The Anselm House at the University of Minnesota is Hiring an Associate Director of University Engagement

anselm

Back in March 2011, I had a great visit to the Anselm House (at the time it was called the MacLaurin Institute) at the University of Minnesota.  I gave a lecture on the U of M campus, met with campus ministers and members of the U of M History Department, and spoke at a couple of churches.  Brian Bademan, a Notre Dame Ph.D in American history and the director of the Anselm House, hosted my visit.  I blogged about those visits here and here.

I am happy to report that the Anslem House is hiring an Associate Director of University Engagement.  I have posted the ad below.  This looks like a great position for a person of Christian faith who has a passion for promoting Christianity and the intellectual life at a major research university.

Thanks to the generosity of many donors and partnering churches, Anselm House is beginning 2019 from a position of strength, having received more than $347,000 in support from individual donors between July 1-December 31. This outpouring of generosity represents 54% of our June 30, 2019 fundraising goal, putting AnselmHouse’s development efforts ahead of schedule. The study center is serving more students, faculty, and staff at the University of Minnesota than ever before, and this is all due to God’s generous providence working through the Anselm House community. On behalf of our trustees, staff, volunteers, and those whom we serve,thank you for your commitment to advancing this critical mission to the University of Minnesota!

We are also very excited to announce that Anselm House is seeking an Associate Director of University Engagement. This position is funded through a generous three-year grant, and we intend this position to become a permanent part of our team beyond the grant period. Please be sure to forward the announcement below to any family, friends, or acquaintances who may be interested!

The Associate Director of University Engagement will be responsible for developing programs that engage the most promising intersections of the Christian tradition with the research/teaching priorities of the University of Minnesota. This person will work closely with faculty, research staff, and graduate students from a wide range of disciplines. We’re looking for someone who is winsomely Christian, thrives in interaction with a wide variety of people from across disciplines and faith/non-faith backgrounds, and is skilled at giving voice to the breadth of the Christian intellectual tradition in a public university setting. This position will be of particular interest to recent PhDs, graduate students nearing degree completion, and other scholars interested in an “alt-academic” career that keeps them deeply engaged in the academic life of the university.

To see the full description of responsibilities and qualifications, please visit our website. We will begin reviewing applications Jan. 14, and the position will remain open until filled.

Tenure-Track Job Opening in the Messiah College History Department

Boyer Hall

This ad will appear in all the usual places very soon, but I thought I would also post it here at the blog. Starting date is August 2019.   Feel free to share and spread the word.

The Department of History at Messiah College invites applications for a term-tenure track position in Public History with expertise in post-1865 United States History.

Applicants must be committed to working closely with undergraduate students. Teaching responsibilities will include an advanced course in public history, upper-division courses in area of specialty, a United States history survey from 1865, and first-year interdisciplinary general education courses. We are especially interested in candidates who could offer one or more upper-division courses in subfields of public history and American social history.

Ph.D. in Public History/United States History, with specialization in post-1865 American history. We seek faculty committed to undergraduate teaching and research in the context of a Christian liberal arts college.

The history major at Messiah College allows students to study a wide range of historical periods and subjects ranging from public and digital history to courses in American, European, Ancient Mediterranean, World, and South Asian history. We emphasize the cultivation of a breadth of historical learning along with liberal arts skills of research methods, critical thinking, and high-quality writing. History majors take a standard sequence of core courses in historical surveys, methods, and historiography, and then have the option of selecting from a range of upper-division classes in American History, Classical and Medieval European History, Modern European, Public History, and World History. History majors seeking careers in secondary education (grades 7-12) have an option of completing the state credentialing program in conjunction with the Education Department. The department also offers minors in history, digital public humanities, and Classical, Medieval and Renaissance studies, as well as many enrichment opportunities, including interdisciplinary study, undergraduate research honors theses; collaboration with professors on research; internships with museums, historical archives, and governmental agencies; study-abroad semesters and short-term trips around the world; archaeological training; digital projects; and service-learning.

