Call for Papers: Newberry Library Seminar on Religion in the Americas

Newberry Building from park.2

From Religion in American History:

2018-2019 Academic Year

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Submission Deadline: June 1, 2018

The Religion and Culture in the Americas Seminar explores topics in religion and culture broadly and from interdisciplinary perspectives including social history, biography, cultural studies, visual and material culture, urban studies, and the history of ideas. We are interested in how religious belief has affected society, rather than creedal- or theological-focused studies.

The Seminar provides an opportunity for scholars to share works-in-progress, and we encourage papers that use new methods, unveil archival discoveries, or need feedback in preparation for book and journal article publication. The seminar will meet on selected Fridays during the academic year, 3-5 pm, at the Newberry Library in Chicago, Illinois.

To submit a proposal, please visit our webform at https://www.newberry.org/seminar-proposal-form and upload a one-page proposal, a statement explaining the relationship of the paper to your other work, and a brief CV.
Applications will not be accepted via email.

If you are not at present interested in giving a paper but want to receive papers and participate in the discussion, please read our Registration Information found online. The Newberry is unable to provide funds for travel or lodging for presenters and respondents, but can assist in locating discounted accommodations.

For further information about Newberry seminars, please email scholarlyseminars@newberry.org

https://www.newberry.org/newberry-seminar-religion-and-culture-americas

The Religion and Culture in the Americas Seminar is co-sponsored by Albion College, the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism at the University of Notre Dame, University of Illinois at Chicago, and Wheaton College.

The Seminar’s organizers for 2018-2019 are: Kathleen Sprows Cummings, University of Notre Dame; Karen Johnson, Wheaton College; Malachy McCarthy, Claretian Missionaries Archives; Rima Lunin Schultz, Independent Scholar; and Kevin Schultz, University of Illinois at Chicago.

Don’t Forget Your Conference on Faith and History Proposal

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I am serving as the program chair for next Fall’s CFH meeting in Grand Rapids.  I have posted the call for papers below.  The deadline for proposals is March 15, 2018.  Please consider submitting a paper or panel proposal!  Whether you are proposing a panel/session or a paper, all I need is a one-page abstract.  Don’t hesitate to contact me with questions.

And don’t forget our Secondary Teacher Initiative!

CALL FOR PAPERS

The 31st Biennial Meeting of the Conference on Faith & History

History and the Search for Meaning:  The Conference on Faith and History at 50

 October 4-6, 2018

Calvin College

Grand Rapids, Michigan


Plenary Speakers:

Margaret Bendroth (Congregational Library & Archives, Boston)

Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn (Syracuse University)  

Robert Orsi (Northwestern University)

The Conference on Faith and History (CFH) was chartered fifty years ago to uphold, study, and improve the complex relationship between Christian faith and the discipline of history.  As an organization, we are interested in how Christian faith in all its manifestations (Protestant, Catholic, Orthodox) plays a role in our lives as professionals, writers, teachers, and colleagues. Our members work at large public universities, Christian liberal arts colleges, museums, historical sites, libraries, publishing houses, churches, and K-12 schools.

In October 2018, we will gather together at Calvin College, one of the organization’s earliest sponsoring institutions, to reflect on a theme that has been at the heart of the CFH since its birth: “History and the Search for Meaning.”  During our meeting in Grand Rapids, we will consider how the study of the past—in all its fullness and complexity—might bring meaning within our institutions, neighborhoods, classrooms, and congregations, and how it might promote health and stability for our democracy in an ever-shrinking and even more dangerous world.

As always, we are eager to see papers and panel (preferred) proposals that focus on the conference theme, but we will consider submissions on any historical topic.

Proposal ideas may consider, but are not limited to, the following themes:

  • Historians and the church
  • Christian historians as public intellectuals
  • Thinking Christianly about the history of race and gender
  • Teaching as Christian historians (at both the university and K-12 level)
  • The role of the Christian historian in teaching and writing about under-represented groups
  • Christian historians and the history of justice and inequality
  • Christianity and historiography
  • The social responsibility of the Christian historian
  • Christian faith and the writing of history
  • The role of the history major and the place of historical study in the academy
  • Spiritual disciplines and the work of Christian scholarship and teaching
  • The relationship between theology and the work of the historian
  • History and citizenship
  • The calling or vocation of the Christian historian/scholar
  • The influence of the Internet and social media on Christian scholarship
  • Digital history and the Christian historian
  • History and the state of the “evangelical mind”
  • History and advocacy
  • Christians and graduate training in history
  • Stories of women and seeking meaning through the study of the past
  • History and Christian mission
  • History and the moral imagination

Individual paper and/or complete session proposals may be sent to:

 John Fea, Messiah College:  jfea(at)Messiah(dot)edu

 DEADLINE: 15 March, 2018

 Decisions will be made on or before April 30, 2018.

Details about the Conference on Faith and History and forthcoming information about local arrangements can be found at the CFH website: faithandhistory.org

Call for Papers: Pennsylvania Historical Association Annual Meeting

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It is in Lancaster this year.  Here is the call for papers as posted at New York History blog:

The Pennsylvania Historical Association have announced they are now accepting proposals for its 2018 annual meeting to be held in Lancaster, PA from October 11-13.

