Most Popular Posts of the Last Week

Here are the most popular posts of the last week at The Way of Improvement Leads Home:

  1. David Brooks: “Don’t make up your mind about Kavanaugh without reading this”
  2. Texas Social Studies Standards: Here We Go Again!
  3. Action Alert: I Teach Distorted History
  4. Pastor Greg Laurie Wrongly Tells Fellow Court Evangelicals that the United States Was “founded in a time of spiritual revival”
  5. What Franklin Graham Said About the “Private Sins” of Bill Clinton in 1998
  6. What Will Evangelicals Do if Kavanaugh’s Nomination Fails?
  7. Sam Wineburg’s Scathing Critique of the Teaching American History Grants
  8. Franklin Graham: The Blasey Ford Accusations are “Not Relevant” to Kavanaugh’s Confirmation
  9. Tweets of the Day: Merrick Garland
  10. Trump on Hurricane Florence: “One of the wettest we’ve ever seen from the standpoint of water”

 

Most Popular Posts of the Last Week

Here are the most popular posts of the last week at The Way of Improvement Leads Home:

  1.  Michael Gerson and John MacArthur on “Social Justice”
  2.  Colin Kaepernick’s Christian Faith?
  3.  Hey Ben Sasse, What About Merrick Garland?
  4.  Will Liberty University Dump Nike?
  5.  Chris King: “the case study of whether faith is a deal killer in the modern Democratic Party”
  6. Southern Baptist Pastor Cuts-Up Nike Gear During His Sermon
  7. Tweet Thread of the Day: The Historiography of American Conservatism
  8. More Politics of Fear
  9. The President Who Made it Illegal to Criticize the Presidency
  10. Would Pence Be Worse?

Most Popular Posts of the Last Week

Here are the most popular posts of the last week at The Way of Improvement Leads Home:

  1. What Does Colin Kaepernick and Nike Have to Do With a Christian College?
  2. What is Going on at Fresno Pacific University?
  3. Ben Sasse’s Speech at the Kavanaugh Hearing
  4. Hey Ben Sasse, What About Merrick Garland?
  5. The Author’s Corner with Peter Choi
  6. What Franklin Graham Said About the “Private Sins” of Bill Clinton in 1998
  7. Do the Military Academy Teams Wear Nike Gear?
  8. “I am Part of the Resistance”
  9. What Conservatives Need to Consider if the Court Overturns Roe v. Wade
  10. Court Evangelicals and “Secular Hedonism” in the Oval Office

Most Popular Posts of the Last Week

Here are the most popular posts of the last week at The Way of Improvement Leads Home

  1. Court Evangelical Eric Metaxas’s New Books is Titled Donald Drains the Swamp
  2. Tenure-Track Job Opening in the Messiah College History Department
  3. What Does the Trump Administration Mean by “Religious Freedom?”
  4. Did the President of the United States Commit a Felony?
  5. Consider Placing This Language in Your Syllabus
  6. “Falwell the Lesser”
  7. Goodbye Silent Sam
  8. What a Historian Does During Vacation
  9. “Critical Thinking” and the University
  10. Falwell Jr. Blames Cohen-Manafort Debacle on Jeff Sessions

Most Popular Posts of the Last Week

Here are the most popular posts of the last week at The Way of Improvement Leads Home:

  1. Does “Evangelical” = Trump Supporter?: Three Anecdotes from the Believe Me Book Tour
  2. What If We Counted the “Nobody” Vote?
  3. Hundreds of Priests Accused of Sex Abuse in Pennsylvania
  4. Jerry Falwell Jr.: Jeff Sessions, Rod Rosenstein, and Christopher Wray Should “Rot” in “Jail”
  5. How Did Omarosa Get a Recording Device into the Situation Room?
  6. What Franklin Graham Said About the “Private Sins” of Bill Clinton in 1998
  7. The Willow Creek Mess
  8. Warren Throckmorton is Out at Patheos
  9. What About the Left?  Aren’t They Afraid?
  10. Mark Cuban: Don’t Go to College to Study Business.  Study the Humanities

Most Popular Posts of the Last Week

Here are the most popular posts of the last week at The Way of Improvement Leads Home:

  1. The Willow Creek Mess
  2. Why We Must Challenge “Hackish History”
  3. What James Loewen Needs to Learn About History Education
  4. Churches and the Legacy of Racism: A Tale of Two Congregations
  5. What Franklin Graham Said About the “Private Sins” of Bill Clinton in 1998
  6. An Adjunct Instructor Reflects on How Much He Should Invest in the Mission of a Church-Related University
  7. Pope Francis Reminds Christians What it Means to be Pro-Life
  8. Will You Be Attending the Biennial Meeting of the Conference on Faith and History in October?
  9. Warren Throckmorton is Out at Patheos
  10. “Apparently” We are Back from Vacation

