African American History in the *Journal of American History*

JAHAs part of its Black History Month coverage, the blog of the Organization of American Historians has published an index of every article published on African American history in the Journal of American History.  Read the index here.

Here are a few of the articles included:

Charles Ramsdell, “The Natural Limits of Slavery Expansion” (1929)

Emma Lou Thornbrough, “The Brownsville Episode and the Negro Vote” (1957)

Benjamin Quarles, “The Colonial Militia and Negro Manpower” (1959)

Donald Mathews, “The Methodist Mission to the Slaves, 1829–1844” (1965)

James McPherson, “Abolitionists and the Civil Rights Act of 1875” (1965)

C. Vann Woodward, “Clio with Soul” (1969)

Edmund Morgan, “Slavery and Freedom: The American Paradox” (1972)

Eugene Genovese and Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, “The Slave Economies in Political Perspective” (1979)

Peter Kolchin, “Reevaluating the Antebellum Slave Community: A Comparative Perspective” (1981)

Leon Litwack, “Trouble in Mind: The Bicentennial and the Afro-American Experience” (1987)

James H. Cone, “Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Third World” (1987)

Eric Foner, “Rights and the Constitution in Black Life during the Civil War and Reconstruction” (1987)

John Hope Franklin, “Afro-American History: State of the Art” (1988)

David W. Blight, ““For Something Beyond the Battlefield”: Frederick Douglass and the Memory of the Civil War”

Linda Gordon, “Black and White Visions of Welfare: Women’s Welfare Activism, 1890–1945” (1991)

Nell Irvin Painter, “Representing Truth: Sojourner Truth’s Knowing and Becoming Known” (1994)

Mary Dudziak, “Josephine Baker, Racial Protest, and the Cold War” (1994)

Thomas Sugrue, “Crabgrass-Roots Politics: Race, Rights, and the Reaction against Liberalism in the Urban North, 1940–1964” (1995)

Daniel Mandell, “Shifting Boundaries of Race and Ethnicity: Indian-BlackIntermarriage in Southern New England, 1760–1880” (1998)

Walter Johnson, “The Slave Trader, the White Slave, and the Politics of Racial Determination in the 1850s” (2000)

Ira Berlin, “Presidential Address: American Slavery in History and Memory and the Search for Social Justice” (2004)

Lani Guinier, “From Racial Liberalism to Racial Literacy: Brown v. Board of Education and the Interest-Divergence Dilemma” (2004)

Jacquelyn Dowd Hall, “Presidential Address: The Long Civil Rights Movement and the Political Uses of the Past” (2005)

Kenneth Minkema and Harry Stout, “The Edwardsean Tradition and the Antislavery Debate, 1740–1865” (2005)

Kate Masur, ““A Rare Phenomenon of Phiological Vegetation”: The Word “Contraband” and the Meanings of Emancipation in the United States” (2007)

Mark M. Smith, “Getting in Touch with Slavery and Freedom” (2008)

Dorothy Ross, “Lincoln and the Ethics of Emancipation: Universalism, Nationalism, Exceptionalism” (2009)

Mark Neely, “Lincoln, Slavery, and the Nation” (2009)

Penial Joseph, “The Black Power Movement: A State of the Field” (2009)

Nicholas Guyatt, “America’s Conservatory: Race, Reconstruction, and the Santo Domingo Debate” (2011)

Patricia Bonomi, “  “Swarms of Negroes Comeing about My Door”: Black Christianity in Early Dutch and English North America” (2016)

Benjamin Irvin is the New Editor of the *Journal of American History*

irvinThe Organization of American Historians has announced that Benjamin Irvin, currently of the University of Arizona, will be the new editor of the Journal of American HistoryAs many of you know, the Journal is the most important scholarly journal of American history in the world.

Congrats, Ben!

Here is the formal announcement:

The OAH is pleased to announce that Benjamin H. Irvin, associate professor at the University of Arizona, has been named the new Executive Editor of the Journal of American History and associate professor in the department of history at Indiana University, Bloomington. He is the author of Clothed in Robes of Sovereignty: The Continental Congress and the People Out of Doors (2011). Irvin has worked on the editorial boards or staffs of Common-Place: The Journal of Early American Life, History Compass, and the Journal of American History. He is also a Distinguished Lecturer with the Organization of American Historians.

Irvin will begin his term as Executive Editor of the Journal of American History in August 2017.

Benjamin Carp on Edmund Morgan’s “Slavery and Freedom”

Morgan

Edmund Morgan

As some of you may recall, Edmund Morgan’s 1972 Journal of American History article “Slavery and Freedomwon the 2016 Junto Blog “March Madness” tournament for the best journal article in early American history.

Over at Process: A Blog for American History (the official blog of the Organization of American Historians), Ben Carp of Brooklyn College reflects on the significance of Morgan’s essay.  I can’t think of a better person to do this right now.  Carp recently published a great essay on Morgan in Reviews in American History and has been tweeting about Morgan in honor of what would have been his 100th birthday (Morgan died in 2013). Follow along at #edmorgan100

Here is a taste of Carp’s post:

“Slavery and Freedom” is an article about Puritans, even though it doesn’t mention them at all; it’s about what happens when you try to colonize a place without them.

The article purports to be about how the Revolutionary leaders’ “dedication to human liberty and dignity” arose alongside “a system of labor that denied human dignity and liberty every hour of the day.” And indeed, we largely remember the piece for articulating “the central paradox of American history”: how the United States emerged as a beacon of freedom when so many African-Americans remained in chains, with entangled repercussions that still define the nation.