The program committee welcomes and encourages proposals on all aspects of Pennsylvania and Mid-Atlantic history.

The conference theme is “City, County, Commonwealth, and Country: Local and Regional History as America’s History,” with proposals especially encouraged in the areas of material culture, public history, and oral history. Full session proposals are strongly preferred, but the committee will also consider individual paper proposals. Sessions may be arranged as either paper panels or roundtable discussions. The program committee also invites proposals for our student research poster session.

If you have suggestions for panel or plenary sessions related to the conference theme, contact the program chair, Dr. Michael Birkner (Gettysburg College) at mbirkner@gettysburg.edu. The annual meeting is hosted by LancasterHistory.org.

Proposals must be submitted electronically by March 10, 2018.

One Month Left: Don’t Forget to Submit Your Proposal to the 50th Anniversary Meeting of the Conference on Faith and History

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I am serving as the program chair for next Fall’s CFH meeting in Grand Rapids.  I have posted the call for papers below.  The deadline for proposals is March 15, 2018.  Please consider submitting a paper or panel proposal!  Whether you are proposing a panel/session or a paper, all I need is a one-page abstract.  Don’t hesitate to contact me with questions.

CALL FOR PAPERS

The 31st Biennial Meeting of the Conference on Faith & History

History and the Search for Meaning:  The Conference on Faith and History at 50

 October 4-6, 2018

Calvin College

Grand Rapids, Michigan


Plenary Speakers:

Margaret Bendroth (Congregational Library & Archives, Boston)

Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn (Syracuse University)  

Robert Orsi (Northwestern University)

The Conference on Faith and History (CFH) was chartered fifty years ago to uphold, study, and improve the complex relationship between Christian faith and the discipline of history.  As an organization, we are interested in how Christian faith in all its manifestations (Protestant, Catholic, Orthodox) plays a role in our lives as professionals, writers, teachers, and colleagues. Our members work at large public universities, Christian liberal arts colleges, museums, historical sites, libraries, publishing houses, churches, and K-12 schools.

In October 2018, we will gather together at Calvin College, one of the organization’s earliest sponsoring institutions, to reflect on a theme that has been at the heart of the CFH since its birth: “History and the Search for Meaning.”  During our meeting in Grand Rapids, we will consider how the study of the past—in all its fullness and complexity—might bring meaning within our institutions, neighborhoods, classrooms, and congregations, and how it might promote health and stability for our democracy in an ever-shrinking and even more dangerous world.

As always, we are eager to see papers and panel (preferred) proposals that focus on the conference theme, but we will consider submissions on any historical topic.

Proposal ideas may consider, but are not limited to, the following themes:

  • Historians and the church
  • Christian historians as public intellectuals
  • Thinking Christianly about the history of race and gender
  • Teaching as Christian historians (at both the university and K-12 level)
  • The role of the Christian historian in teaching and writing about under-represented groups
  • Christian historians and the history of justice and inequality
  • Christianity and historiography
  • The social responsibility of the Christian historian
  • Christian faith and the writing of history
  • The role of the history major and the place of historical study in the academy
  • Spiritual disciplines and the work of Christian scholarship and teaching
  • The relationship between theology and the work of the historian
  • History and citizenship
  • The calling or vocation of the Christian historian/scholar
  • The influence of the Internet and social media on Christian scholarship
  • Digital history and the Christian historian
  • History and the state of the “evangelical mind”
  • History and advocacy
  • Christians and graduate training in history
  • Stories of women and seeking meaning through the study of the past
  • History and Christian mission
  • History and the moral imagination

Individual paper and/or complete session proposals may be sent to:

 John Fea, Messiah College:  jfea(at)Messiah(dot)edu

 DEADLINE: 15 March, 2018

 Decisions will be made on or before April 30, 2018.

Details about the Conference on Faith and History and forthcoming information about local arrangements can be found at the CFH website: faithandhistory.org

Call for Papers: American Catholic Historical Association 2018 Spring Meeting

Mount

It will be held April 12-15 at Mount St. Mary’s University in Emmitsburg, Maryland.

The ACHA is now accepting individual papers and panels for inclusion in its 2018 spring meeting to be held April 12-15 at historic Mount St. Mary’s University in Emmitsburg, Md. We invite ACHA members and other interested scholars to submit paper and session proposals on any aspect of the history of Christianity and its interaction with culture.

The submission deadline has been extended to: Tuesday, February 20, 2018 at 11:59 PM Eastern Time.