We are a department of six full-time faculty and approximately 45 majors. Students are encouraged to think independently, engage in fruitful debate, and become citizens committed to service, social justice, and reconciliation. The department maintains strong collaborations across campus with the Center for Public Humanities, Teacher Education Program, Office of Diversity Affairs, and the Oakes Museum of Natural History, and off campus with the city of Harrisburg, county and state archives, and regional schools. Our faculty work closely with students to consider how a history major provides a set of transferable skills that will allow them to access diverse opportunities for employment. Our graduates pursue employment and graduate school in a variety of fields, including history, public history, religious studies, journalism, communication, education, sociology, library science, business, law, computer science, data analytics, theology, among many others.

Read the entire ad here.

Job Opening: One-Year Lecturer in American History at Messiah College

Boyer Hall

Anyone interested in spending the 2018-2019 academic year teaching in the Messiah College History Department?

One-year Lecturer in post-1865 American history:  The Department of History at Messiah College invites applications for a one-year lecturer position in post-1865 American history beginning August 2018.  Teaching responsibilities will include introductory and advanced courses in post-1865 American history. Ability to teach the United States history survey to 1865, first-year general education courses (First Year Seminar and First Year interdisciplinary CORE), and at least one upper-division course in area of specialty is required. Evidence of strong commitment to teaching undergraduates in the liberal arts tradition is expected.

Qualifications: Ph.D. (preferred) or A.B.D. with focus on post-1865 American history.

The full job ad, with all the necessary instructions for application, will be posted at the Messiah College website in the next few days, but I wanted to give a heads-up to the faithful readers of The Way of Improvement Leads Home.  When the ad appears at jobs.messiah.edu you will see that we are asking for a cover letter, a vita, 3-letters of recommendation, and a completed application.  The load is 4-4.

As you might imagine, we will be moving quickly on this search.  Once the job ad is released we will be accepting applications immediately.  I will be chairing the search.

Postdoctoral Fellow in “Humility & Conviction in Public Life” at UCONN Humanities Institute

 

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First, let me say how impressed I am that the University of Connecticut Humanities Institute is devoting itself to these kinds of questions.  Bravo!

Second, I hope you might consider applying.  I am told by the powers-that-be at UCONN that it is not too late.

Job Title: Postdoctoral Fellow, Humanities Institute
Job ID: 2017625
Location: Storrs Campus
Full/Part Time: Full-Time
Regular/Temporary: Temporary

Job Posting

The University of Connecticut Humanities Institute, in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the University of Connecticut, Storrs, is accepting applications for a postdoctoral researcher with an anticipated start date of August 23, 2017. The researcher will work under the auspices of Humility & Conviction in Public Life (HCPL), an applied research project generously funded by the John Templeton Foundation aimed at understanding and revitalizing meaningful public discourse over such topics as morality, politics, science and religion. The initial appointment is for one year, with the possibility of renewal for a second year. For more information on the project, please see its website.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS

Completed requirements for a Ph.D. (or foreign equivalent) in a humanities field (broadly construed) by start date of employment; evidence of a strong research/publication trajectory; and active research and public engagement interests integrating well with the stated aims and interests of the HCPL project.

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS

Evidence of excellence in research; a research profile that indicates strong interest in applied research relevant to public discourse, interest in or knowledge of research on intellectual or epistemic humility, public deliberation and dialogue; and the ability to contribute through research, teaching, and/or public engagement to the diversity and excellence of project and Institute missions.

APPOINTMENT TERMS

This is an 11 month, annually renewable position. The successful candidate’s primary academic appointment will be in the Humanities Institute on the Storrs campus.

TO APPLY

Select “Apply Now” to be redirected to Academic Jobs Online to complete your application. Please submit the following materials: 1) cover letter with description of how your research and qualifications mesh with the HCPL project, 2) CV, and 3) a sample of scholarly writing. Additionally, please follow the instructions in Academic Jobs Online to direct three reference writers to submit letters of reference on your behalf. 

Evaluation of applications will begin immediately, and continue until the position is filled. Preference will be given to applications received by August 1, 2017. Employment of the successful candidate is contingent upon the successful completion of a pre- employment background check. (Search # 2017625). 

Inquiries may be sent to Jo-Ann Waide at: uchi@uconn.edu .

All employees are subject to adherence to the State Code of Ethics which may be found at http://www.ct.gov/ethics/site/default.asp.

