Mike Pompeo’s Tweet Today is a Perversion of Christianity

Mike-Pompeo-Angry

Here is the tweet:

It would be very difficult to understand this tweet apart from Pompeo’s response yesterday to the NPR reporter who claimed that the Secretary of State screamed at her, cursed at her, and belittled her expertise following an interview.  You can get up to speed here.

Pompeo accused NPR reporter Mary Louise Kelly of lying to him.  Here is his full statement:

“NPR reporter Mary Louise Kelly lied to me, twice. First, last month, in setting up our interview and, then again yesterday, in agreeing to have our post-interview conversation off the record. It is shameful that this reporter chose to violate the basic rules of journalism and decency.

This is another example of how unhinged the media has become in its quest to hurt President Trump and this Administration. It is no wonder that the American people distrust many in the media when they so consistently demonstrate their agenda and their absence of integrity.

It is worth noting that Bangladesh is NOT Ukraine.”

Kelly, a respected reporter, claims that she did not lie to Pompeo about anything.  She told the Secretary’s staff  in advance that she would be asking questions about Ukraine.  She also claims that Pompeo did not say that the post-interview discussion was off the record.  National Public Radio CEO Michael Martin stands by Kelly.

Notice that Pompeo says nothing in this statement about his own behavior. He does not deny that Kelly’s account of his behavior is true.  And he does not apologize for the way he treated Kelly.  Pompeo’s statement suggests that if someone (allegedly) lies to you, you have the right to respond any way you want toward that person.  What kind of Christian example is this?  Again, here is my satirical addendum from last night’s post:

Hey Christian kids, when someone (allegedly) lies to you, you have every right to scream at them, mistreat them, degrade their expertise, and curse at them.  Just follow the example of evangelical role model and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and his boss Donald Trump.  Don’t listen to all the evangelical anti-Trump losers who tell you to turn the other cheek.  Just fire-back in a press release or get your public relations people to book you on Fox News.  After all, we are in the middle of the culture war.  We can’t let little things like Jesus’s words in the Sermon on the Mount get in the way when we have so much work to do in our righteous quest to restore Christian values.

Pompeo ends his statement by saying, “It is worth noting that Bangladesh is NOT Ukraine.” Here Pompeo feels the need to take one more parting shot at Kelly.  As you may recall, Pompeo pulled out a blank map and asked Kelly to identify Ukraine on it. (Who has a blank map sitting around in his “living room” just in case he needs to quiz a guest?).  Kelly claims that after she accurately identified Ukraine on the blank map, Pompeo put it away.

On this map, Ukraine is in orange and Bangledesh is in green:

Bangladesh_Ukraine_Locator

Do we really believe that Kelly, who has a masters degree in European Studies from Cambridge University in England, confused Ukraine and Bangladesh? Pompeo’s parting shot was an attempt to belittle Kelly.  This is quite fitting of the Trump administration and their GOP enablers.  When they don’t like certain questions–usually questions by women–they try to attack the intelligence of the individual asking the question.  Remember this:

And this:

And this (fast forward to the “short sentences” line at the 0:40 mark):

(Thanks to Chris Cuomo of CNN for reminding me about these videos. He ran them on his show last night).

And now we come to Pompeo’s tweet this morning.  He quotes Proverbs 10:18: “Whoever conceals hatred with lying lips and spreads slander is a fool.” Pompeo uses this verse as a weapon against Kelly.  He is saying that Kelly not only lied to him, but in doing so she showed her hatred for the Trump administration (a common GOP mantra against all critics of the president) and she is a fool.

I don’t know if Kelly lied to Pompeo.  But if I had to choose between a widely respected journalist and the representative of a presidential administration that lies endlessly to the American people, I will go with the journalist.  It is also worth noting that Pompeo’s decision to tweet a verse about lying lips is especially rich coming from Donald Trump’s Secretary of State.

Pompeo’s use of Proverbs 10:18 to attack an NPR journalist is a perversion of Christianity.  Historian Robert Caro once said, “power doesn’t corrupt, it reveals.”  Pompeo’s weaponizing of scripture here reveals what evangelical Christianity has become over the last forty years of political captivity.