To submit a proposal, please follow the appropriate link below:

Don’t Forget to Submit Your Proposals for the 2018 Meeting of the Conference on Faith and History

I am serving as the program chair for next Fall’s CFH meeting in Grand Rapids.  I have posted the call for papers below.  The deadline for proposals is March 15, 2018.  Please consider submitting a paper or panel proposal!  Whether you are proposing a panel/session or a paper, all I need is a one-page abstract.  Don’t hesitate to contact me with questions.

cfh-header-2

CALL FOR PAPERS

The 31st Biennial Meeting of the Conference on Faith & History

History and the Search for Meaning:  The Conference on Faith and History at 50

 October 4-6, 2018

Calvin College

Grand Rapids, Michigan


Plenary Speakers:

Margaret Bendroth (Congregational Library & Archives, Boston)

Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn (Syracuse University)  

Robert Orsi (Northwestern University)

The Conference on Faith and History (CFH) was chartered fifty years ago to uphold, study, and improve the complex relationship between Christian faith and the discipline of history.  As an organization, we are interested in how Christian faith in all its manifestations (Protestant, Catholic, Orthodox) plays a role in our lives as professionals, writers, teachers, and colleagues. Our members work at large public universities, Christian liberal arts colleges, museums, historical sites, libraries, publishing houses, churches, and K-12 schools.

In October 2018, we will gather together at Calvin College, one of the organization’s earliest sponsoring institutions, to reflect on a theme that has been at the heart of the CFH since its birth: “History and the Search for Meaning.”  During our meeting in Grand Rapids, we will consider how the study of the past—in all its fullness and complexity—might bring meaning within our institutions, neighborhoods, classrooms, and congregations, and how it might promote health and stability for our democracy in an ever-shrinking and even more dangerous world.

As always, we are eager to see papers and panel (preferred) proposals that focus on the conference theme, but we will consider submissions on any historical topic.

Proposal ideas may consider, but are not limited to, the following themes:

  • Historians and the church
  • Christian historians as public intellectuals
  • Thinking Christianly about the history of race and gender
  • Teaching as Christian historians (at both the university and K-12 level)
  • The role of the Christian historian in teaching and writing about under-represented groups
  • Christian historians and the history of justice and inequality
  • Christianity and historiography
  • The social responsibility of the Christian historian
  • Christian faith and the writing of history
  • The role of the history major and the place of historical study in the academy
  • Spiritual disciplines and the work of Christian scholarship and teaching
  • The relationship between theology and the work of the historian
  • History and citizenship
  • The calling or vocation of the Christian historian/scholar
  • The influence of the Internet and social media on Christian scholarship
  • Digital history and the Christian historian
  • History and the state of the “evangelical mind”
  • History and advocacy
  • Christians and graduate training in history
  • Stories of women and seeking meaning through the study of the past
  • History and Christian mission
  • History and the moral imagination

Individual paper and/or complete session proposals may be sent to:

 John Fea, Messiah College:  jfea(at)Messiah(dot)edu

 DEADLINE: 15 March, 2018

 Decisions will be made on or before April 30, 2018.

Details about the Conference on Faith and History and forthcoming information about local arrangements can be found at the CFH website: faithandhistory.org

Call for Papers: Conference on Faith and History Biennial Meeting

I am serving as the program chair for next Fall’s CFH meeting in Grand Rapids.  I have posted the call for papers below.  Please consider submitting a paper or panel proposal!  Don’t hesitate to contact me with questions.  –JF

cfh-header-2

CALL FOR PAPERS

The 31st Biennial Meeting of the Conference on Faith & History

History and the Search for Meaning:  The Conference on Faith and History at 50

 October 4-6, 2018

Calvin College

Grand Rapids, Michigan


Plenary Speakers:

Margaret Bendroth (Congregational Library & Archives, Boston)

Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn (Syracuse University)  

Robert Orsi (Northwestern University)

The Conference on Faith and History (CFH) was chartered fifty years ago to uphold, study, and improve the complex relationship between Christian faith and the discipline of history.  As an organization, we are interested in how Christian faith in all its manifestations (Protestant, Catholic, Orthodox) plays a role in our lives as professionals, writers, teachers, and colleagues. Our members work at large public universities, Christian liberal arts colleges, museums, historical sites, libraries, publishing houses, churches, and K-12 schools.

In October 2018, we will gather together at Calvin College, one of the organization’s earliest sponsoring institutions, to reflect on a theme that has been at the heart of the CFH since its birth: “History and the Search for Meaning.”  During our meeting in Grand Rapids, we will consider how the study of the past—in all its fullness and complexity—might bring meaning within our institutions, neighborhoods, classrooms, and congregations, and how it might promote health and stability for our democracy in an ever-shrinking and even more dangerous world.

As always, we are eager to see papers and panel (preferred) proposals that focus on the conference theme, but we will consider submissions on any historical topic.

Proposal ideas may consider, but are not limited to, the following themes:

  • Historians and the church
  • Christian historians as public intellectuals
  • Thinking Christianly about the history of race and gender
  • Teaching as Christian historians (at both the university and K-12 level)
  • The role of the Christian historian in teaching and writing about under-represented groups
  • Christian historians and the history of justice and inequality
  • Christianity and historiography
  • The social responsibility of the Christian historian
  • Christian faith and the writing of history
  • The role of the history major and the place of historical study in the academy
  • Spiritual disciplines and the work of Christian scholarship and teaching
  • The relationship between theology and the work of the historian
  • History and citizenship
  • The calling or vocation of the Christian historian/scholar
  • The influence of the Internet and social media on Christian scholarship
  • Digital history and the Christian historian
  • History and the state of the “evangelical mind”
  • History and advocacy
  • Christians and graduate training in history
  • Stories of women and seeking meaning through the study of the past
  • History and Christian mission
  • History and the moral imagination

Individual paper and/or complete session proposals may be sent to:

 John Fea, Messiah College:  jfea(at)Messiah(dot)edu

 DEADLINE: 15 March, 2018

 Decisions will be made on or before April 30, 2018.