The University of Connecticut is committed to building and supporting a multicultural and diverse community of students, faculty and staff. The diversity of students, faculty and staff continues to increase, as does the number of honors students, valedictorians and salutatorians who consistently make UConn their top choice. More than 100 research centers and institutes serve the University’s teaching, research, diversity, and outreach missions, leading to UConn’s ranking as one of the nation’s top research universities. UConn’s faculty and staff are the critical link to fostering and expanding our vibrant, multicultural and diverse University community. As an Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity employer, UConn encourages applications from women, veterans, people with disabilities and members of traditionally underrepresented populations.

 

*Common-place* is Looking for a New Editor

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Common-place, the online quarterly magazine of early American history and culture hosted at the American Antiquarian Society, is seeking a new editor or editors to guide this unique online resource of accessible, lively scholarship. This position is not a paid employee in the traditional sense. We are looking to partner with a university or college where the editor is employed. That institution supports the partnership by providing time, generally in the form of course relief for the editor (or editors) so that they can devote time to Common-place. We are also looking for this institution to supply an editorial assistant, either in the form of a paid employee or a graduate student.

The editor(s) of Common-place should have a record of writing and scholarly activity in a field consistent with the purview of Common-place (pre-1900 American history, literature, and culture as well as a Ph.D. or equivalent). The editor should also possess strong organizational and editorial skills and be comfortable working collaboratively with an excellent group of column editors. Perhaps most importantly, the editor must possess an interest in presenting American history to a broad public, and an instinct for how to do so in a compelling way.

In addition, the editor’s home institution would need to be understanding of the commitment involved in taking on the editorship, and be willing to support the editor in performing this work. We seek an institutional partner that is able to support the editor through release time from teaching; graduate research assistance; and other forms of support. Of particular interest is an institution with an interest in and capacity for work in public history and/or the digital humanities. A partnership with Common-place would provide ideal opportunities to give students hands-on experience in working with an established online venue for high-level humanities scholarship.

Interested candidates should contact James David Moran, Vice President for Programs and Outreach, American Antiquarian Society by phone at 508 471-2131 or by e-mail at jmoran@mwa.org.

Summer Internship Opportunity at *Black Perspectives*

Black

Here it is:

Black Perspectives, the blog of the African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS), is currently accepting applications for our inaugural summer editorial internship program. The internship, which begins on June 1st and ends on August 31st, is open to graduate students and advanced undergraduate students.

About Black Perspectives

Black Perspectives is the leading online platform for public scholarship on global black thought, history, and culture. As engaged scholars, we are deeply committed to producing and disseminating cutting-edge research that is accessible to the public and is oriented towards advancing the lives of people of African descent and humanity. Formerly referred to as the African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS) Blog, Black Perspectives serves as the medium to advance these critical goals. Although many of the writers are historians, we provide a crucial online space for scholars working in various academic fields.

We understand African American and African diasporic thought in its broadest terms and encourage the use of interdisciplinary research approaches. We also value diversity and inclusion and welcome all scholars–regardless of race, gender, class, sexual orientation, or any other social category—to contribute as long as the research is thorough and accurate in its portrayal of black thought, history, and culture.

About the Internship

Interns will work closely with the blog editors on a part-time, unpaid basis for three months and receive practical experience in academic blogging. Each intern will contribute to the publication of the blog in a variety of aspects including research, copy-editing, fact checking, and formatting. Interns will receive a complimentary one-year membership in AAIHS and waived registration fee for the 2018 AAIHS conference.

The 3-month internship offers young scholars an opportunity to sharpen their writing skills and receive personalized feedback on their writing. It also provides interns with access to a diverse network of early career bloggers (and professors), and the opportunity to publish their pieces on a popular academic blog. The internship is online, which means that interns only need access to a computer and internet.

Qualifications

  • Currently enrolled in an accredited academic institution; graduate students (PhD and MA students) and advanced undergraduate students.
  • Preference will be given to candidates who major/specialize in History, African American Studies, English, and Journalism. However, we will consider applications from candidates in a variety of fields including Political Science, Sociology, Women’s and Gender Studies, International Relations and America Studies.
  • Must be motivated, detailed-oriented, and possess strong writing skills.
  • Must have a knowledge base and keen interest in black thought, history and culture.
  • Must have an interest in blog writing and social media.
  • Must be interested in working with a diverse group of scholars who are passionate about black thought, history, and culture.
  • Must be willing to devote approximately 10 hours per week to assisting with the blog; and be willing to attend mandatory online training sessions during the week of May 28th and attend one-hour SKYPE/Phone meetings (generally once per month).