 

Hey Eric Metaxas, Please Stop Using Ethnic Slurs About Italians So Cavalierly

Watch this Salem Radio love-fest between Eric Metaxas and Sebastian Gorka:

Most readers of the blog know Metaxas.  He is a court evangelical, author, and host of the Eric Metaxas Show on Salem.  Gorka’s brief and controversial stint as a Trump adviser landed him a radio show on the Christian network.

In this exchange, Metaxas and Gorka are discussing CNN anchor Chris Cuomo’s recent profanity-laced outburst toward a man who was harassing him on a family vacation.  The CNN celebrity took offense to this man calling him “Fredo,” a reference to the weak Corleone brother in The Godfather.

Cuomo claimed that “Fredo” is an ethnic slur against Italians.  I am half-Italian and grew-up around a lot of Italian family members, but I have never heard the name of the late John Cazanale‘s character in The Godfather used as a slur–ethnic or otherwise. So on this point, Metaxas and Gorka are probably correct.

But Metaxas does not stop there.  He says, “you would think that someone had called him [Cuomo] a ‘no-good guinea, wop;’ and even that’s funny in this day and age.”

I am sure Metaxas will think I am a snowflake for saying this, but calling an Italian-American a “guinea” or a “wop” is NOT funny–not even in “this day and age.”  For many Italian-Americans, especially those of a certain generation, these terms still open-up old wounds.  Perhaps Metaxas should study some Italian-American history. 

Let me be clear.  We Italian-Americans now enjoy white privilege. Today, the words “guinea” or “wop” do not have the sting that they once had.  Things have changed over time for Italian-Americans.  I would thus never equate the discrimination Italian-Americans have faced with the the plight of African-Americans in our history.  (Although I know many Italian-American political conservatives who would make this kind of moral equivalence argument).

But many of us have also sat at the feet of elders who told us stories about the prejudicial treatment they once faced.  Some of these stories are not pretty.  A few of these elders are still alive.  Some of their wounds have not completely healed.

Italians No

It is also worth noting that Metaxas appears to defend Tucker Carlson’s recent “white supremacy is a hoax” line.

At one point in the conversation Metaxas says, “In America, we have the freedom to say stupid things.” Yup.

When the Bible Gets Caught-Up in an Immigration Debate

Bible book

Check out Sarah Jones’s recent piece at The New Republic on Jeff Sessions and Romans 13, “Who Would Jesus Lock Up.”  The subtitle reads: “Using the Bible to defend the government’s most indefensible policies is a longstanding American tradition.”  Very true.

Here is a taste of Jones’s piece:

But exegesis belongs to the realm of theologians. Sessions’s comments are troublesome not because they misrepresent the Bible or constitute a needlessly religious justification for a secular policy, but because they echo some of the darkest chapters in American history.

As Christian historian John Fea told The Washington Post on Thursday, American southerners frequently cited Romans 13 in defense of the institution of slavery. “[I]n the 1840s and 1850s, when Romans 13 is invoked by defenders of the South or defenders of slavery to ward off abolitionists who believed that slavery is wrong,” he said. “I mean, this is the same argument that Southern slaveholders and the advocates of a Southern way of life made.” Slavery was legal, after all; to question Southern law was to question God.

In fact, early debates over the morality of slavery frequently played out in churches, a practice that continued as war broke out. Abolitionists had no difficulty defending the morality of their position, given the horrors of chattel slavery. Confederates, meanwhile, took up the language of a shared faith and deployed it in the service of propaganda.

Read the entire piece here.

Of course the Bible has also been used in American history to defend what some might call “defensible” positions.  Barack Obama did this all the time.  So did the Founding Fathers.

What strikes me about this whole Sessions controversy over Romans 13 is that the debate taking place online and in the media seems less about whether it is appropriate  to invoke the Bible in public debate in the first place, and more about which Bible verses should be used.

