Morning Headlines

The New York Times: “Trump Asks for Unity, but Presses Hard Line on Immigration”

The Washington Post: “In dissonant State of the Union speech, Trump seeks unity while depicting ruin”

The Wall Street Journal: “Trump Seeks to Reset Border-Wall Debate”

Harrisburg-Patriot News: “What state has the highest gas prices?”

BBC: “State of the Union: Trump announces second North Korea summit”

CNN: “Trump’s call for compromise is only on his own terms”

FOX: “Democrats unmoved by Trump’s State of the Union bid to break gridlock on border security”

Morning Headlines

The New York Times: “Trump Inaugural Committee Ordered to Hand Over Documents to Federal Investigators”

The Washington Post: “Federal prosecutors issue sweeping subpoena for documents from Trump inaugural committee, a sign of a deepening criminal probe”

The Wall Street Journal: “Trump Inaugural Committee Is Subpoenaed for Documents”

Harrisburg-Patriot News: “Christian Hackenberg’s second chance: Is Memphis his last pro stop, or is an NFL return on the horizon?

BBC: “Paris fire: Ten dead and many injured at apartment block”

CNN: “The circus singer and the Godfather of soul”

FOX: “‘Green New Deal’ details emerge, as Ocasio-Cortez preps big reveal of WW2-level mobilization” 

The Author’s Corner with Paul Musselwhite

urban dreams, rural commonwealthPaul Musselwhite is Assistant Professor of History and the Vice-Chair of the History Department at Dartmouth College. This interview is based on his new book Urban Dreams, Rural Commonwealth: The Rise of Plantation Society in the Chesapeake (University of Chicago Press, 2018).

JF: What led you to write Urban Dreams, Rural Commonwealth: The Rise of Plantation Society in the Chesapeake?

PM: As an undergraduate taking courses on medieval and early modern Europe, I became fascinated by the idea that towns and cities were miniature self-governing communes. In graduate school I decided to pursue early American history, but I wanted to know more about how that vision of the city shaped early colonialism beyond the archetypal New England town. Although I was in Virginia, I assumed that I would need to look elsewhere for examples because the scholarly literature was so adamant that the Chesapeake was completely rural. After a little digging, though, I was astonished to come across Robert Beverley Jr., the famous champion of Virginia’s early plantocracy, sponsoring an act in 1706 to establish incorporated self-governing towns across the colony, replete with guilds, markets, and provincial representation.

I quickly realized that this was the tip of the iceberg. Everywhere I looked through seventeenth-century Virginia and Maryland, people were talking about building towns—what it would achieve, how it should be done, and where others had gone wrong—and they were unmistakably drawing from the rich traditions of European chartered boroughs and self-governing cities. The Chesapeake’s rural character, which has largely been portrayed as a product of environmental determinism, suddenly appeared as an active choice made by a particular section of colonial society in response to these questions. I realized that in looking for towns, I had found some of the critical building blocks of rural plantation society.

JF: In two sentences, what is the argument of Urban Dreams, Rural Commonwealth: The Rise of Plantation Society in the Chesapeake?

PM: Our usual picture of the colonial Chesapeake is of a starkly rural society of tobacco and slavery that inhibited the development of towns and cities, but I reveal that urban development was actually one of the most hotly contested topics in the region throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. I argue that the absence of major urban places was not a product of plantation agriculture; rather, the relationship was quite the opposite, because decades of failed urban development were instrumental in forging the political structures and economic policies that facilitated big plantations in the Chesapeake and in shaping the agrarian outlook of the planter class in the new republic.

JF: Why do we need to read Urban Dreams, Rural Commonwealth: The Rise of Plantation Society in the Chesapeake?