Details about the Conference on Faith and History and forthcoming information about local arrangements can be found at the CFH website: faithandhistory.org

Call For Papers: Newberry Seminar on Religion and Culture in the Americas

Newberry

Here is the call:

The Religion and Culture in the Americas Seminar explores topics in religion and culture broadly and from interdisciplinary perspectives including social history, biography, cultural studies, visual and material culture, urban studies, and the history of ideas. We are interested in how religious belief has affected society, rather than creedal- or theological-focused studies.

The Seminar provides an opportunity for scholars to share works-in-progress, and we encourage papers that use new methods, unveil archival discoveries, or need feedback in preparation for book and journal article publication.

Seminar sessions are held on Fridays from 3pm to 5pm at the Newberry, 60 West Walton Street, Chicago, Illinois.

The Religion and Culture in the Americas 2017-2018 Call for Proposals is now OPEN. Proposals for 2017-2018 will be accepted until June 30, 2017. Click here for a pdf flyer of the Religion and Culture in the Americas Proposal brief. To submit a proposal, please visit our webform and upload a one-page proposal, a statement explaining the relationship of the paper to your other work, and a brief CV. Applications will not be accepted via email or in hard copy.

The Seminar’s organizers for 2017-2018 are: Kathleen Sprows Cummings, University of Notre Dame; Karen Johnson, Wheaton College; Deborah Kanter, Albion College; Malachy McCarthy, Claretian Missionaries Archives; Rima Lunin Schultz, Independent Scholar; and Kevin Schultz, University of Illinois Chicago.

The Religion and Culture in the Americas Seminar is co-sponsored by Albion College, the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism at the University of Notre Dame, University of Illinois at Chicago, and Wheaton College.

Call for Papers: 2017 Eastern American Studies Association Meeting, Harrisburg

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Come out to our neck of the woods for what appears to be a great regional American studies conference. This looks like a great opportunity for undergraduates as well.  Here is the call for papers from Penn State-Harrisburg American Studies professor Simon Bronner:

The 2017 Annual Conference of the Eastern American Studies Association (EASA) meeting jointly with the Mid-Atlantic Folklife Association and the Society of Americanists

Deadline for Proposals: January 16, 2017Theme: “Milestones, Markers, and Moments: Turning Points in American Experience and Tradition”
Date: March 31-April 1, 2017
Venue: Harrisburg Hilton, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

In the upcoming year, Americans might reflect on several critical moments of the nation’s past and anticipate markers of the future that will define its experience and tradition. One hundred years ago in April 2017, the United States entered World War I to make the world “safe for democracy,” according to President Woodrow Wilson. Fifty years ago in January 1967, the Green Bay Packers and Kansas City Chiefs competed in the first Super Bowl in Los Angeles. That spring, urban racial violence erupted, and by June and July it would reach significant magnitude in Boston, Tampa, and Newark. By summer’s end, over 150 cities had exploded. The year wound to its end with over 100,000 people marching on Washington to protest their country’s prosecution of the Vietnam War.

The year 1967 also saw turning points in the academic world. Responding to the racial unrest of the late sixties, the American Studies Association executive committee had elected the distinguished African-American scholar John Hope Franklin as its president. He would preside at the association’s first national convention in October. At Penn State Harrisburg, for the first time the graduating class included American Studies majors. Twenty years before that, Franklin & Marshall College had created the first folklore department in the state, and a public state folklorist position with an Americanist focus was created.

At both the national and local level, these events rank as milestones for the country and its study.

This year, EASA, in partnership with the Middle Atlantic Folklife Association and the incipient Society of Americanists, a coalition of persons and organizations devoted to the study of American culture, invites proposals for papers, panels, forums, and workshops related to the broad theme of turning points in American history, folklife, education, cultural conservation, heritage, and society. The program committee is particularly interested in examples of public memory and memorialization that have played notable roles in American culture and its global reach. Closer to the present, we also invite analyses of the presidential election of 2016 as a milestone event, already distinguished historically by the first woman to run for president as candidate of a major party.

The EASA hopes for presentations suggested by the conference theme and its discussion. As well, we welcome panels on topics of significance to scholars engaged in the practice of American Studies that the conference theme otherwise might exclude. We are, in other words, open to proposals that fall outside the conference theme.
Submission Guidelines:

For Individual Presenters: Send a short abstract (no more than 200 words) and a brief CV or resume (no more than two pages). Place your name and email address on both documents.

For Pre-formed Panels: Send a cover sheet with the title of the panel, the names of each participant, and the titles of their presentations. Include a short abstract of each paper (no more than 200 words each) as well as a brief CV or resume for each panel participant (no longer than two pages).

