Sunday in Trumpland

 

Trump Barry

Things seem to be business as usual in Trumpland.

Last night we learned that Donald Trump’s sister, retired federal judge Maryanne Trump Barry, had some choice things to say about her brother. Let’s be clear. She didn’t say anything that we didn’t already know about this president.

Readers of this blog might be interested in Maryanne Barry’s comments about the president’s political base: “All he wants to do is appeal to his base. He has no principles. None. None. And his base, I mean my God, if you were a religious person, you want to help people. Not do this.”

The White House released a statement regarding the comments made by the president’s sister. It read: “Every day it’s something else, who cares. I miss my brother, and I’ll continue to work hard for the American people. Not everyone agrees, but the results are obvious. Our country will soon be stronger than ever before.”

It is the eve of the Republican National Convention and the convention website has very little information about what is going to happen. We do, however, finally have a list of speakers. The Trump family will be filling a significant number of speaking slots.

U.S. Senators speaking include Tim Scott, Rand Paul, Marsha Blackburn, Joni Ernst, Mitch McConnell, and Tom Cotton. Some GOP Senators with national reputations will not be speaking. This list includes Lamar Alexander, Susan Collins, John Cornyn, Ted Cruz, Lindsay Graham, Chuck Grassley, Josh Hawley, Jim Inhofe, James Lankford, Mike Lee, John Kennedy, Kelly Loeffler, Martha McSally, Lisa Murkowski, Mitt Romney, Marco Rubio, Ben Sasse, and Rick Scott.

Speakers from the House of Representatives include Steve Scalise, Matt Gaetz, Jim Jordan, Dan Crenshaw, Elise Stefanik, Lee Zeldin, Kevin McCarthy, and Jeff Van Drew.

Others noteworthy speakers include former U.N. ambassador Nikki Haley, Donald Trump Jr.’s girlfriend (and former Fox News pundit) Kimberly Guilfoyle, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds, South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem, Trump staffer Kellyanne Conway, Eric Trump’s wife Lana Trump, and Rudy Giuliani.

There are also several speakers who represent our nation’s ongoing culture wars. They include court evangelical Franklin Graham, Covington Catholic High School student Nicholas Sandman, court evangelical Charlie Kirk, and the St. Louis’s gun wielding couple Mark and Patricia McCloskey.

Trump is still tweeting about God.

He is still obsessed with the pledge of allegiance:

For a full treatment of what happened read this post from yesterday.

Trump had another tweet today about God:

This tweet, of course, is a blatant attempt to win the votes of evangelicals in November. But it also tells us what Trump really thinks about evangelicals. He believes that we will gravitate to any political candidate who mentions the name of God. We will blindly follow the sound of the “We want God” mantra–like zombies–into the voting booth. Sadly, this may actually be the case for many of my fellow evangelicals.

The court evangelicals seem to welcome Trump’s appeal to his base. This morning a megachurch pastor in California turned his pulpit over to Charlie Kirk of Liberty University’s Falkirk Center:

I wonder what Kirk will say. Perhaps some of his most recent tweets (last 24 hours) will make it into his Lord’s Day sermon:

Liberty University Falkirk Center fellow Jenna Ellis loves Trump’s tweet about God:

Self-pointed prophet Lance Wallnau is still talking about Kamala Harris as a “Jezebel” (and hawking a book).

 

Court evangelical journalist David Brody believes Trump is the only biblical candidate:

I am curious about what Brody means by “traditional biblical policy positions.” Most evangelicals didn’t really see abortion as a political issue until the mid-1970s.

Robert Jeffress was on Fox News this morning.

First, he seems to believe that one can “remove God” from public life. It this theological possible? I think most evangelicals, myself included, believe God is bigger that this.

Second, Jeffress also ignores the fact that the Pledge of Allegiance was recited every night at the DNC convention with the phrase “under God” included. But why would the pastor bring this up when he can twist the truth for political advantage?

Third, Jeffress implies that people of faith in the Democratic Party are not true Christians.

Fourth, Jeffress continues to promote this idea that abortion is the only political issue evangelicals should be concerned about. Perhaps he should read conservative evangelical David French’s column today in which he challenges this idea.

