Watch Springsteen’s convocation address at Boston College

Get up to speed at the end of this post.

If you don’t want to watch the entire thing, here are the highlights:

Context: (For more on Created and Called for Community at Messiah University click here).

Liberty University’s Falkirk Center meets all expectations at its “Get Louder” event

Yesterday, Liberty University’s Falkirk Center, the culture war wing of the largest Christian university in the world, held a 1-day conference titled “Get Louder: Faith Summit 2020.” Evangelical Trump supporters were encouraged to yell and scream more, fight more, and make sure that they were active on every social media platform. This is how the Kingdom of God will advance and Christian America will be saved because in the minds of the speakers, and probably most of those in attendance, there is little difference between the two. There was virtually nothing said about civility, humility, empathy, peace, compassion, the common good, or justice for people of color or the poor.

If there is any doubt that the Falkirk Center, with its angry and bitter political rhetoric and unswerving support of Donald Trump, represents Liberty University, those doubts were put to rest in the first fifteen minutes of the event. The day began with a video from the late Jerry Falwell Sr.:

This was followed by a welcome from Liberty University Provost Scott Hicks. Scott Lamb, Liberty’s Vice President for Communications, also welcomed the audience and praised the work of the Falkirk Center.

Falkirk Center director Ryan Helfenbein introduced the day’s festivities:

The first plenary speaker was former Arkansas governor and GOP presidential candidate Mike Huckabee. He started-off with a real “historical” whopper:

Much of Huckabee’s speech confused identity politics with “collectivism.” It was an ideological mess. The real socialist collectivists in America are no fan of identity politics.

And it wouldn’t be a Huckabee speech without some fearmongering:

Huckabee is disappointed with students on “evangelical campuses”:

Next came Ralph Reed, one of the primary architects of the Christian Right playbook. Reed sings one note:

The “Great Awakening” was ubiquitous at this event:

We’ve written about the “Black-Robed Brigade here.

Falkirk Center’s co-founder Charlie Kirk’s pastor spoke:

A general observation about the day:

And then Eric Metaxas showed-up:

I compared this session on the “Christian mind” to Bruce Springsteen’s convocation address last night at another Christian college–Jesuit-run Boston College:

Next-up, court evangelical Greg Locke:

Next-up, the anti-social justice crowd:

At the end of a long day Eric Metaxas came back for a solo speech:

Please read my recent Religion News Service piece in this context of these texts.

A new Springsteen album is almost here

It is titled “Letter to You.” There are also rumors that a song off the album will drop tomorrow.

Here is Jay Lustig at NJArts.net:

Though there has been no official announcement, it appears that the next Bruce Springsteen album will be titled Letter to You. The page shown above is from the Amazon UK website. Though it may be taken down by the time you read this, the web address is amazon.co.uk/dp/B08HGB71RT.

A similar page was also posted today on the site of the Wheeling, W.V. record store, Nail City Records, though it has now been taken down.

There have been heavy rumors of a new Springsteen album, on its way, over the last few weeks.

Amazon UK does not list a release date through Nail City had released the date as Oct. 23. One has to wonder if the timing of the release was chosen because of the proximity of Oct. 23 to Election Day, Nov. 3.

(Update: NJArts.net has learned other details about the album, including a track listing:

“One Minute You’re Here”
“Letter to You”
“Burnin Train”
“Janey Needs a Shooter”
“Last Man Standing”
“The Power of Prayer”
“House of a Thousand Guitars”
“Rainmaker”
“If I Was the Priest”
“Ghosts”
“Song for Orphans”
“I’ll See You in My Dreams”

Read the rest here.