All materials should be sent to Jennifer Drissel (jzd5551@psu.edu) before Monday, January 16, 2017. Those affiliated with either MAFA or SOA should also send proposals/CVs to Jennifer Drissel and should indicate their organizational affiliation in their submission. In some cases, a submitter may indicate more than one affiliation.

Graduate students whose proposals are accepted will be encouraged to submit their final papers electronically several weeks prior to the conference to be considered for the Simon J. Bronner Award for the outstanding graduate paper in American Studies. The conference will also host an Undergraduate Roundtable. Faculty members interested in having their undergraduate students present research at the conference should contact Dr. Francis Ryan of La Salle University (ryan@lasalle.edu). Roundtable participants will compete for the Francis Ryan Award, awarded annually to the outstanding undergraduate paper.

Any general questions can be directed to John Haddad of Penn State Harrisburg (jrh36@psu.edu). For more information, including our downloadable newsletter, see the EASA website: https://harrisburg.psu.edu/…/confere…/2017-annual-conference.

Call for Papers: *American Baptist Quarterly*

“Baptists and Conscience in Public: Legacy and Future Implications”

Baptists have long been noted as people of conscience. From the days of Roger Williams to the work of E.Y. Mullins to the witness to Martin Luther King, Jr., conscience is one of the hallmarks of Baptist thought, witness, and work. But historical explorations of Baptists and conscience have focused on two primary themes: individual freedom of conscience, and dissent from authority.

This focus has largely neglected the relationship between the Christian conscience and public debates. What contributions have Baptists made with regards to how to approach public issues of religious liberty and ethics? And in what ways have Baptists accounts of conscience offered something distinctive? In an age when issues of religious liberty, the common good, protection of minority interests, and surveillance, recovering what Baptists have to offer with regards to conscience is of prime importance.

This issue of the American Baptist Quarterly explicitly solicits articles on this issue: investigating the nature, role, and legacy of Baptist thought on conscience. Articles should be historical explorations of seminal figures, events, and movements in which Baptist appeals to conscience have shaped Baptist life and thought. Possible historical explorations include, but are not limited to:

  • Conscience and objection to war
  • Religious liberty in the 20th century
  • The relationship between Baptist polity and civic law
  • Liturgical freedom and legal forms of liberty
  • Gender, conscience, and public reason
  • Conscience and the limits of religious liberty 
  • The relationship between individual, ecclesial, and civic conscience
  • Baptists and the prophetic national conscience
  • Church, state, and conscience in the 19th and 20th century 
  • Conscience, equality, and the public square
  • Global Christianity, Baptists, and unity
  • Western Christianity and Baptist advocacy
  • Baptists and the conscience of marginalized groups

Abstracts for essays (500 words) should be submitted no later than December 31st, 2015 to Myles Werntz (Palm Beach Atlantic University) atmyles_werntz@pba.edu

Call for Papers: 30th Biennial Meeting of the Conference on Faith and History

From the Conference on Faith and History Facebook page:

Christian Historians and the Challenges of Race, Gender, and Identity

The 30th Biennial Meeting of the Conference on Faith & History
CALL FOR PAPERS

October 20-22, 2016
DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION: March 15, 2016 for the General Conference (October 20-22) and April 15, 2016 for the Student Research Conference (October 19-20)
Plenary Speakers: Kate Bowler Thomas S. Kidd, Veronica Gutierrez

The General CFH Conference chair, Beth Allison Barr, has issued a call for papers for the Fall 2016 Biennial Meeting of the Conference on Faith and History at Regent University in picturesque Virginia Beach, Virginia. The deadline for submission is March 15, 2016 for the General Conference (October 20-22) and April 15, 2016 for the Student Research Conference (October 19-20). The conference theme will be “Christian Historians and the Challenges of Race, Gender, and Identity,” but papers on any topic will be considered.

In today’s political and social climate, issues of race, gender, and identity continually polarize much of public discourse and historical scholarship. As Christian historians, our challenge is to address these contentious issues in ways that responsibly deal with contemporary events, with the past, and with our faith. We seek to bring our research and our faith into engagement with our culture, an often complicated and contentious pursuit. As historians, what is our responsibility in addressing current discourses and debates over race, gender, and identity?
What are the ways in which our work and our theology should shape our engagement in the present? In what ways should today’s debates over race, gender, and identity shape our research and our teaching?

Here is a non-exhaustive list of ideas you may want to consider for paper and panel sessions.
*Christian Historians’ Responsibility to the Church concerning Gender Roles
*Engaging Issues of Race, Gender, and/or Christian Identity in Global history
*Christian Historians’ Response to Issues of Race and/or Gender within Academia
*Christian Historians’ Response to the Treatment of Women in the Professional Academy
*How Christian Intellectuals Have Engaged Race and/or Gender
*How Race and/or Gender Impact Religious History
*How Theology Shapes Understandings of Race and/or Gender
*Teaching Women’s History and its Significance as Christian Historians
*Teaching about Race as Christian Historians
*Engaging Race and/or Gender in Survey Courses
*Writing Gender History
*Christian Historians, Issues of Race and/or Gender, and Trigger Warnings within the Classroom
*Christian Historians and Engagement with Political Debates on Race, Gender, and Identity

If you have ideas for sessions, individual papers, or panel discussions, please send them to Beth Allison Barr
(Beth_Barr@baylor.edu) at Baylor University of Josh McMullen (jmmcmullen@regent.edu) at Regent University.