Watch:

Stay tuned. Classes start this week at Messiah University, but I still hope there is time to watch the GOP convention and write a few words.

Does any Christian want their son to turn out like Don Jr.? (And other thoughts on a recent Charlie Kirk and Jack Hibbs conversation).

Several Trump evangelicals have sent me this video this week. So let me respond to Charlie Kirk and megachurch pastor Jack Hibbs. First, watch the video:

Some thoughts:

At the 0:18 mark, Kirk says that United States presidency is electing a “world view.” I am not comfortable with this kind of “world view” language, but for the sake of argument, I’ll accept it here. So what kind of “world view” should the President of the United States possess? Well, on one level, the answer is pretty obvious. He should uphold the Constitution and not threaten our democratic institutions. Of course Trump has done this at every turn. He disparages the press, refused to cooperate with the impeachment proceedings in the House of Representatives, tried to work with Ukraine to undermine the 2020 election, openly discredited military and intelligence advisers, used his bully pulpit to attack Supreme Court justices, claimed that there was voter fraud when no such fraud existed, promoted QAnon and other “deep state “conspiracy theories, refuses to show his tax returns to the American people, contradicts his own science and public health officials, and now wants to undermine the Post Office to make it more difficult for people to vote in November.

Kirk also seems to equate “world view” with “civil society.” We can define “civil society” in many different ways. At the most basic level, the phrase is used to describe institutions–the family, churches, non-profit organizations, clubs and associations–that are not sponsored by the state. Such institutions promote community, the common good, and sense of collective activity. The idea, of course, is that when such institutions flourish, our democracy will be more “civil” in the way we treat one another.

Kirk misunderstands the meaning of “civil society” on two levels. First, he implies that “civil society” in a democracy is somehow connected to a presidential election. Granted, a president who ignores checks and balances and behaves like a tyrant might have the power to crush the institutions of a civil society, but as long as the executive is held in check by the other two branches of government, the press, and the American people, civil society will continue to thrive. (And, as Robert Putnam famously put it in Bowling Alone, we also must help civil society to thrive by exercising our social duties).

Second, Kirk seems to suggest that because Trump encourages civility, he is worthy of American votes in November.  Anyone who reads Trump’s Twitter feed or watches his press conferences and speeches knows that Trump has no interest whatsoever in working toward the common good. He demonizes his enemies, calls them names, stokes division, and lies virtually every time he speaks in public. So forgive me if I disagree with Charlie Kirk’s claim that Trump is a “representation” of “civil society.” Moreover, there is very little that is “civil” about this entire Kirk-Hibbs conversation. This event, held in an evangelical church, is defined by anger, bitterness, and rage.

At the 0:30 mark, Kirk claims that Trump is a “placeholder” for “what is moral and what is good.” Can any thinking Christian really affirm this?

At the 0:58 mark, Kirk says that he wishes he could one day “be as good” as Donald Trump. This kind of moral thinking, if we can even call it that, is delusional when compared to how the Bible defines what is “good.”

At the 1:15 mark, Jack Hibbs says that Trump might have a “checkered past,” but he is “not the guy that he used to be.” Really? Have I spent the last four years watching the same president as Hibbs? It seems like most of Trump’s past character (OK, granted, he is not sleeping with porn stars in the oval office) has been on display virtually every day of his presidency. But Hibbs goes on, “We’re America, we’re supposed to be so forgiving and so kind and so prone to give people a second chance.” What an odd thing for a pastor to say. Instead of talking about forgiveness, kindness, and redemption as biblical values, Hibbs connects them to “America.” But let’s also remember that in Hibbs’s way of seeing the world, there is little difference between the Kingdom of God and the Kingdom of America.

At the 1:30 mark, Hibbs implies that Trump is a moral and righteous man because he has a good relationship with his kids and the kids speak highly of their Dad. (Michael Corleone also spoke highly of his father and I am sure Vito checked-in with him every day :-))

Is Hibbs familiar with the Twitter accounts and public pronouncements of Ivanka, Jared, Don Jr., and Eric? (Sadly, I think he probably is). All four of these “kids,” especially Don Jr. and Eric, use their platforms to spew hate and enable their father’s immorality. Does any Christian want their son to turn out like Don Jr.?