Tomorrow Springsteen will give the convocation speech at Boston College. Check out BC’s Born to Run reading guide. It does a very nice job of connecting Springsteen and his music to the Jesuit tradition. Here is a taste:

Springsteen focuses on the influence of the Catholic Church in his early life – geographical, cultural, familial, personal. While Springsteen acknowledges that his connection to the Church changed as he grew older, he also emphasizes the importance of his personal relationship with God. Again, with his critical reflection, Springsteen is able to articulate his faith and his belief, and how those inform his most loving response to the world: “This was the world where I found the beginnings of my song. In Catholicism, there existed the poetry, danger and darkness that reflected my imagination and my inner self. I found a land of great and harsh beauty, of fantastic stories, of unimaginable punishment and infinite reward…as a young adult I tried to make sense of it. I tried to meet its challenge for the very reasons that there are souls to lose and a kingdom of love to be gained. I laid what I’d absorbed across the hardscrabble lives of my family, friends and neighbors. I turned it into something I could grapple with, understand, something I could even find faith in. As funny as it sounds, I have a “personal relationship with Jesus… I believe deeply in his love…” (p.17).

What does spirituality mean to you? How have you matured in your
relationship with God on your journey? In what ways do you hope to do
so over the next four years at Boston College? Who are the conversation
partners you will seek out during your time at Boston College to help you
consider your relationship with God, your relationship with others and
the world around you, and your relationship with yourself?

Springsteen Will Address Boston College’s Incoming Class

springsteen netflix

Here is a taste of the Boston College press release:

Singer, songwriter, and legendary performer Bruce Springsteen, whose best-selling autobiography Born to Run provides an intimate portrait of the inner struggles and triumphs of one of America’s most beloved musical icons, will address the Class of 2024 at Boston College’s First Year Academic Convocation on September 10 in Conte Forum…

This summer, all first-year students will receive an e-copy of Springsteen’s book and a reflection guide that will help them to examine the themes raised in Born to Run—family dynamics, personal relationships, addressing adversity, and setting and fulfilling aspirations–and how they might intersect with their own lives.

“At Boston College, we have long understood from the Jesuits about the importance of engaging students in a conversation that encourages their growth intellectually, socially, and spiritually,” said Executive Director of Student Formation Michael Sacco. “The format of the conversation can vary, but the aim remains to encourage students to be attentive to their experiences and reflective of their meaning, with the hope that this will help them discern their role in the world.   

“Through his songs, Bruce Springsteen has long been such a conversation partner to his audience, masterfully portraying the American experience through lyrics that inspire reflection about our world, our families, our jobs, our struggles, and our relationships.  But in his memoir, Bruce reveals the conversation he had with himself as he approached many of his life’s crossroads.  In doing so, Bruce shares how attentiveness, contemplation, and authenticity played a key role in his personal growth and honing his immense talents. Each BC student brings a unique set of talents, and reading Bruce’s story will give them an invaluable perspective as they begin their formation at Boston College,” Sacco said.

First launched in 2004 as a formative experience and unifying event for all incoming students, the First Year Academic Convocation has featured award-winning authors ranging from Ann Patchett (Run) and Colum McCann, (Let the Great World Spin) to political leaders Barack Obama (Dreams From My Father) and John McCain (Lives of Moral Leadership).  Considered the signature academic event of freshman year, the convocation has become a beloved BC tradition that melds the University’s Jesuit, Catholic mission and heritage with its commitment to the liberal arts and formative education.

Born to Run has been lauded by critics for its frankness and eloquence, written in the authentic voice of a tenacious son of New Jersey who is considered the greatest songwriter of his generation and the poet of the American experience. NPR described the book as a “virtuoso performance,” the New York Times called it “frank and gripping,” and “intensely satisfying,” while Rolling Stone magazine described it as “an utterly unique, endlessly exhilarating, last-chance power drive of a memoir.”    

Following its release, Springsteen read from the book and shared personal reminiscences in an eight-week theatrical performance called “Springsteen on Broadway.”  His appearance at Boston College will be his first and only college visit.

“For the Class of 2024, Born to Run is a wonderful introduction to the lifelong process of discernment that is so central to the philosophy of student formation at Boston College,” said First Year Experience Director Ali Bane. “Springsteen’s memoir includes countless examples of him paying close attention to his life experiences, reflecting upon their meaning, and living in a way that translates this meaning into action to create a better world.

“Inspired by his own working-class upbringing, many of Springsteen’s songs empathize with those who have been marginalized or oppressed. First-year students will benefit greatly from reading this honest, reflective, and authentic narrative of someone who has so significantly shaped the cultural milieu of our country throughout his decades of music making.”

Read the entire release here.