Call for Papers: African American Intellectual History Society Conference

.W.E.B. Du Bois and Ida Wells

Here is the call for papers:

The African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS) invites proposals for its first annual conference scheduled to take place at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill on March 10-11, 2016Proposals are due on November 15, 2015.
Through a series of papers, panel sessions, roundtable discussions, films, and talks, this two-day conference will explore the vital contributions that black artists, writers, activists, and thinkers have made to U.S. and global intellectual history. Focusing on theorizing black intellectual history, forging community connections, and integrating the digital humanities into historical research, the conference will explore the individual and group contributions of black intellectuals and black institutions to national and global politics, racial ideologies, social justice movements, popular culture, and more.
AAIHS welcomes proposals from scholars at all career stages (from graduate students to senior faculty), as well as independent scholars. We welcome submissions for scholarly papers (20-minute presentations), organized panels of four papers, poster sessions, lecture-demonstrations, film/video screenings, or workshops. Proposals should be submitted via email (aaihs10@gmail.com) as a Microsoft Word attachment no later than November 15, 2015.The conference organizers will notify participants of acceptances by December 30, 2015.
Paper proposals should include an abstract of no more than 250 words and an abridged C.V. (1-2 pages). Panel proposals should include a 250-word abstract and abridged C.V. for each presenter in addition to a 250-word panel description. All submissions should include the name(s) of presenter(s), institutional affiliation, title of presentation, format of presentation (paper, panel, poster, workshop, etc.), e-mail address, phone number, and A/V equipment requirements.
All participants must be registered for the conference by February 1, 2016 ($20 for AAIHS members; $60 for non-members). For all further inquiries, please contact aaihs10@gmail.comor visit our website for more information: www.aaihs.org
Conference Organizers:

Call for Papers: "Empires of Liberty and the American Revolution"

Sons of the American Revolution: Annual Conference on the American Revolution
June 10-12, 2016, Pasadena, CA
Empires of Liberty and the American Revolution

In a 1780 letter to George Rogers Clark, Thomas Jefferson spoke of an “empire of liberty,” claiming that if Clark succeeded in his maneuvers in the Northwest, he would “add to the Empire of liberty an extensive and fertile Country.”  Jefferson is not the only American to use the phrase.  In 1786, John Adams wrote that “It has ever been my hobby-horse to see rising in America an empire of liberty, and a prospect of two or three hundred millions of freemen, without one noble or one king among them.”  Others expressed similar sentiments.  In his last “Circular to the States,” General Washington noted that “the foundation of our empire was not laid in the gloomy age of Ignorance and Superstition, but at an Epocha when the rights of mankind were better understood and more clearly defined, than at any former period.”  Given the republican leanings of America’s founding generation, this imperial language is jarring, and perhaps paradoxical.   Even so, it reminds us that the American Revolution grew out of a crisis in the British Empire, and that the imperial problems the colonists faced in the 1760s and 1770s did not go away 1776.  In some ways, the difficulties they faced were those of reconciling empire with liberty in an independent America and in a world of competing empires.

This problem, even paradox, of “the empire of liberty” is the theme of the 2016 Sons of the American Revolution Annual Conference on the American Revolution.  The conference will focus on the crisis in the British Empire that led to the American Revolution, and the efforts after 1776 to resolve, or at least manage, the imperial problem or problems. 

In support of their Congressional mandate to encourage historical research, the Sons of the American Revolution invites paper proposals from graduate students and advanced scholars in history and political science on any aspect of the themes of empire or empires of liberty in the American Revolution.

The 2016 conference will honor Jack P. Greene for his years of distinguished service as a scholar of American history and mentor to so many students.  The subject matter of the conference pays tribute to Professor Greene’s deep study of the British empire in North America, and of the constitutional history of the American Revolution.

Publication of accepted papers in a published volume is anticipated.  The SAR will cover presenters’ travel and lodging expenses, and shall offer a $500 stipend.

Papers will be delivered in Pasadena, California, June 10-12, 2016.  Paper proposals should include a short, 250 word abstract of the proposed paper and a short CV, and be submitted to Richard Samuelson, (rsamuels@csusb.edu), Associate Professor of History, California State University, San Bernardino, by November 31, 2015.

Conference on the Bible at IUPUI

Call for Papers:  The Bible in American Life
Conference: 6-9 August 2014, Indianapolis, IN

The Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis welcomes individual paper proposals on the topic of the Bible in American Life. Focusing on how Americans past and present have used the Bible in their daily lives, the conference (6-9 August 2014 in Indianapolis) will be interdisciplinary in nature, with scholars from various perspectives offering analyses from historical, cultural, sociological, and theological approaches, among others.