Most Popular Posts of the Last Week

Here are the most popular posts of the last week at The Way of Improvement Leads Home:

  1.  What Franklin Graham Said About the “Private Sins” of Bill Clinton in 1998
  2.  “Mark Burns, can we USE him anymore?”
  3.  Evangelical Fear in Alabama
  4. Al Mohler Pontificates on the Origins of the Culture War
  5. Is White Christian Nationalism Christian?
  6. Landmark Baptists
  7. The Author’s Corner With Molly Warsh
  8. Mark Cuban: Don’t Go to College to Study Business.  Study the Humanities
  9. Gutting Academic Books
  10. More on Ronald Reagan’s Trump-Reagan Comparison

Most Popular Posts of the Last Week

Here are the most popular posts of the last week at The Way of Improvement Leads Home:

  1. Explaining White Conservative Evangelical Support for Donald Trump in One Tweet
  2. Paula White Responds to Critics of Her Recent Comments on Immigration
  3. Mark Cuban:Don’t Go to College to Study Business.  Study the Humanities
  4. What is Happening (Again) at Taylor University?
  5. Male Authoritarianism and the Southern Baptists
  6. Hey George Will, Why Don’t You Tell Us What You REALLY Think About Donald Trump?
  7. Did Trump Commit Treason in Helsinki?
  8. The Catholic Church Criticizes the Prosperity Gospel
  9. Let’s Not Forget This Part of Yesterday’s Helsinki Press Conference
  10. More Court Evangelicals Defend Trump’s Helsinki Remarks

 

University of Michigan Historian Melissa Borja Joins “The Anxious Bench” Blog

BorjaCongratulations!

Here is a taste of Chris Gehrz’s interview with Melissa Borja:

In your two guest posts earlier this summer, you wrote about the intersection of migration and religion. What initially drew you to this field?

My fascination with the immigrant experience began with my own upbringing. My mother and father immigrated from the Philippines in 1976 and 1980, and I was born and raised in Saginaw, Michigan. Growing up as Asian American kid in Michigan in the 1980s was a complicated experience. The same year I was born, a Chinese American man named Vincent Chin was murdered in Detroit by white autoworkers. The repercussions of that event had an important impact on the Asian American community, which organized a powerful response to seek justice. It also had an enormous impact on how Asian American families like my own navigated the racial politics in our own communities, where the auto industry was a core part of the local economy and where anti-Asian hostility was on the rise as American auto-makers faced stiffer competition from Asian auto manufacturers. So, throughout my childhood, I was grappling with some of the typical questions that immigrant kids face—questions about how to negotiate being both American and Filipino—and, in addition to that, I was also trying to make sense of the reality of racism. In particular, it became clear to me from a young age that racism needed to be explored and understood beyond the black-white binary.

Like many female historians of my generation, I also owe my career path partly to the American Girl books! I absolutely loved reading the Kirsten books, which explored the experience of 19th century Swedish immigrants. Since Kirsten was also an immigrant girl in the Midwest, I felt an instant connection with her, and I even used to try to braid my hair like hers in fourth grade. But while the books encouraged me to think about immigration with a historical perspective, they also frustrated me because I knew that other histories (of Asian immigrants in particular) were not part of the Europe-centered narrative that the Kirsten books and my school textbooks  emphasized. So, I thank Kirsten for pointing me in the direction of studying history, and especially Asian American history.

I later became interested in religion in college. The terrorist attacks of September 11 occurred just as I was moving into my sophomore dorm room. At the beginning of college, I knew I was going to concentrate in history, but because of 9/11, I began thinking about religion as another fascinating and important form of social difference. A week after 9/11, I enrolled in my first religion course—a course on personal choice and global transformation, where I heard a compelling talk by the great religious historian David Hall about how scholarship about the past can be a meaningful way to intervene in the present. Later, as I grew concerned about the anti-Muslim and anti-Arab sentiment that erupted in the aftermath of 9/11, I took courses about religious pluralism with Diana Eck, and I also began to study Arabic, with the intention of eventually going to graduate school to research the religious diversity of post-1965 immigrants.

Read the entire interview here.

Most Popular Posts of the Last Week

Here are the most popular posts of the last week at The Way of Improvement Leads Home:

  1. What Happens When a Culture Warrior and Confident Pluralist Exchange Tweets About Trump’s Border Wall
  2. Mark Cuban:  Don’t Go to College to Study Business.  Study the Humanities
  3. Court Evangelical Paula White is the Latest to Use the Bible to Defend Trump’s Immigration Policy
  4. A Right Wing Pundit Gets a History Lesson
  5. Zimmerman:  The GOP Should be Careful What They Wish for in Overturning Roe v. Wade.
  6. An Evangelical Changes His Mind on Abortion
  7. The Wrong Kind of Hope
  8. The Believe Me Book Tour is Underway
  9. The Author’s Corner with Arlene Sanchez-Walsh
  10. The Court Evangelicals