Those interested in the program are invited to submit the following materials to Profs. Keisha N. Blain and Ibram X. Kendi via email at aaihs10@gmail.com no later than May 25, 2017.

Job Opening at Huntingdon College

Huntingdon

The Way of Improvement Leads Home reader Mandy McMichael passed this along.

The Department of History and Political Science at Huntingdon College (Montgomery, Alabama) invites applications for a full-time tenure-track faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor to begin August 2016. The ideal candidate will specialize in European History and demonstrate a record of excellence in teaching and student engagement. The successful candidate will be proficient in engaging pedagogy, and special attention will be given to candidates with expertise in the Reacting to the Past curriculum. Huntingdon College is seeking to expand the diversity of its faculty and strongly encourages applications from minority candidates.


The Department of History and Political Science at Huntingdon College (Montgomery, Alabama) invites applications for a full-time tenure-track faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor to begin August 2016. The ideal candidate will specialize in European History and demonstrate a record of excellence in teaching and student engagement. The successful candidate will be proficient in engaging pedagogy, and special attention will be given to candidates with expertise in the Reacting to the Past curriculum. Interested candidates should submit a letter of interest, one-page statement of teaching philosophy, CV, transcripts, and three letters of recommendation to Dr. Chad Eggleston, Provost and Dean of the College, at officeoftheprovost@hawks.huntingdon.edu by March 7, 2016. Huntingdon College is seeking to expand the diversity of its faculty and strongly encourages applications from minority candidates.

Desired qualifications: Ph.D. in History (specializing in European History). Minimum of two years teaching experience, record of student engagement, evidence of ongoing research and scholarly activity, excellent interpersonal skills, desire to contribute to the growth and evolution of a successful program.

Huntingdon College, grounded in the Judeo-Christian tradition of the United Methodist Church, is committed to nurturing growth in faith, wisdom, and service and to graduating individuals prepared to succeed in a rapidly changing world. Founded in 1854, Huntingdon is a coeducational liberal arts college.

Huntingdon College is committed to a policy against legally impermissible, arbitrary, or unreasonable discriminatory practices. Therefore, the College, in accordance with applicable federal and state law and stated College policy, prohibits discrimination in its employment practices and in the delivery of its educational programs on the basis of actual or perceived race, color, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, disability, religion, age, and/or national origin. Inquiries and or complaints may be addressed to the Huntingdon College Title IX Coordinator / 1500 East Fairview Ave. / Montgomery, AL 36106, phoned to 334-833-4420 or e-mailed to TitleIXCoordinator@hawks.huntingdon.edu. Inquiries or complaints regarding disability services may be addressed to Huntingdon College / ADA Section 504 Coordinator / Director of Disability Services / 1500 East Fairview Ave. / Montgomery, AL 36106, phoned to 334-833-4465 or e-mailed to DisabilityServices@ hawks.huntingdon.edu. For additional information, contact the Atlanta office of the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, 61 Forsyth St. S.W., Suite 19T10, Atlanta, GA 30303-8927 at 404-874-9406; OCR.Atlanta@ed.gov.

Loren Collins on How To Enter the Job Market with a B.A. in History

Great stuff at the AHA blog from Loren Collins, a career counselor at Humboldt State University with a B.A. in history.  

I have been preaching this stuff for several years through my series “So What CAN You Do With a History Major” and my Why Study History?, but Collins does it a lot better.