Thanks to a generous grant from Lilly Endowment, the Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture will cover travel, lodging, and food expenses related to the conference. Additionally, authors will receive a $1000 stipend for participation in the project. More details below the fold.

The culmination of a three-year study, the conference will have as its touchstone The Bible in American Life Report, which will be released in February 2014. This report, the result of survey questions on both the General Social Survey and the National Congregations Study III, offers sociological data about the role of the Bible in the daily lives of Americans. Conference papers need not interact with the report directly, but we encourage proposals that consider some of the report’s findings in their larger historical, cultural, sociological, or theological contexts.

The Bible in American Life Project seeks to provide the first large-scale investigation of the Bible in American life. It is driven by the recognition that though the Bible has been central to Christian practice throughout American history, many important questions remain unanswered in scholarship, including how people have read the Bible for themselves outside of worship, how denominational and parachurch organizations have influenced interpretation and application, and how clergy and congregations have influenced individual understandings of scripture. These questions are even more pressing today as denominations are losing much of their traditional authority, technology is changing people’s reading and cognitive habits, and subjective experience is continuing to eclipse textual authority as the mark of true religion.


We welcome proposals for papers (20-25 minutes) that focus on some aspect of Americans’ reading and use of scripture outside formal worship services. Papers that complement one another and expand on the historical and cultural understandings of the report will be published in a collected volume. Paper proposals must include a general overview of the argument and evidence to be presented in no more than three pages and a short CV (3 pages). Deadline for receiving proposals is March 14, 2014. Proposals should be sent electronically to raac@iupui.edu; please use “Bible in America” as the subject heading

Call for Papers: Spring Meeting of the American Society of Church History in Oxford

The American Society of Church History (ASCH) and the Ecclesiastical History Society in Britain (EHS) will be holding a special joint meeting, Thursday to Saturday, April 3-5, 2014, in Oxford, England.

The primary theme of the conference is Migration and Mission in Christian History. The program committee invites proposals for individual papers or full sessions on this theme. Papers could examine themes such as: Christianity in migrant communities in the early generations of re-settlement; missionary efforts directed towards non-Christian migrants or those from a different Christian tradition; or the migrations of missionaries themselves.
From the scattering of the Jerusalem Church in 70CE through the ‘barbarian’ invasions of the Roman Empire, the Anglo-Saxon and Viking settlements of England, and the migrations of the religious refugees in the Reformation era, to the Atlantic slave trade, the Irish, Scottish and European diasporas of the nineteenth century and the African and Asian ones of the twentieth, people movements have profoundly shaped the course of Christian history. They have disrupted religious commitments, forged new ones, and inspired and constrained mission. There is hence enormous scope for papers from all periods of Christian history.
The ASCH and EHS hope to produce an edited volume and/or special issue ofChurch History with papers from the conference that engage explicitly with the above theme. Individual paper proposals and proposals that are part of a session must relate to the above theme in order to be considered for publication.
The program committee also invites ASCH members, EHS members, and other interested scholars to submit session proposals on any aspect of the history of Christianity and its interaction with culture. These could include proposals for formal sessions, panel and round table discussions, consideration of a major recent book, critical assessments of a distinguished career, and other relevant themes and issues. Panels should exhibit diversity of gender, rank, and scholarly location in their composition: those bringing together scholars from both societies would be especially welcome.
Sessions will be two hours in length and should allow for three or four papers, a formal response, and Q&A with the audience.
There will be two deadlines for proposals: 21 October 2013 and 20 January 2014 (12 noon, London time). The earlier deadline will allow the program committee to make decisions by late November/early December 2013, to facilitate the booking of flights. It is possible that, if the program is already quite full, only a limited number of proposals submitted to the second deadline will be accepted.
Paper proposals should consist of:-
1) A short description of less than 300 words
2) A biographical paragraph or CV summary of the applicant
3) A current mailing location, e-mail address, and phone number for the proposed presenter.
Session proposals should contain all of the above for each of the presenters as well as:-
1) The session title
2) A brief description of less than 300 words outlining the theme or topic of the session
3) Biographical data and contact details for the chair and the respondent (which can be the same person)
The availability of audio-visual equipment cannot be guaranteed at this stage, but please indicate if you would like to use it if possible.
Please send proposals, by e-mail, to JohnWolffe-PA@open.ac.uk.
Further information about the conference will be available in due course on ASCH and EHS websites, and will be e-mailed to those whose proposals are accepted. The program committee reserves the right to reconfigure sessions as needed.
NOTE: All program participants must register for the conference and be members of the ASCH or EHS (which can offer temporary membership) at the time of the Meeting.
John Wolffe, President of the EHS and Program Chair
Bruce Hindmarsh, President of the ASCH

Call for Papers: Virginia Forum

CALL FOR PAPERS
VIRGINIA FORUM
March 13-15, 2014
TRAFFIC

We are happy to invite paper and panel proposals for the ninth annual Virginia Forum, which will be held at George Mason University on March 13-15, 2014. The Virginia Forum is an interdisciplinary conference that brings together academics, teachers, writers, archivists, museum curators, historic site interpreters, librarians, and others engaged in the study and interpretation of Virginia history and culture to share their knowledge, research, and experience. The Forum welcomes proposals from scholars, teachers, students, and professionals in all fields.