For example, here is Chris Cuomo of CNN.  Cuomo thinks Sessions’s use of Romans 13 is reprehensible. Then he goes ahead and uses his own Bible verses to show why Sessions is wrong:

Here is a piece on my friend, Holy Cross University professor Mathew Schmalz:

So what does the Bible say? College of the Holy Cross scholar and Associate Professor of Religious Studies Mathew Schmalz examined that issue more than a year ago, in an article for The Conversation.

Schmalz said the Bible is unambiguous in affirming the obligation to treat strangers with dignity and respect.

“As Matthew 25 makes clear, the Christians should see everyone as ‘Christ’ in the flesh. Indeed, scholars argue that in the New Testament, ‘stranger’ and ‘neighbor’ are in fact synonymous,” Schmalz wrote. “Thus the Golden Rule, ‘love your neighbor as yourself,’ refers not just to people whom you know – your ‘neighbors’ in a conventional sense – but also to people whom you do not know.”

Schmalz, an expert on the papacy and the founding editor of the Journal on Global Catholicism, has published opinion pieces in Newsweek, Salon, the Washington Post, Commonweal Magazine, and The National Catholic Reporter.

“It is true that the application of biblical principles to contemporary matters of policy is less than clear to the many Christians who have taken opposing sides regarding how the United States should deal with immigrants, undocumented workers and refugees,” Schmalz wrote. “However, in my reading of the Bible, the principles regarding welcoming the stranger are broad-reaching and unambiguous.”

The Southern Baptist Convention quotes Leviticus 19:33-34, Jeremiah 7:5-7, Ezekiel 47:22, Zechariah 7:9-10, Matthew 25:35-40, and Hebrews 13:23 in its recent resolution on immigration.

Here are evangelicals from the Evangelical Immigration Roundtable citing the Bible:

So when does the Bible apply to a given policy issue and when does it not?  Maybe I will just go back to being a Catholic (like Mat Schmalz and Chris Cuomo).  Then I don’t have to worry about a thousand different interpretations of the Bible and just follow what the Church teaches on the matter.

Trump and the Court Evangelicals Love Corey Stewart

I am just getting up to speed with this whole Corey Stewart story.  Here is Chris Cuomo’s CNN interview with Corey Stewart:

Here is Trump:

I can’t believe this guy won the GOP primary in Virginia.   Get up to speed here:

How Corey Stewart Could Endanger Other Virginia Republicans

How Corey Stewart is dividing Republicans already

Virginia Republicans Are Rallying Behund a True Bigot: Corey Stewart

Esquire calls him “an unapologetic public racist, and damned proud of it, who goes out of his way to associate with other unapologetic public racists, who are damned proud of it, too.”

And for readers of The Way of Improvement Leads Home, Stewart has the support of a prominent court evangelical.

This is from December 2017:

Liberty University President Jerry Falwell, Junior is endorsing Corey Stewart for U.S. Senate, that announcement today from the Stewart campaign. Both Falwell and Stewart were early Donald Trump supporters. Stewart is seeking the Republican nomination to face Democratic Senator Tim Kaine next November, and he is campaigning heavily on his support for President Trump’s agenda.

From the Corey Stewart fort Senate campaign: Republican Senatorial candidate Corey Stewart announced today he received the endorsement of Dr. Jerry Falwell, Jr.

“Corey Stewart is a fighter who will be a staunch defender of our rights and liberties in Washington.  I’m proud to announce my endorsement of Corey Stewart for U.S. Senate in Virginia,” Dr. Falwell said. “Corey is a proven vote-getter who will win back Virginia’s U.S. Senate seat for conservatives. President Trump needs a fighter like Corey in the U.S. Senate to help clean up the swamp in Washington,” Falwell asserted.

“It is vital that we turn the tide in Virginia so that President Trump’s agenda can succeed. With that in mind, I urge Virginians to back Corey Stewart for U.S. Senate,” he concluded.

Stewart responded to Falwell’s endorsement saying the following:

“Jerry Falwell has spent his life making our state and nation a better place through strong education centered first on faith, and he was instrumental in electing Donald Trump president, ” Stewart said, “Virginia’s awakening is happening, and Dr. Falwell’s endorsement is proof positive conservative Republicans will take back Virginia,” Stewart said.