PM: Urban Dreams will challenge the way you think about the development of the plantation system, early American urban places, and the roots of agrarian republicanism. For those interested in the relationship between slavery and the birth of capitalism, the book offers a new deep backstory, tracing the way large-scale plantations emerged in dialogue with the idea of the incorporated town just at the moment when the role of distinct urban civic communities in local market regulation was being co-opted and liberalized by the state. By exploring places that are traditionally overlooked in early American urban history, the book also argues that we have fundamentally misunderstood how contemporaries thought about cities and towns; it makes the case that urban history needs to pay closer attention to constitutional, legal, and ideological significance rather than simply counting populations or the volume of trade. Finally, Urban Dreams will also appeal to anyone interested in the roots of Jeffersonian agrarian republicanism. Historians have long searched for the reason why planters in the Chesapeake were particularly drawn to “country” ideology and classical republicanism, but they have never looked far enough back because they have mostly dismissed the seventeenth-century Chesapeake as a kind of “wild west” where pragmatism ruled. Civic republican ideas, though, were a critical part of debates over urban planning from the foundations of Jamestown, and the book uncovers planters’ gradual and conscious shift from viewing cities as the bastions of civic order to envisioning private plantations as the foundations of an agrarian republic.

JF: When and why did you decide to become an American historian?

PM: I’m an American historian because of the birth of online discount flight booking. When I was a teenager growing up in the UK, every summer my dad would scour very rudimentary websites for flights to corners of the US that didn’t normally attract British tourists, and then we would embark on mammoth road trips. That travel, especially around the South, introduced me to so many complex and contradictory facets of American society that as soon as I got to university, I signed up for early American history. From then on, I was hooked

JF: What is your next project?

PM: My new project, tentatively entitled Plantation: From Public Project to Private Enterprise, is a study of the long-noted but unexplored transformation in the meaning of “plantation” around the English empire during the seventeenth century. In the late sixteenth century, “plantation” in Ireland, Scotland, and America was predominantly understood as a process by which private individuals established new civic societies in conquered lands, but by 1700 it was widely recognized as a place of private commercial agriculture that pursued profit by exploiting enslaved laborers. The adaptation of “plantation” to describe this evolving socioeconomic system was conscious and highly significant; colonists engaged in particular forms of economic enterprise chose to call their estates “plantations” because the term allowed them to claim particular forms of authority within the imperial state and the commercial market. One particularly exciting part of this project involves building a database of the names given to plantations around the Atlantic world; I hope that tracking changing patterns in these naming practices will reveal shifts in the implicit assumptions about the social and economic structure of the plantation

JF: Thanks, Paul!

Morning Headlines

The New York Times: “Trump Calls for Keeping Troops in Iraq to Watch Iran, Possibly Upending ISIS Fight”

The Washington Post: “Northam meets with senior staff and considers options, including resignation”

The Wall Street Journal: “Virginia Governor Rebuffs Fellow Democrats, Risks Undermining Party in 2020”

Harrisburg-Patriot News: “Super Bowl 2019: Patriots take 6th NFL championship with 13-3 win over Rams”

BBC: “Venezuela crisis: European states recognise Guaido as president”

CNN: “Trump ignites new immigration furor ahead of State of the Union”

FOX: “Adam Levine breaks silence after Maroon 5’s Super Bowl Halftime Show”

Morning Headlines

The New York Times: “Trump, in Interview, Calls Wall Talks ‘Waste of Time’ and Dismisses Investigations”

The Washington Post: “Republicans seize on liberal positions to paint Democrats as radical”

The Wall Street Journal: “Employers Added 304,000 Jobs in January, More Than Expected”

Harrisburg-Patriot News: “Police officer, toddler he saved reunite after 19 years”

BBC: “Australia weather: January was hottest month on record”

CNN: “Exclusive: Trump Jr.’s mysterious calls weren’t with his father”

FOX: “Where is Baghdadi? Inside the hunt for the elusive ISIS leader, the world’s most wanted man”

The Author’s Corner with Albert Louis Zambone

daniel morgan a revolutionary life

Albert Louis Zambone is an independent historian and writer.  This interview is based on his new book Daniel Morgan: A Revolutionary Life (Westholme Publishing, 2018).