This year’s theme is “Traffic.” From familiar modern concerns with transportation to more general processes of commerce, both licit and illicit, to historic modes of exchange and interaction between people, issues of “Traffic” have pervaded Virginia’s history. Potential topics might address (but are in no way limited to) such areas as:

• roads, canals, railroads, and related transportation infrastructure
• the economic, social, and cultural role of automobiles
• the history of particular businesses, industries, or commodities
• the slave trade, both domestic and international
• cultural contact and exchange between Euro-Americans and native peoples
• immigration and emigration
• the creation, maintenance, or transgression of racial boundaries

The theme is meant to inspire proposals, but it is not exclusive. Proposals on all topics related to the history and culture of Virginia are welcome, as are proposals for creative presentation formats, such as poster sessions, roundtables, workshops, or demonstrations.

Proposal Deadline: September 30, 2013

Please submit proposals by the deadline to: vaforum@gmu.edu<mailto:vaforum@gmu.edu>>

For Individual Presentations:
Please submit a one-page proposal and a one-page curriculum vitae with up-to-date contact information in a single Word/pdf document.

For Panels:
Proposals for complete panel sessions, workshops, etc. are encouraged. Submissions should include: 1) a one-page description of the overall session; 2) a separate, one-page description for each individual presentation in the session; and 3) a one-page curriculum vitae for each panel member, including the moderator, if one is included in the proposal. Please combine all of the above in a single Word/pdf document, and please be sure to include the email address and other contact  information for the panel’s primary organizer.

For Those Interested in Moderating a Session:
Please submit a brief description of your area(s) of interest/specialization and a one-page curriculum vitae with up-to-date contact information in a single Word/pdf document.

Additional information is available online at www.virginiaforum.org>.

Direct further inquiries to: vaforum@gmu.ed<mailto:vaforum@gmu.ed>>u

Call for Papers: Winter Meeting of the American Society of Church History

If you want to present a paper at the Winter meeting of the American Society of Church History in Washington D.C. there are two deadlines to consider:

February 15, 2013:  For joint AHA/ASCH session proposals.  (These need to be submitted to the AHA program committee)

March 15, 2013:  To submit a paper or session proposal to the ASCH Program committee.

Here is the call for papers:

The annual Winter meeting of the American Society of Church History (ASCH) will be held Thursday to Sunday, January 2-5, 2014, in Washington, DC, in conjunction with the annual meeting of the American Historical Association (AHA). We invite ASCH members and other interested scholars to submit paper and session proposals on any aspect of the history of Christianity and its interaction with culture, including proposals for formal papers, panel and round table discussions, consideration of a major recent book, critical assessments of a distinguished career, and other relevant themes and issues.

In addition to traditional categories relating to periods, geographical areas, and special topics, we will give special consideration to proposals that consider broader themes across periods or regions; engage in interdisciplinary discussion; place theological ideas in historical context; examine particular genres, source materials or methods; or treat the current state of the study of church history. We also invite sessions that deal with pedagogical issues of concern in the teaching of the history of Christianity, or with issues in the publication and dissemination of research to specialist and general audiences. Panels should exhibit diversity of gender, rank, and scholarly location in their composition.
Proposals for entire panels/sessions are strongly preferred, though proposals for individual papers will also be considered. The committee welcomes international participation and particularly encourages proposals (whether for full panels or individual papers) from those who live and work outside the United States. Sessions are typically two hours in length and allow for three or four papers, a formal response, and Q&A with the audience. The theme for the general meeting of the American Historical Association will be “Disagreement, Debate, Discussion.”  The Committee will particularly appreciate proposals that address this broad theme, perhaps by tackling the following kinds of issues:

Disagreement, Debate, Discussion within or between Christian communities

Disagreement, Debate, Discussion between Christians and other religious traditions

The deadline for ASCH proposals is March 15, 2013.

For those interested in submitting joint proposals to the AHA and the ASCH, the deadline for AHA proposals is February 15, 2013. See the AHA Submitting a Proposal page.

Paper proposals should consist of (1) a short description of less than 300 words, (2) a biographical paragraph or CV summary of the applicant, and (3) a current mailing location, email address, and phone number for the proposed presenter. Session proposals should contain all of the above for each of the presenters as well as (1) the session title, (2) a brief description of less than 300 words outlining the theme or topic of the session, and (3) biographical data and contact details for the chair and the respondent (which can be the same person). Use of audio-visual equipment, typically limited to the hotel provider’s equipment, has become very expensive, and must be restricted to presentations for which it is strictly necessary. The proposed use of computers, internet, or projectors in the session must therefore be stated and rationalized in the proposal.

Please send proposals, preferably by email, before March 15, 2013, to the program committee at ASCH@nd.edu.
Acknowledgements and further information will be sent out as proposals are received. The program committee reserves the right to reconfigure sessions as needed.

NOTE: All program participants must register for the annual meeting and be members of the ASCH at the time of the Meetin