilder-Lehrman Institute’s “Colonial Era” summer seminar for teachers held each year at Princeton.  Here is his response to Wong’s interview with Loewen and Lies My Teacher Told Me:

I like and dislike the article. And I agree and disagree with Loewen. His analysis based solely on the textbook discounts one major factor, the teacher in the room. He assumes that every history teacher cracks open the textbook and calls it a day. I do agree, that textbooks narratives are often poorly written or plain wrong. I also agree, that if a teacher is reliant on only the textbook the results will be as he stated, poor. But I don’t think this is where history education is in this country. I believe that history teachers are some of the best in the field. I believe that history teachers push students, daily, to think critically and challenged the given narrative. In essence, we—history teachers—are more than the textbook.

“I don’t think this is where history education is in this country.”  Well put.