JF: What led you to write Daniel Morgan: A Revolutionary Life?

AZ:  a. I was asked to write it.

b. However, this project was a delight rather than an assignment: As a child, the first American Revolution monograph I read was Don Higginbotham’s Daniel Morgan, Revolutionary Rifleman. Higginbotham so inspired me that I persuaded my mother to make me a hunting shirt so that I could be Daniel Morgan for Halloween. I was astonished to discover that no-one knew who Daniel Morgan was.

c. I’ve long wondered how a few people were able to rise in the status-conscious, hierarchical world of colonial Virginia. When the opportunity to write about Morgan arose, I realized that he was the perfect case study of social mobility in a relatively immobile and hierarchical society.

d. I’ve always been drawn to story, and Morgan’s life is by turns sprawling, romantic, tawdry, tragic, heroic, cinematic, operatic. Once I bit into it I couldn’t let go.

JF: In two sentences, what is the argument of Daniel Morgan: A Revolutionary Life?

AZ: Daniel Morgan—by turns homeless runaway, illiterate, wagoner, brawler, literate, freeholder, plantation owner, militia captain, victorious general, Federalist Congressman, owner of immense acreage—demonstrates both that colonial America was a time of boisterous, churning possibility and that the Revolution provided yet greater possibilities that would have otherwise been unimaginable. Morgan’s life also complicates the cherished American ideal of individual self-fashioning, illustrating how community, fortune, and place shape individuals.

JF: Why should we read Daniel Morgan: A Revolutionary Life?

AZ: First, it’s a good story, since it’s based on an interesting life. Second, as historians, biographies provide us with a “lab” for testing historical hypotheses. I think Morgan’s life gives us the opportunity to examine everything from the historical geography of the Shenandoah and the status theory of elites, to the radicalism of the Revolution and the eighteenth century market revolution.

JF: When and why did you decide to become an American historian?

AZ: Probably when I was about four years old, living in Greenwich, New Jersey, the colonial village a drawing of which decorates your blog. In Greenwich, the past remains a presence, and it captivated me. More importantly, my family encouraged my interest in history, and fed it with book after book. I can barely remember a time when I wasn’t fascinated by history of all kinds, especially the history of early America. Maybe when I was three or younger—as P.G. Wodehouse said, what I was doing before then, I don’t know, just loafing I suppose. Then, for many reasons, I was first trained as European medievalist, and then left it for the history of early America. It felt like coming home—though I think that training as medievalist is the best historical training that there is, as you must interrogate sources of all kinds, learn peculiar technical, and grapple with perspectives unusually different from your own.

JF: What is your next project?

AZ: My colleague Lendol Calder and I are working together on a project that uses his “uncoverage” model of teaching history and historical thinking to create a textbook of American history. Naturally we refer to it as the “untextbook.” After that, I hope to return to thinking about colonial elites in the early American South. I’d like to focus on a family, or several families, in part to explore the change in family life over a century and a half; their cultural inculcation; and their fashioning of the surrounding society, and how it fashioned them. In the meantime, I stay busy at work on my podcast Historically Thinking, found on iTunes and all the other usual places, having conversations interesting people about the fascinating nooks of the past, and how they think about them.

JF: Thanks, Al!

Morning Headlines

The New York Times: “A Merciless Cold Lingers in the Midwest”

The Washington Post: “In latest attack on intelligence agencies, Trump ignores where they actually agree”

The Wall Street Journal: “Central Banks Signal End to Short-Lived Era of Restraint”

Harrisburg-Patriot News: “Companies to watch in 2019: Closings, bankruptcies, expansions and a designer of a ‘flying taxi’ skyport”

BBC: “Polar vortex brings deadly cold snap to US states”

CNN: “Even some Republicans balk as Trump targets US spy chiefs”

FOX: “University of Iowa student dies during polar vortex; 7 other deaths linked to wintry blast”