Here is a taste:

History degrees are versatile, viable, and valuable, but so often they are not understood or marketed on these terms. You may have chosen history because you had visions of devouring stacks of ancient primary source documents in a glorious repository in an ancient European metropolis. Or maybe you dreamt of standing in front of a high school class much like your own high school history class, waking the heart of a high school student a lot like you once were. Or, like many of us, you simply chose the major because you liked it and you knew you’d have to figure out a job down the road. Whatever your motivation, the first thing you need to learn is how to market your degree

History is dynamic, and you should be a bright, capable, and thorough thinker, writer, communicator, and researcher because of your time as an undergraduate. The problem is that no one will know it until you tell them! People make assumptions about various majors all the time, and in the news they often recite and rehash false stories about college education that go unchallenged. On your resume, in your cover letter, and during interviews and networking scenarios you need to quantify your experience in terms employers can understand and change the common perceptions out there. Your ability to do this can make all the difference. According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers, employers cite the following as the top skills employers look for in college graduates:

Here is the takeaway:

1.  Learn how to market your degree
2.  Explore the job field.  (“Where do you want to work?)
3.  Start targeting employers before they put out their job ads

One Year, Full-Time Position in Western Civilization and World History at Messiah College

Last week I posted a job ad for an adjunct instructor in Western Civilization at Messiah College, the college where I teach and serve as the Chair of the History Department.  Since that time we have received approval to turn this position into a one-year, full-time position with salary and benefits.

We are looking for someone who can teach the following course load:

Fall 2015:  3 sections of Western Civ I or Western Civ II and a First Year Seminar  (writing enriched) on a topic of their choice.

J-Term 2016 (3 week course): Western Civ I or Western Civ II

Spring 2016: 2 sections of World Civilization I or World Civilization II and a section of Western Civ.

As many of you know, Messiah College is a Christian College.  Faculty should be willing, in good conscience, to sign the Apostles Creed and support the mission of the college.

Here is a taste of the official job ad.  It should be posted at the Messiah College Human Resources page and on H-Net and the Chronicle of Higher Education in the next few days.

Position Title:                   One-year Lecturer in Western and World Civilizations
 
Position:                      The Department of History at Messiah College invites applications for a one year lecturer position in Western and World Civilizations beginning August 2015.
 
Responsibilities:          Teaching responsibilities will include introductory, general education survey courses (100-level) in Western Civilization (I & II) and World Civilization (I or II). Willingness to teach a First Year Seminar in area of expertise. Experience teaching Western Civilization and World Civilization required. Evidence of strong commitment to teaching undergraduates in the liberal arts tradition is expected. Course load is 4 courses in Fall 2015, 1 course during J-term, and 3 courses in Spring 2016.
 
Qualifications:           Ph.D. Or A.B.D. in History with focus on European history or non-Western World preferred. M.A. with substantial teaching experience may be considered.
Feel free to contact me with any questions about the position.

Looking For an Adjunct History Instructor for Fall 2015

The Messiah College History Department, which I chair, is looking for someone to teach two sections of Western Civilization (preferably Western Civ I: Before 1500) in the Fall 2015 semester.  The ideal candidate will have a Ph.D in history, but an ABD or M.A. with some teaching experience in Western Civilization or European History could work.  I also prefer someone who can teach during the regular academic day (as opposed to evening) on a MWF or T-TH schedule.  Having said that, I will consider one of these courses being an evening class if the right candidate emerges.

There may also be opportunities for this person to teach Western Civ in our J-Term session and in the Spring 2016.

As many of you know, Messiah College is a Christian College.  Faculty should be willing, in good conscience, to sign the Apostles Creed and support the mission of the college.
If you are interested, or have any questions, please contact me at jfea(at)messiah(dot)edu and attach a current vita.   I am looking to fill these slots as soon as possible.  
Also, please feel free to share this with friends or other potential applicants.
Thanks,