At the 3:00 mark, Kirk plays the abortion card. Notice what is happening here. Kirk never puts forth any positive plan to reduce abortions in America apart from re-electing Trump. Even if the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade, it will not end abortion in the United States. The decisions will be turned back to the states.  Kirk knows this, but he also knows that if he brings up abortion he can fire-up the crowd.

Sadly, Kirk’s efforts to throw red meat to Trump’s base is not going to get us anywhere in curbing abortions in America. But it might keep Republicans in power and continue to provide him with a political platform. As I have said before, Black women and women in poverty have a disproportionate number of abortions in America today. But the policies of Donald Trump and his wonder-boy Charlie Kirk will do nothing to address this problem. In fact, Trump and Kirk do not even believe that systemic racism exists. Kirk’s remarks about avoiding the judgment of God reflect the arrogance and “cockiness” that he derides among those on the left.

Well, you asked me for my “take” on this video. I hope this helps.

Saturday night court evangelical roundup

donald-trump-and-pastor-paula-white

What have Trump’s evangelicals been saying since our last update?

Samuel Rodriguez is upset about the prohibition on singing in California churches.

Jim Garlow agrees with Rodriguez:

Here is how Dietrich Bonhoeffer would probably respond to Rodriguez and Garlow.

Meanwhile, court evangelical journalist David Brody loved Trump’s Mount Rushmore speech:

Here is Brody again:

I don’t think you need to be a “far left latte sipper” to be troubled by what happened last night at Mount Rushmore. It was a “big celebration” during a pandemic with no masks or social distancing on a weekend in which the CDC warned people about gathering in large crowds. We already know that Don Trump Jr.’s wife tested positive for COVID-19. And don’t even get me started on Trump’s use of the American past to divide the country on Independence Day. I wonder what Frederick Douglass would have thought about Trump’s speech. By the way, I am not “far left” and have probably had ten latte’s in my life. I prefer the $1.00 large McDonald’s coffee on my way to campus. 🙂

Charlie Kirk, an evangelical Christian, bids his followers to come and die:

Does anyone want to help Kirk, the co-director of Liberty University’s Falkirk Center, reconcile the previous tweet (above) with the one below this paragraph? I am not sure he understands the meaning of “liberty requires responsibility.” As Christian moral philosopher Josef Pieper wrote, “It is the concern of the just man…to give others due rather than to obtain what is due him.” But what does Pieper, one of the great Christian intellectuals of the 20th century, know? He is not, after all, 26-year-old Trump wonder boy Charlie Kirk:

And then there is this:

Lance Wallnau is attacking another so-called “prophet” and, in the process, offers his own prophesy. He says the coronavirus, racial unrest, Christians “taking a knee,” and the tearing down of monuments are all judgments of God on America. If you have time, read the thousands of comments on the right of the video and then come back and let’s talk about my “fear” thesis.

Jenna Ellis, a spokesperson for Liberty University’s Falkirk Center, is getting into the “America was founded as a Christian nation” business.

She also liked Trump’s Mount Rushmore speech:

I would like to hear how John Hagee uses the Bible to defend free speech, the right to assemble, the right to petition, the freedom of the press, the right to bear arms, etc.:

Like patriotic ministers have been doing since the time of the American Revolution, Hagee takes New Testament passages about liberty and freedom and applies them to political freedom:

Tony Perkins is engaging in the same type of scriptural manipulation:

Gary Bauer throws thousands and thousands of hard-working American history teachers under the bus by telling them that they don’t love their country:

Robert Jeffress is back on Fox News defending his Lord’s Day morning political rally with a non-social-distanced choir. His defense if whataboutism:

The day before, Jeffress made his weekly visit with Lou Dobbs. Pretty much the same stuff:

Focus on the Family is running an interview with Eric Metaxas about his book If You Can Keep It. I point you to my review of this seriously flawed book. If you want to take a deeper dive into this, here is a link to my longer review. I assume that this was taped a while ago (the book appeared in 2016).  As I listen to Metaxas’s radio show today, and compare it with this interview, it is striking how far Trump and the aftermath of the George Floyd killing  has pushed him even further into a Christian Right brand of Trumpism.