Introducing a New Column: “Out of the Zoo”

annieA few weeks ago we introduced Annie Thorn, a first-year history major from Kalamazoo, Michigan and our new intern here at The Way of Improvement Leads Home.  As part of her internship she will be writing a weekly column for us titled “Out of the Zoo.”  It will focus on life as a history major at a small liberal arts college.  Enjoy! –JF

This past fall semester, I joined my fellow Messiah College first-year students (mostly history majors) in a once-weekly night class that introduced us to the discipline of history. The assigned text for the class (Why Study History? by TWOILH’s own Professor Fea) argued that history is the act of reconstructing the past. We learned that as history students–and future historians–we are not responsible for procuring a long list of names and dates to commit to memory, but rather for putting flesh on the bones of the men and women who held those names and lived at those times, bringing the past to life for others to see.

I soon realized, after being introduced to this idea, that I had already been in the business of making history come alive for over a decade. No, I didn’t start reading Civil War soldiers’ diaries at the age of seven, or rifle through important documents at an archive for a fourth grade social studies project, but I did use what meager supply of knowledge I already possessed and combined it with my imagination to craft a picture of what the past might’ve been like. Spurred on by something I learned from an American Girl book, a local museum, or a PBS television show, I found joy through inserting myself into the past–it came alive to me.

I can’t quite explain why I so often entertained myself as a child by imagining what it would’ve been like growing up in 18th century Massachusetts or 14th century England rather than 21st century Michigan, but I think it has something to do with Adventures in Odyssey. My sister and I listened to cassette tapes of Adventures in Odyssey–a Focus on the Family radio show about a Soda Shop owner and inventor Mr. Whittaker–every night before going to sleep. In the show, Mr. Whittaker’s prized invention was a machine called “The Imagination Station” that could transport kids back in time and teach them about anything they could imagine–anything from the story of Moses to the Lewis and Clark expedition to the American Revolution. The Imagination Station made the past real to anyone who stepped inside. I didn’t have a machine, but I used what I did have to make the past as real to me as I could.

Now historians cannot simply replace facts with imagination–we can’t just make up what we don’t know when doing our research, even if it would be much easier that way. When studying history, it’s dangerous to make inferences based off of our own desires or experiences, rather than filling in gaps of the narrative we are constructing with historical context. If we fall into this habit, our imagination can get out of control and we risk resurrecting something akin to Frankenstein’s creature rather than an accurate depiction of the past. In moderation, though, I do think imagination remains an important tool for historians–when we use our imagination, informed by our knowledge, to walk around in the shoes of the men and women we study, the past truly comes alive.

Morning Headlines

The New York Times: “U.S. Midwest Freezes, Australia Burns: This is the Age of Weather Extremes”

The Washington Post: “Trump’s company plans to expand check of employees’ legal status following report that it hired undocumented workers for years”

The Wall Street Journal: “Federal Reserve Expected to Hold Rates Steady”

Harrisburg-Patriot News: “Polar vortex arrives in Pa.; Here’s some tips for how to cope with below-zero cold”

BBC: “Brexit: EU ‘united’ on deal as Theresa May asks for talks”

CNN: “‘Coldest air in a generation’ hits the Midwest. Officials warn of almost instant frostbite”

FOX: “$480 in gold bars prepared for loading onto Russian jet at Venezuelan airport: report”

Morning Headlines

The New York Times: “Taliban Talks Raise Question of What U.S. Withdrawal from Afghanistan Could Mean”

The Washington Post: “Justice Dept. charges Huawei with fraud, ratcheting up U.S.-China tensions”

The Wall Street Journal: “PG&E Files for Bankruptcy Following California Wildfires”

Harrisburg-Patriot News: “After eight decades, central Pa.’s largest private company is moving out of Harrisburg”

BBC: “Huawei denies wrongdoing after US criminal charges”

CNN: “Trump shows weakness as 2020 rivals emerge”

FOX: “New details of 2016 meeting with Trump dossier author conflict with Dems’ timeline”

The Author’s Corner with Randal Jelks

faith and struggle in the lives of four african americans

Randal Jelks is a Professor of American Studies and African and African American Studies at The University of Kansas. This interview is based on his new book Faith and Struggle in the Lives of Four African Americans (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019).

