The Anselm House at the University of Minnesota is Hiring an Associate Director of University Engagement

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Back in March 2011, I had a great visit to the Anselm House (at the time it was called the MacLaurin Institute) at the University of Minnesota.  I gave a lecture on the U of M campus, met with campus ministers and members of the U of M History Department, and spoke at a couple of churches.  Brian Bademan, a Notre Dame Ph.D in American history and the director of the Anselm House, hosted my visit.  I blogged about those visits here and here.

I am happy to report that the Anslem House is hiring an Associate Director of University Engagement.  I have posted the ad below.  This looks like a great position for a person of Christian faith who has a passion for promoting Christianity and the intellectual life at a major research university.

Thanks to the generosity of many donors and partnering churches, Anselm House is beginning 2019 from a position of strength, having received more than $347,000 in support from individual donors between July 1-December 31. This outpouring of generosity represents 54% of our June 30, 2019 fundraising goal, putting AnselmHouse’s development efforts ahead of schedule. The study center is serving more students, faculty, and staff at the University of Minnesota than ever before, and this is all due to God’s generous providence working through the Anselm House community. On behalf of our trustees, staff, volunteers, and those whom we serve,thank you for your commitment to advancing this critical mission to the University of Minnesota!

We are also very excited to announce that Anselm House is seeking an Associate Director of University Engagement. This position is funded through a generous three-year grant, and we intend this position to become a permanent part of our team beyond the grant period. Please be sure to forward the announcement below to any family, friends, or acquaintances who may be interested!

The Associate Director of University Engagement will be responsible for developing programs that engage the most promising intersections of the Christian tradition with the research/teaching priorities of the University of Minnesota. This person will work closely with faculty, research staff, and graduate students from a wide range of disciplines. We’re looking for someone who is winsomely Christian, thrives in interaction with a wide variety of people from across disciplines and faith/non-faith backgrounds, and is skilled at giving voice to the breadth of the Christian intellectual tradition in a public university setting. This position will be of particular interest to recent PhDs, graduate students nearing degree completion, and other scholars interested in an “alt-academic” career that keeps them deeply engaged in the academic life of the university.

To see the full description of responsibilities and qualifications, please visit our website. We will begin reviewing applications Jan. 14, and the position will remain open until filled.

Princeton Evangelical Fellowship Changes Name to “Princeton Christian Fellowship”

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The latest Christian organization to drop the label “evangelical” is Princeton Christian Fellowship (formerly Princeton Evangelical Fellowship).  The Daily Princetonian reports:

Here is a taste of Rebecca Ngu’s piece:

‘Evangelical’ has officially become a bad word. After years of deliberation, the Christian student group formerly known as the Princeton Evangelical Fellowship dropped the name it had held since it began in 1937, changing its name to Princeton Christian Fellowship earlier this school year.

The organization’s trustees and directors voted to formally change the name in May 2017 and the decision was announced this August. William “Bill” Boyce ’79, executive secretary and associate chaplain of PCF, said that the term ‘evangelical’ has become an “unnecessary hindrance” to their work. 

“There’s a growing recognition that the term evangelical is increasingly either confusing, or unknown, or misunderstood to students,” he said.

 

The word ‘evangelical’ has a long history in the United States that typically implies a core set of doctrinal beliefs. Such tenets include belief in the authority and inspiration of the Bible, centrality of the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, and the free offer of salvation through faith, according to Boyce.

“I’m old enough to think [evangelical] is a good word, but it’s reached a point where there’s so much baggage attached around it so that it’s no longer a helpful word to identify ourselves,” said Boyce.

Jay Sourbeer ’18, president of PCF, echoed Boyce, adding that the term ‘evangelical’ is “thrown around too much.”

Some people don’t know what ‘evangelical’ means, or others may hold the aforementioned beliefs, but not identify as evangelical. Others associate it negatively with certain political positions. The definition of evangelicalism has morphed and taken on “too much cultural baggage,” Boyce said, including the assumption of a political agenda.

Read the entire piece here.

As I argued back in July, the age of Trump is changing the landscape of American Christianity.

Also see our posts here (Thomas Kidd) and here (Mark Noll) and here.