Franklin Graham is quoting the Declaration of Independence. Here is a question: Was Thomas Jefferson right? I think the Christian tradition certainly values life. It certain values spiritual liberty in Christ. But what about political liberty? What about the pursuit of happiness? Perhaps this is something to discuss with your friends and family over the holiday weekend.

Until next time.

Friday night court evangelical roundup

Court Evangelicals at Table

What have Trump’s evangelicals been saying since our last update?

Jentezen is worried about the radical left controlling churches:

Jack Graham is asking people to wear their military uniforms to church on Sunday. Why do white evangelicals always appeal to the Armed Forces, and only the Armed Forces, on July 4th?

I am really confused by both Paula White’s retweet and Samuel Rodriguez’s original tweet:

I am also confused by this tweet. What has history told us, Paula?

James Robison makes it sound like “profanity, pornography, and exploitation” are new things in America:

Robert Jeffress tweets the Great Commission:

I’ve always wondered why so many Christian Right preachers stop after Matthew 28:19. Don’t they realize that the Great Commission continues into verse 20: “teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age.”

If the Great Commission means we should be observing all Jesus commanded us, Christians should rejoice when persecuted (Mt.5:11-12), be agents of reconciliation (Mt. 5:23-25), tell the truth (Mt. 5:37), turn the other cheek (Mt. 5:38-42), love their enemies (Mt. 5:44-46), stop practicing their righteousness before men (Mt. 6:1), judge not (Mt. 7:1-3), not cast their pearls before pigs (Mt. 7:6), practice the Golden Rule (Mt. 7:12), follow the 81% narrow way (Mt. 7:13-14), beware of false prophets (Mt. 7:15-16), pray for laborers (Mt. 9:37-38), fear not (Mt. 10:28), defend their rights deny themselves (Lk 9:23-25), celebrate the poor (Luke 14:12-14), and welcome strangers (Mt. 25:35).

Jeffress is also mad about the California prohibition against singing in church. It looks like he got the news from the alt-Right, white nationalist website Breitbart:

Eric Metaxas is devoting his entire show today to re-running this.

Richard Land explains why we should still celebrate July 4th “amid this mayhem.” He uses his Christian Post editorial to attack critical race theory. Not a good look coming from the guy who said this.

Pastor Mark Burns thanks Trump for protecting Confederate monuments:

The Falkirk Center at Liberty University is using Edmund Burke to defend Confederate monuments and the white supremacy they represent.

I have many questions about this tweet, but here are two:

  1. Would the Falkirk Center feel the same way about George III, Parliament and British tyranny? Would they tear down monuments?
  2. Would the Falkirk Center like this “good, bad, and ugly” approach to American history to be applied to public school American history textbooks?

It looks like Trump will be “telling the truth” tonight in South Dakota. Here is what Falkirk Center spokesperson Jenna Ellis retweeted earlier today:

I am watching the crowd assembling at this event right now. No social distancing. No masks. The president’s job is to protect the people. This rally is immoral.

Until next time.

Donald Trump Jr. Will Speak at Liberty University This Week

Trump Jr.

Here is WSLS news:

Donald Trump Jr. will speak at Liberty University’s convocation on Wednesday to discuss his new book, “Triggered: How the Left Thrives on Hate and Wants to Silence Us.”

The convocation starts at 10:30 a.m. and will be livestreamed from the university’s Facebook page.

Liberty University’s president, Jerry Falwell Jr., said the book “exposes the schemes the left uses to silence conservatives and push socialist dogma. Liberty University students have a great opportunity to hear from a major force in American politics, and a personal friend.” 

A “major force in American politics?” Glad to know that the world’s largest evangelical university is bringing in such deep Christian thinkers about Christianity and politics.  Of course what would a court evangelical invitation to Don Jr. be without a reference to the fact that the president’s son is a “personal friend?”  🙂