Most Popular Posts of the Last Week

Here are the most popular posts of the last week at The Way of Improvement Leads Home

  1. John Wilson’s Review of Believe Me in The Hedgehog Review: A Response
  2. Evangelical Theologian Wayne Grudem Supports Trump’s Wall
  3. Did Your Church Have Patriotic Worship on Sunday?
  4. Fox News Radio Host: “Apparently There are Some So-Called Evangelical Christians Who Have a Problem with Patriotic Church Services”
  5. The Faith of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez
  6. Jared Burkholder Reviews Believe Me
  7. What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?
  8. What Franklin Graham Said About the “Private Sins” of Bill Clinton in 1998
  9. Liberty University Students Call for School to Cancel the “Trump Prophecies” Film Project
  10. Warren Throckmorton is Out at Patheos

 

 

Most Popular Posts of the Last Week

Here is the most popular posts of the last week at The Way of Improvement Leads Home:

  1. The Faith of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez
  2. The Tradition Continues at First Baptist Dallas
  3. Robert Jeffress Would Like Us to Believe He is a Historian
  4. What Has Televangelist Jim Bakker Been Doing These Days?
  5. Let’s Remember What Thomas Jefferson Thought about Religious Liberty for Muslims
  6. What Was Being Worshiped Yesterday at First Baptist Church in Dallas?
  7. My Piece at The Atlantic: “Evangelical Fear Elected Trump”
  8. The Greatest Concession Speech of All Time!
  9. Gordon Wood Reviews Stephen Brumwell’s Turncoat
  10. Politics & Prose Believe Me Event: Saturday, July 7, 2018 at 1pm

 

Most Popular Posts of the Last Week

Here are the most popular posts of the last week at The Way of Improvement Leads Home:

  1. First Baptist Dallas “Christian America” Billboard Comes Down
  2. “The Fear Sweepstakes”
  3. Robert Jeffress Rallies the Faithful for His Sermon “America is a Christian Nation”
  4. “Trump…is the logical conclusion of a conservative evangelicalism that is built on a foundation of sand”
  5. The Bible and Anti-Immigration
  6. My Latest Piece at Religion News Service: “Why aren’t most of Trump’s ‘court evangelicals’ publicly condemning his border policy?”
  7. Newt Gingrich Wants to Send Me a Copy of His New Book
  8. Some Court Evangelicals Break Ranks on Trump’s Immigration Policy
  9. Cardinal Theodore McCarrick is Removed from Public Ministry
  10. Jeff Sessions and Romans 13

 

Most Popular Posts of the Last Week

Here are the most popular posts of the last week at The Way of Improvement Leads Home:

  1. Can the Southern Baptist Convention Think of Any More Ways to Shoot Itself in the Foot?
  2. Virginia Southern Baptist Pastor: Replace Pence Speech With a Time of Prayer
  3. Black Evangelicals and the Masterpiece Cakeshop Decision
  4. More on the Paige Patterson Story from The Washington Post
  5. Jeff Sessions and Romans 13
  6. Mike Pence Will Visit the Annual Meeting of the Southern Baptist Convention
  7. Mike Pence Delivers a Trump Stump Speech at the Southern Baptist Convention
  8. The Believe Me Meme Series is Here!
  9. It’s Official: Monticello Affirms Thomas Jefferson Fathered Children with Sally Hemings
  10. Romans 13 in American History

Most Popular Posts of the Last Week

Here are the most popular posts of the last week at The Way of Improvement Leads Home:

  1. Are the Philadelphia Eagles Part of the 19%?
  2. Hey Southern Baptists: What Is Your Problem?
  3. Some Quick Thoughts on Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission
  4. Southeastern Seminary: “At this time there has been no evidence discovered that disputes or discredits our former student’s account”
  5. Will Paige Patterson Still Deliver the Keynote Sermon at the Southern Baptist Annual Meeting?
  6. Franklin Graham Calls Sanctuary Cities “just a little picture of hell”
  7. Robert Jeffress Backs Paige Patterson
  8. Paige Patterson’s Attorney Says His Client is the Victim of “wide-spread misrepresentation and misinformation”
  9. Warren Throckmorton is Out at Patheos
  10. Should InterVarsity Christian Fellowship Be Kicked Off Campus at Wayne State University?

Chris Gehrz: “Can Patheos Continue to ‘Host the Conversation on Faith’?”

Anxious-Bench-squareThis morning we highlighted Kristin Kobes Du Mez’s recent post at The Anxious Bench.  Du Mez has some serious concerns about the direction Patheos is moving.