JF: What led you to write Faith and Struggle in the Lives of Four African Americans?

RJ: I wrote Faith and Struggle because I wanted to think through African American understandings of faiths, what their usages were, and how they reshaped the inner lives of these four historically interesting people.

JF: In two sentences, what is the argument of Faith and Struggle in the Lives of Four African Americans?

RJ: The argument of the book is quite simple. I argue that the inner lives of the personalities in this book are as consequential as their outer actions as they faced gendered racism and personal individual struggle.

JF: Why do we need to read Faith and Struggle in the Lives of Four African Americans?

RJ: I want readers to read Faith and Struggle because I want them to think about their inner lives and how their inner sense of self speaks to the times we currently live in. There are valuable lessons to be learned from others. This is why my own personal narrative is a through line all throughout the book.

JF: When and why did you decide to become an American historian?

RJ:  I was born in New Orleans. Above ground cemeteries forced me to always think about the interconnections between the past and the present. I decided on history as a methodology of inquiry as an undergraduate and have used it intellectually ever since. Professionally I became a historian when I decided to do a PhD in Comparative Black Histories at Michigan State University in 1989.

JF: What is your next project?

RJ: I am in the throes of finishing up a book titled ML: A Democratic Meditation. It is a collection of twelve essays about the current state of our polis as I think through the words of Martin Luther King, Jr. There are several more projects in the offing.  I am also an executive producer on a documentary on the writer Langston Hughes titled I, Too, Sing America: Langston Hughes Unfurled (dreamdocumentary.org).

JF: Thanks, Randal!

Morning Headlines

The New York  Times: “As Government Reopens, the New Congress Tries to Begin Again”

The Washington Post: “‘It feels like we are still hostages’: Federal contractors who lost health insurance during shutdown remain in limbo”

The Wall Street Journal: “Trump Skeptical He Would Accept Any Congressional Border Deal”

Harrisburg-Patriot News: “Restaurants in Cumberland and Perry counties with the most serious food safety violations in 2018”

BBC: “Venezuela crisis: White House ‘will respond to threats against diplomats'”

CNN: “Shutdown debacle leaves Trump with stark choices”

FOX: “Trump doubts he’d accept any deal Congress strikes for border wall”

Morning Headlines

The New York Times: “America Pushes Allies to Fight Huawei in New Arms Race with China”

The Washington Post: “‘Pelosi does not mess around’: Democratic speaker emerges triumphant from shutdown”

The Wall Street Journal: “President Trump, Day After Shutdown Ends, Says ‘We Will Build the Wall'”

Harrisburg-Patriot News: “Plans made to honor men killed in State College shooting spree”

BBC: “Trudeau fires Canada’s ambassador to China amid Huwawei controversy”

CNN: “Inside the White House, aides and advisers are despondent over a wasted month”

FOX: “Trump slams ‘one-sided’ media, says BuzzFeed, HuffPost layoffs result from ‘bad journalism'”

 

Morning Headlines

The New York Times: “Trump Signs Bill Reopening Government for 3 Weeks in Surprise Retreat from Wall”

The Washington Post: “Trump signs bill to open the government, ending the longest shutdown in history”

The Wall Street Journal: “Trump Signs Spending Bill, Ending Longest Shutdown in U.S. History”

Harrisburg-Patriot News: “Man who killed 3, himself in State College wanted to be a cop, relatives say”

BBC: “Trump backs down to end painful shutdown temporarily”

CNN: “How Nancy Pelosi broke Donald Trump”

FOX: “Trump signs bill to end partial government shutdown”

Morning Headlines

The New York Times: “Nancy Pelosi, a Woman in Control, is a Rival Who Flummoxes Trump”

The Washington Post: “Senators negotiate in hopes of ending shutdown as dueling plans fail”

