Trump announces members of his “President’s Advisory 1776 Commission.” There are no American historians.

As COVID-19 cases reach record heights and our country faces unprecedented cyber-attacks, Donald Trump is making appointment to his 1776 Commission. Trump established the commission by executive order on November 2, 2020 and Joe Biden is likely to eliminate it after he is inaugurated on January 20, 2020.

The White House announced: “Today, President Donald J. Trump announced his intent to appoint the following individuals to be Members of the President’s Advisory 1776 Commission for terms of two years”:

Here are Trump’s appointments. It is worth noting that there are no professional American historians on the committee.

Larry Arnn: He is the current president of conservative Hillsdale College. Arnn spoke at the September 2020 National Archive event in which Trump announced the 1776 Commission. This was an event that included noted conservative historians Wilfred McClay and Allen Guelzo. It was at this event that Arnn announced McClay was moving from the University of Oklahoma to Hillsdale.

Dr. Carol M. Swain: She is a retired Princeton and Vanderbilt political scientist. She is an open critic of the Black Lives Matter movement and once compared it to the Ku Klux Klan.

Brooke L. Rollins: She currently services as the acting director of United States Domestic Policy Council in the Trump administration and is a strong advocate of criminal justice reform.

Vincent M. Haley: A Trump policy adviser who worked as “Vice President” for “Special Projects” at Newt Gingrich Productions.

Victor Davis Hanson: Former Classics professor at California State University, Fresno. He is a fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution, a conservative writer, and Trump advocate.

Phil Bryant: Former Republican governor of Mississippi.

Mike Gonzalez: Senior fellow at The Heritage Foundation and critic of Critical Race Theory and the 1619 Project.

John Gibbs: Trump nominee for U.S. Office of Personnel Management. He is a conservative pundit who has spread the conspiracy theory that Hillary Clinton was part of a satanic cult.

Scott McNealy: A Nevada businessman and Trump supporter who describes himself as a “raging capitalist” and libertarian.

Gay Hart Gaines: Republican activist, former president of the Palm Beach Republican Club, and a member of the Mount Vernon Ladies Association.

Ned Ryun: The son of runner Jim Ryun, conservative activist, and self-proclaimed historian

Charles Kirk: Court evangelical, co-founder of the Liberty University Falkirk Center, and a pro-Trump social media hound. Does not have a college degree.

Peter N. Kirsanow: Ohio lawyer, conservative writer, and a member of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.

Charles R. Kesler: Government professor at Claremont McKenna College and editor of Claremont Review of Books.

Dr. Thomas K. Lindsay: Fellow at the conservative Texas Public Policy Foundation.

Jerry C. Davis: President of evangelical College of the Ozarks in Missouri, a college that requires all students to take courses in “patriotic education and fitness.”

Michael Farris: Virginia lawyer who founded the Home School Legal Defense Fund and Patrick Henry College in Purceville, VA.

Bob McEwen: Former member of the House of Representatives from Ohio and friend of Liberty University.

Historian Wilfred McClay will join the faculty of Hillsdale College

One of nation’s leading conservative thinkers will join one of America’s most conservative schools. (See our previous McClay posts here).

Here is the Hillsdale Collegian:

Hillsdale College’s history department will gain a prestigious new faculty member next fall: Wilfred M. McClay.

Currently the G.T. and Libby Blankenship Chair in the History of Liberty at the University of Oklahoma, McClay will make the move to Hillsdale following the end of the spring 2021 semester.

“My experience with Hillsdale is of an extraordinary community, built upon a shared love of the highest and noblest things,” McClay said in an email. “That too is vanishingly rare, and I count myself blessed to have the opportunity to share the life of that community, and I hope to contribute something good and lasting to it.”

According to McClay, the discussion of joining Hillsdale’s faculty began over the summer of 2019 when he came to campus for a week to film lectures for his online course on American History. After some persuasion and paperwork, McClay is now set to begin teaching the American Heritage courses this fall, but may expand beyond that in following semesters.

Read the rest here.