Now Chris Gerhz, the blogmeister of The Anxious Bench, has entered the conversation.  He has similar concerns about Patheos.  Here is a taste of his post:

I hope that Patheos continues to host such a diversity of voices, across and within channels, but I think it’s fair for Kristin to ask whether Warren’s termination signals that Patheos “will be hosting a censored, invitation-only conversation? Are there topics we would do well to avoid?”

But even if we get more details and stronger reassurance, I’ve got a separate concern that’s been on my mind for several months now: that Patheos doesn’t host a conversation so much as a cacophony.

Go to www.patheos.com and you can find any number of voices speaking — but only rarely to each other. With the notable exceptions of Hart, McKnight, and Progressive blogger James McGrath, I rarely get the sense that other Patheos bloggers are all that interested in what The Anxious Bench has to say. But I’m guilty of this, too: as often as I find myself reading other Patheos blogs, I rarely write posts in response to them — whether to agree, disagree, or simply provide historical context.

Read the entire post here.

Another Patheos Blogger Wants to Know What is Going on at Patheos

Anxious-Bench-squarePatheos bloggers continue to ask questions after the website unceremoniously dumped Warren Throckmorton.

Here is a taste of historian Kristin Kobes Du Mez‘s latest post at The Anxious Bench:

Does Patheos in fact host the conversation on faith? Or is this a sign that it will be hosting a censored, invitation-only conversation? Are there topics we would do well to avoid? (To be clear, these questions are not meant to “disparage” the site, simply to inquire about its strategic objectives going forward).

As someone who writes on feminism, on Focus on the Family, on racism and Christian nationalism, on conservative Christians and sexual abuse, on #MeToo and the church, and, yes, on Donald Trump, this question is of particular interest to me. (To be clear, I’ve never received any editorial directives from Patheos leadership; Throckmorton’s removal, however, seems to have come without warning).

Beyond censorship, I suppose there’s also the question of whose pockets we’re padding. The revenue generated from the ubiquitous ads goes somewhere. I can’t imagine my blog posts contribute in any significant way to the net wealth of folks like President Trump’s personal lawyer—he has other more lucrative streams of income, I presume.

Read the entire post here.

Most Popular Posts of the Last Week

Here are the most popular posts of the last week at The Way of Improvement Leads Home:

  1. Did Paige Patterson Take Letters Dealing With an Alleged Rape from the Southeastern Seminary Archives?
  2. This Time Paige Patterson is REALLY Out at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary
  3. Warren Throckmorton is Out at Patheos
  4. What Patheos Bloggers are Saying about the Website’s Decision to Dump Warren Throckmorton
  5. Franklin Graham: Progressive?  That’s just another word for godless
  6. Alabama Religion Columnist:  “The swamp’s got nothing” on the Southern Baptist Convention
  7. As of Now, Paige Patterson Will Still Deliver the Keynote Sermon at the Annual Meeting of the Southern Baptist Convention
  8. Paige Patterson’s Former Retirement Home
  9. What Franklin Graham Said About the “Private Sins” of Bill Clinton in 1998
  10. Robert Jeffress Backs Paige Patterson

What Patheos Bloggers are Saying About the Website’s Decision to Dump Warren Throckmorton

ThrockOver at his new blog, Warren Throckmorton has collected comments from Patheos bloggers about his unceremonious removal from the religion website.

We blogged about this here and here and here.

Here is a taste of Throckmorton’s post:

Patheos blogger Fred Clark (aka Slacktivist Fred) says I may have been “Throcked.” He offers this term to describe being fired to appease far-right donors and to warn others not to anger those donors.

Whatever the reason or reasons, some Patheos bloggers have bravely taken to their Patheos blogs to criticize the move to dismiss me from the platform.  This post serves as a summary of those posts.

Read it all here.

It is Still Not Clear Why Patheos Dropped Warren Throckmorton

ThrockWe have covered this here and here.

Over at his new blog, Warren Throckmorton is still wondering why the religion website Patheos unceremoniously dropped his blog.

Here is a taste:

I feel this is important for me to say since Patheos Director of Content Phil Fox Rose sent an email to some bloggers yesterday implying that I knew their expectations “many months ago.” This email was sent to me by several Patheos bloggers:

As some of you know, Patheos decided to end its partnership with Warren Throckmorton. This was done after long and thoughtful consideration. The decision was not made based on a triggering event or post, and Mr. Throckmorton was advised of our expectations many months ago. This is not reflective of some change in policy. It was a specific case. This decision should not give any blogger reason to think their status is in question. We’re sorry the lack of details allows for speculation, but our commitment remains as always to be the place where conversation about faith is happening in the most robust and dynamic way. Nothing will change that. If you would like to discuss this further, please reach out to Ben, and I’m happy to talk too.

What were the expectations and how did I fail to meet them? Since I was not aware of any expectation relating to my blog (beyond the same agreement all other bloggers sign), I don’t know what Mr. Rose is talking about.

Read the entire post here.  Sounds like a raw deal to me.