Bancroft Prize-Winning Historian Nancy Tomes is Coming to Messiah College Next Week!

Tomes Poster

If you are in the area on Thursday evening, September 27, join us for the 2018 Messiah College American Democracy Lecture.  This year’s lecturer is Nancy Tomes of the State University of New York at Stony Brook.  In 2017, Tomes was awarded the Bancroft Prize in American History for her book Remaking the American Patient: How Madison Avenue and Modern Medicine Turned Patients Into Consumers.  Tomes’s American Democracy Lecture is titled “Doctor Shoppers: From Problem Patients to Model Citizens.”  The lecture will take place at 7:00pm in the Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts, Parmer Hall on the campus of Messiah College.  Free tickets are required.  To reserve tickets call 717-691-6036 or reserve tickets online at messiah.edu/tickets.

If you want a taste of what you might expect at the lecture, listen to our interview with Tomes in Episode 22 of The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast.

If you are a health-care professional or someone who is interested in our current health care debates, this lecture is for you.  I will see you there.

Bancroft Prize-Winning Historian of Health Care Nancy Tomes is Coming to Messiah College

Nancy Tomes is Distinguished Professor of History at Stony Brook University.  Her 2016 book, Remaking the American Patient: How Madison Avenue and Modern Medicine Turned Patients into Consumers won the prestigious Bancroft Prize in American history.

“This is like a dream come true.”

On September 27, Tomes will deliver the 2018 Messiah College American Democracy Lecture at 7:00pm in Parmer Hall.  If you are in the area you will not want to miss this lecture!  See you there.  Stay tuned for more details.

Listen to Tomes discuss her book on The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast.

Tomes

 

Some Historical Perspective on Our Health Care Debate (and Another Plug for the Podcast)

TomesI know our patrons are eagerly awaiting the drop of The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast patrons-only episodes.

I am happy to announce that our first such summer episode, which focuses on Civil Rights Movement tourism, will be available on Sunday.  If you are a patron, stay tuned for more directions.  I am sure you will be hearing from our trusty producer very soon.

Not a patron of the podcast?  It’s not too late to get these special episodes and all the other great perks that come with being part of our support community (including books and mugs!). Click here.

Whether you are a patron or not, I encourage you to go back and check out Episode 22–“The History of American Healthcare.”  Our guest on this episode is Nancy Tomes, Professor of History at Stony Brook University (SUNY) and author of the Bancroft Prize-winning book Remaking the American Patient: How Madison Avenue and Modern Medicine Turned Patients into Consumers.  Tomes’s book and interview provide some much needed historical perspective on what is going on in Washington D.C.  right now.

The Tomes interview is representative of the kind of history interviews you will get every other week at The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast.

Historicizing Healthcare With Bancroft Prize-Winner Nancy Tomes

TomesEpisode 22 of The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast will drop on Sunday.  Our guest is Professor Nancy Tomes of the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Tomes is the recipient of the 2017 Bancroft Prize for her book Remaking the American Patient: How Madison Avenue and Modern Medicine Turned Patients into Consumers.  We are thrilled to have her on the show not only because she wrote a very timely award-winning book, but also because she was a member of my doctoral dissertation committee. (Needless to say, this comes up in the episode!)

With Tomes as our guest, we are devoting the entire episode to the history of healthcare.  Stay tuned.

And if you like what we are doing at The Way of Improvement Leads Home Podcast, please consider supporting our efforts by heading over to our Patreon site and making a pledge. Good American history is always needed, but it is especially important in times of great political and social change.

The production of a quality podcast can get expensive. Our goal is to get The Way of Improvement Leads Home on solid financial footing so we can move forward and continue to deliver solid American history programming with great guests.

If you can’t support us financially, please consider writing a review of the podcast at ITunes or your favorite podcast site, sending out a tweet or Facebook message telling your friends about our work, or subscribing to the podcast.

Thanks!

Nancy Tomes Wins the Bancroft Prize

TomesI can now say that I am a student of a Bancroft Prize winner!

I am very excited to learn that Nancy Tomes, one of my graduate school mentors and one of my favorite people in the profession,  is one of three winners of this prestigious prize in American History.

Here a taste of New York Times reporter Jennifer Schuessler’s article on the winners:

Books on the 1971 Attica prison uprising, the enslavement of Native Americans, and the health care system have won this year’s Bancroft Prize, considered one of the most prestigious honors in the field of American history.

Andrés Reséndez, a professor at the University of California, Davis, won for “The Other Slavery: The Uncovered Story of Indian Enslavement in America” (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt), which argues that it was mass slavery at the hands of Spanish conquistadors, rather than epidemics, that devastated the Native American population.

Heather Ann Thompson, a professor at the University of Michigan, won for “Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy” (Pantheon), which drew on extensive documentation, including some that had never been seen before by scholars, to reconstruct the violent retaking of the prison and its decades-long legal aftermath.

Nancy Tomes, a professor at Stony Brook University, won for “Remaking the American Patient: How Madison Avenue and Modern Medicine Turned Patients Into Consumers” (University of North Carolina Press), which examined the origins of the notion that patients should “shop” for health care.

I took two research seminars with Nancy while doing my doctoral work at the State University of New York at Stony Brook.  In the first seminar I wrote a paper that was eventually published as “Wheelock’s World: Letters and the Communication of Revival in Great Awakening New England,” Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society (1999).  The second seminar paper I wrote for Nancy resulted in a chapter of my doctoral dissertation on religion in eighteenth-century New Jersey.  Later she served as a member of my dissertation committee (which was directed by Ned Landsman).  Her support and encouragement of my work was invaluable to me as a graduate student hoping to make it in the history profession.

Congratulations Nancy Tomes!