And yet the article spends surprisingly little time on the ideals of the Declaration of Independence or Virginia’s slave society, and neither does American Slavery, American Freedom. It’s an irony that Edmund S. Morgan (1916–2013), the article’s author, would have appreciated (call it the “the ‘Paradox’ paradox”): how an unintended argument became his most enduring legacy.

“Slavery and Freedom” began life as Morgan’s presidential address to the Organization of American Historians in April 1972. Morgan had analyzed the Puritan work ethic and the way that the Founders applied it to their rebellion. But when he tried to attribute the ethic to elite slaveowners like Thomas Jefferson, he realized the argument wouldn’t quite hold. So he looked more closely at history of early colonial Virginia to figure out why the South turned out differently. “Slavery and Freedom” was primarily interested in the problems of work and discipline, which led Morgan into discussions of English ideas about debt and idleness, Francis Drake and the Cimarrons, the cultivation of tobacco, the fate of laborers who completed their indentures, and Bacon’s Rebellion.

Read the rest here.

One and Done

jmm16In case you haven’t seen the First Round results in the 2016 Junto March Madness tournament, my article “The Way of Improvement Leads Home: Philip Vickers Fithian’s Rural Enlightenment (JAH 2003lost to Jon Butler’s “Enthusiasm Described and Decried: The Great Awakening as Intepretive Fiction,” (JAH 1982).  Butler received 58% of the vote.  I received 42%.

Here is a taste of the Junto results summary:

It was an interesting first round, everybody. 168 of you voted, which, as you’ll see, was a real problem in one of our brackets. Upsets occurred in every category, and we had our first ever March Madness tie. Read on for your results!In the Atlantic World, Warsh surged at the end to defeat Gould. Things got complicated, as they tend to, in the Gender bracket, where Camp and Hughes Dayton tied (more on how we’re dealing with this, below). In Economic and Social History Rao smoked Hartog, and in the American Revolution Brown beat out Jasanoff. The History of Ideas had two upsets; Junto supporter Fea lost to Butler, despite a strong Twitter game, and Kloppenberg lost to Grasso. In Native American history Barr upset Greer, and in Slavery and Race Formation Waldstreicher just beat out Johnson. Our Historiography and Theory bracket was the only bracket in which the seeds performed as anticipated. It’s shaping up to be an exciting tournament!

I am still not sure how my article received a #1 seed in the “History of Ideas” category.  It is perhaps even stranger that Butler’s article received a #8 seed.  So I guess, technically, the Butler victory was an “upset.”  Although any early American scholar worth his or her salt knows that Butler was the favorite.

Oh well.  We made a nice run.  Thanks to everyone who voted for Philip Vickers Fithian and the “rural Enlightenment.”  I hope that everyone who voted for my article will now throw their support behind Butler in the “History of Ideas” bracket.  His 1982 article really did shape the field.

 

Did You Vote Today?

The last I checked there are no presidential primaries scheduled for today.

But there is still voting to be done.  Head over to the Junto blog and cast your vote for the best academic journal article published in the field of early American history. And when you are there, help us pull off what just might be the greatest upset in the history of academia!

 

 

Not sure what these tweets mean?  Click here.

The “Rural Enlightenment” Lands a Spot in the Junto March Madness Tournament

jmm16My 2003 Journal of American History article “The Way of Improvement Leads Home: Philip Vickers Fithian’s Rural Enlightenment” landed a spot in the 2016 Junto blog’s March Madness tournament focuses on journal articles.

We landed in the “History of Ideas” bracket as the #1 seed!  We are thrilled with our seed, even though I really don’t understand how it happened since James Kloppenberg, Gordon Wood, Daniel Walker Howe, Trish Loughran, Natalie Caron, and Naomi Wulf are also in this bracket.

Actually, I think the committee at the Junto is playing a cruel trick on me.  Our first round opponent is Jon Butler’s “Enthusiasm Described and Decried: The Great Awakening as Interpretive Fiction.” Butler’s 1982 Journal of American History article has to be one of the most cited articles in recent history.  How can I compete?  I feel like Lincoln Chaffee or Jim Gilmore.

And why is Butler’s article an 8th seed?  Also, how can I rally my readers to support my “rural Enlightenment” article as a dark horse candidate when we are a #1 seed?

OK, enough griping.  We have our task before us. It is time to pull off one of the greatest upsets in the history of Junto March Madness.  Stay tuned.

I Think I Just Found My Campaign Manager

Jay Eldred is a “book-reading, coffee-drinking, marathon-running history teacher who blogs at Running in My Head.

I don’t think I have ever met Jay, but I am officially appointing him as my campaign manager for the Junto Blog’s March Madness tournament! 🙂

Here is a taste of his recent post at Running in my Head:

The championship college basketball tournament brings out the best and worst of everyone as teams vie for supremacy. Go Huskies!

The game has spawned several copycats, but perhaps none so academic as The Junto’s March Madness – a tournament of journal articles.

The tournament is still open for nominations, but only until tomorrow (Sunday, March 6) at 5:00 PM EST.

Not sure what to nominate? I humbly suggest “The Way of Improvement Leads Home: Philip Vickers Fithian’s Rural Enlightenment” by John Fea.

Speaking of John Fea, if you teach history / social studies you should subscribe to his blogand listen to his podcast. He really does a wonderful job examining the intersection of academic study with the reality of teaching living, breathing human beings.

My 2003 JAH article has been nominated and “seconded.”  Now all we can do is sit and wait to see if the committee gives us a spot in the field of 64!