The Wall Street Journal: “Shutdown Talks Revived After Senate Bills Fail”

Harrisburg-Patriot News: “Senate Democrats launch investigation of 1991 sexual misconduct claim against Sen. Daylin Leach”

BBC: “Queen makes plea for Britons to find ‘common ground'”

CNN: “No one knows how Trump plans to end the shutdown”

FOX: “Bernie Sanders acknowledges ‘economy is a disaster’ in Venezuela, as Omar accuses Trump of coup effort”

The Author’s Corner with Adriaan Neele

before jonathan edwards

Adriaan Neele is the Director of the Doctoral Program and Professor of Historical Theology at Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary. This interview is based on his new book, Before Jonathan Edwards: Sources of New England Theology (Oxford University Press, 2019).

JF: What inspired you to write Before Jonathan Edwards: Sources of New England Theology?

AN: In Before Edwards I seek to balance the recent academic attention to the developments of intellectual history after Jonathan Edwards. On the one hand, the recent rise of Edwards scholarship and eminent reflections on Edwards’s “uniqueness” in American religious history, his Puritan sermon style and substance, and the appropriation of his thought in the courses of New England theology gave me to pause to offer another study on the preacher, theologian, and philosopher of Northampton. On the other hand, the rise of another scholarship—at the same, that on Protestant scholasticism and Reformed orthodoxy of the early modern era rarely coincides with studies on Edwards but offers consideration to re-assess and re-interpret Edwards’s theological relationship to the early modern era. The publication After Jonathan Edwards: The Courses of the New England Theology by Oliver D. Crisp and Douglas A. Sweeney— “a groundbreaking study of a neglected topic,” however, became a further stimulus to embark on a more comprehensive study of providing a broader background of Edwards’s use of Reformed orthodoxy and Protestant scholastic sources in the context of the challenges of his day. The longstanding trajectories of classical Christian theology are indispensable to discern continuities and discontinuities of his theological thought.

JF: In two sentences, what is the argument of Before Jonathan Edwards: Sources of New England Theology?

AN: The theological and philosophical sources of the early modern era have contributed to Edwards’ thought through his resourceful appropriation in biblical exegesis, formulation of doctrine, polemical response, and explication of practical aspects of Christian theology.

JF: Why should we read Before Jonathan Edwards: Sources of New England Theology?

AN: This volume will present the first comprehensive study of Jonathan Edwards’s use of Reformed orthodox and Protestant scholastic primary sources in the context of the challenges of orthodoxy in his day. It will look at the way he appreciated and appropriated Reformed orthodoxy, among other topics. The book studies three time periods in Edwards’s life and work, the formative years of 1703–1725, the Northampton period of 1726–1750, and the final years of 1751–1758. A background of post-Reformation or early modern thought, but with particular attention to Petrus van Mastricht (1630-1706)—Edwards most “favored” theologian, is offered for each period enabling readers to assess issues of continuity and discontinuity, development and change in Edwards. Since there has been limited research on Edwards’s use of his primary sources this study analyses the theological ideas of the past that found their way into Edwards’s own theological reflections. The book argues that the formation, reflection, and communication of theological thought must be historically informed. The teaching, preaching, and practice of theology must be rooted in the classical curricula, methods of preaching, and systema of theology. Inherited theology must be evaluated on its own terms, historically and theologically, so that meaningful answers for the present can be constructed. Tracing Edwards’s discerning engagement with past ideas exemplifies how theology unfolds in an era of intellectual, religious, social, and political transition.

JF: When and why did you decide to become an American historian?

AN: My training in Protestant scholasticism, Reformed orthodoxy and concentration in the early modern era of ca. 1565 – 1750, and my work at the Jonathan Edwards Center at Yale University offered an opportunity to examine the writings of the sage of Northampton, and situates Edwards in a world more European, classical, and biblical-theological than the one taken for granted by most of his interpreters.

JF: What is your next project?