Chair in Quaker Studies at Haverford College

This looks like a nice gig for a scholar of Quakerism.  –JF


Douglas and Dorothy Steere Professorship in Quaker Studies (open rank)
Haverford College, founded in 1833 by Quakers, invites applications for the newly endowed Douglas and Dorothy Steere Professorship in Quaker Studies.  This tenure-line faculty position is open to teacher-scholars at all levels (Assistant, Associate, or Full Professor) whose scholarly work engages the history, culture, religion, literature, peace building or social activism of the Religious Society of Friends.  The successful candidate will maintain an active research and teaching program that includes opportunities for faculty-student collaboration, preferably utilizing Haverford’s extensive Quaker Collection of manuscripts, organizational records, artifacts, and artwork gathered from the 17thcentury to the present.  Haverford faculty members teach five courses per year, of which the Steere professor will teach at least two courses that substantially address some feature of Quaker Studies within the candidate’s disciplinary or interdisciplinary fields of study.  Additional courses should contribute to one of Haverford’s existing academic departments and/or programs (http://www.haverford.edu/academics/departments_and_programs/).   
Candidates for the position should have a Ph.D. and a strong record of research and teaching.  The position also requires a firm commitment to interdisciplinary scholarship and the emerging field of Quaker Studies.  Salary is commensurate with experience and qualifications and research and travel money accompany this endowed professorship.
Please submit a cover letter addressing your vision for this new position, a curriculum vitae, a sample syllabus for a course in Quaker Studies, a research statement, a writing sample (published work or work in progress), and arrange to have three letters of recommendation submitted to (apply.interfolio.com/27495).  Questions about the application process should be directed to Georgia Davidis Malone, Faculty Dossier Coordinator, Haverford College (gdavidisma@haverford.edu).  To receive full consideration, all application materials should be received in electronic form by December 10, 2014.

More Good Stuff on Careers and the History Major

Chris Gehrz, the chair of the History Department at Bethel University in St. Paul and the author of The Pietist Schoolman blog, is doing a lot of good thinking on career paths and destinations for history majors.

His recent post, “Majoring in History, Thriving in Business” tells the story of several Bethel History Department alums who are using their history major in the business world.  Here is a taste:

Enter Brandon Raatikka (’03) and Tim Goddard (’04). A decade out from their History education at Bethel, they’re thriving in the business world:
Tim studied history, biology, and writing at Bethel, worked on a political campaign, wrote a novel, taught science in Brazil, and built from an early interest in web design and blogging into employment with software startups. He’s now vice president of marketing for a group that facilitates mergers between software companies.• Brandon went to law school at the University of Minnesota, wrote for the law review, and parlayed his J.D. into a position as a research analyst for a small company providing due diligence for investments like commercial real estate. He’s now the vice president in charge of risk assessment for that company.
Despite taking such different routes, Tim and Brandon came to some of the same conclusions when asked how a History degree prepared them for careers in business. Both emphasized the skills they’d learned from their undergraduate studies, and that their abilities to think critically, research, and write well very much set them apart in the business world:
(Brandon) …the biggest things I took away from my education at Bethel were how to think more critically about situations where the right “answer” isn’t always apparent, and how to write well (as you get a lot of practice writing in history classes). Apart from certain financial and accounting aspects of it, business is largely a “soft” science. Training in history and other humanities gets one comfortable dealing with ambiguities. It helps you assess the significance of facts and order their importance relative to other facts. Being able to focus on the big picture, while still knowing how the small details relate to that big picture, is a huge advantage in business, and something that studies in history can train one to do. Also, history courses are an important element of a well-rounded, liberal arts education — and especially in the context of a small business, where one inevitably wears many hats, a “generalist” mindset is valuable.

(Tim) …the ability to write well is incredibly valuable across all disciplines, I’ve found. It was certainly true in my history courses, as well as the rest of my Bethel experience and beyond…. Writing skillfully, accurately, and with a touch of flair is an even more significant advantage in the job field now than I think it was a decade ago…. History majors are perhaps a bit more prevalent in the corporate world than you would think. The habits of research, writing and critical thinking that a history degree can build are vital in any field. The ability to critically evaluate sources is particularly valuable…

Great stuff, Chris.  Thanks for sharing these stories from your former students!  Chris gives a nice plug to the work we are doing here at the blog and in Why Study History?: Reflecting on the Importance of the Past.  For more on what you can do with a history major, check out our ongoing series on the subject.

Coca-Cola Executive: Liberal Arts Is Best Preparation for Business Careers

Clyde Tuggle of Coca Cola

Clyde Tuggle is the chief public affairs officer at Coca-Cola.  He majored in German and Economics at Hamilton College and then went on to get an M.Div from Yale Divinity School. Tuggle recently told a group of students at Washington and Lee College that the fields he chose to study provided him with “the perfect education for the business world.”  Here is a taste of an article about his talk from the Washington and Lee website:

“I never had finance or accounting, yet I help run a huge business,” the visiting Woodrow Wilson Fellow said. “I learned communications, research and critical thinking” in liberal arts and religious studies at Hamilton College and Yale, respectively. At Coke, “I blew right by the [business majors].”
Tuggle’s words offer encouragement to a generation of liberal arts college students who might not know in which industry they want to work, after being advised since high school to adopt a laser focus on a career interest.

Job Opening in World History at Messiah College

Boyer Hall: Home of the Messiah History Department

The Messiah College Department of History is looking for a one-year lecturer in World History for the 2014-2015 academic year.  Teaching responsibilities will include introductory and advanced courses in World History. Ability to teach non-Western history for both general education and major courses is required. Evidence of strong commitment to teaching undergraduates in the liberal arts tradition is expected.


Read the full job ad here.  Feel free to shoot me an e-mail with questions about the position.

AHA Career Fair

I love this idea.  The American Historical Association is planning a career fair for students and job candidates in history.  Yesterday they put out a call for professionals who use their training in history in their jobs.  Here is the announcement:

Were you trained in history and use that training in your job?  Do you work in business, education, nonprofits, government, archives, libraries, publishing, or another area?  If you’ll be in Washington, DC, om the afternoon of January 4, please come to the Marriott Wardman Park and share your experiences with students and job candidates who are attending the AHA annual meeting.

We’re looking for people willing to volunteer anytime between 1-5pm on January 4.  You can find a sign-up form on the AHA website.  Mentors will be stationed at tables where students and job candidates can browse.  Feel free to bring literature about your field or employer, but there won’t be room for extensive displays.  Help expand the horizons for history majors, and let them know about all the myriad options for them to use their skills and knowledge!

The AHA jobs website notes that “Mentors have already signed up from independent schools, community colleges, historical societies, government and publishing.”


Early American History Job Opening at Mount Saint Mary’s University

The good folks at “The Mount” have a tenure-track opening in early American history.  This would be a wonderful place to workIf you are interested in teaching in a church-related (Catholic) liberal arts college with great colleagues, I would encourage you to apply.  Personally, it would be great to have another early Americanist on the Route 15 corridor!

The Department of History at Mount St. Mary’s University seeks an outstanding teacher-scholar for the position of Assistant Professor (tenure-track) beginning August 2014. The ideal candidate will demonstrate a strong commitment to teaching and research on  Early American History.  The department is particularly interested in candidates with special training in the history of the Atlantic World or the slave trade and slavery.  The department seeks a colleague who will be able to contribute both to advanced undergraduate research in the History major and to the Veritas Program, the university’s common liberal arts curriculum that includes a two-semester sequence of interdisciplinary courses on the American Experience.  Successful candidates will share our commitment to the dignity and solidarity of all persons and the value of intercultural understanding.  Ph.D. is expected; ABD candidates will also be considered.

Mount St. Mary’s University, the second oldest Catholic university in America, seeks faculty members eager to engage and support our Catholic identity.  Application materials should discuss how you might contribute to the University’s Catholic liberal arts mission, how your work engages with the Catholic intellectual tradition, or how your own faith tradition informs your vocation as teacher and scholar. 

Application review will begin on October 15; applications received by this time will receive full consideration, but the search will remain open until the position is filled.

The Mount is a comprehensive, nationally recognized Catholic university, where Faith, Discovery, Leadership, and Community describe our collective calling and promise.  The University enrolls 2,300 students and has a 14:1 student to faculty ratio.  We seek to build an inclusive faculty that can engage the interests of an increasingly diverse student population; we welcome applications from minority candidates.  Additional information about Mount St. Mary’s University is available at www.msmary.edu.

Job Opening in Me Studies

The department of English invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professor in ME Studies, starting Fall 2014. Applicants should demonstrate a sustained scholarly engagement with ME.

Demonstrated expertise in one or more of the following areas is preferred: research I care about, topics I’ve been focusing on for years, theories I am familiar with, practices I approve of, and debates already settled by ME.

Successful applicants will be less successful than I am but not so unsuccessful that it reflects poorly on ME. The lucky chosen one will have the opportunity to work with ME. Candidates must have a Ph.D. from an institution I approve of and have recommendation letters from people I know and respect but am not threatened by. Please send just the names of people you know I know by October 15th.
My university is an Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate against any individual on the basis of age, color, disability, gender, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, veteran status or genetic information. However, applicants who cite ME are particularly encouraged to apply.

No, this is not a real job.