AN: Book: Petrus van Mastricht (1630-1706): Text, Context, and Interpretation (Vandenhoeck and Ruprecht, 2019)

Chapter: Early Modern Dutch Biblical Exegesis: Renaissance and Reception (UPenn, 2019)

Chapter: The Reception of Jonathan Edwards in Africa (OUP, 2020)

Book: The Reception of Medieval Rabbinic exegesis in Reformed Orthodoxy (2020)

Chapter: The Reception of Jonathan Edwards in the Netherlands (Palgrave, Macmillan, 2020)

Chapter: Jonathan Edwards and Prolegomena (T&T Clark, 2021)

Article: Hyleke Gockinga (1723-1793): A Woman, A Bible Commentator, and A Translator of Puritan Work in the Dutch Republic (2019)

JF: Thanks, Adriaan!

Morning Headlines

The New York Times: “Trump Says He’ll Delay Speech Until After Shutdown, as Democrats Draft Border Security Plan”

The Washington Post: “Senators hope defeat of dueling plans produces a solution to shutdown”

The Wall Street Journal: “Trump Delays State of the Union Address After Duel with Pelosi”

Harrisburg-Patriot News: “Doing your taxes? Here’s how your IRS return, and maybe your refund, will be different this year”

BBC: “Venezuela crisis: Maduro cuts ties with US after it recognizes opposition leader”

CNN: “Pelosi claims win over Trump in State of the Union showdown”

FOX: “Trump says he will give State of the Union after shutdown is over”

Morning Headlines

The New York Times: “Senate Leaders Plan Competing Bills to End Shutdown”

The Washington Post: “Hundreds of IRS employees are skipping work. That could delay tax refunds”

The Wall Street Journal: “Senate Leaders Push Votes on Dueling Bills to End Shutdown”

Harrisburg-Patriot News: “Why do people want to change their names? Here are 16 reasons”

BBC: “Zimbabwe troops accused of ‘systematic torture’ of protesters”

CNN: “With votes scheduled, Washington gropes for way out of shutdown”

FOX: “White House announces 51 judicial picks, including two for liberal Ninth Circuit”

Morning Headlines

The New York Times: “Shutdown’s Pain Cuts Deep for the Homeless and Other Vulnerable Americans”

The Washington Post: “Shutdown in U.S., slowing growth in China fuel concerns over global economy”

The Wall Street Journal: Senate to Weigh Trump’s Proposal to End Shutdown, With Passage Unlikely”

Harrisburg-Patriot News: “Why is there a pit filled with dead deer in central Pa.? The Game Commission answers”

BBC: “Taliban militants kill dozens at Afgan intelligence base”

CNN: “Twitter suspends suspicious account that helped ignite controversy over viral encounter” 

FOX: “Donald Trump Jr. compares BuzzFeed coverage to Catholic HS confrontation, says Schiff leaking”

The Author’s Corner with Richard Hughes

myths america lives by

Richard Hughes serves as the Scholar-in-Residence in the College of Bible and Ministry at Lipscomb University. This interview is based on the second edition of his book Myths America Lives By: White Supremacy and the Stories that Give Us Meaning (University of Illinois Press, 2018).

JF: What led you to write Myths America Lives By: White Supremacy and the Stories that Give Us Meaning?

RH: At the national meeting of the American Academy of Religion that convened in Chicago in 2012, I was one of five scholars who responded to James Cone’s new book, The Cross and the Lynching Tree. As part of my comments, I spoke of the five national myths that I identify in my earlier book, Myths America Lives By (Illinois, 2003), and how those myths shaped my understanding of both the nation and race when I was growing up in West Texas some sixty years ago. When I completed my remarks and took my seat at the panelists’ table, one of the panelists—the late Professor James Noel of San Francisco Theological Seminary—leaned over to me and whispered, “Professor, you left out the most important of all the American myths!” When I asked what I had omitted, he told me straight up, “The myth of white supremacy.” That simple comment launched me on quite a journey of reading, reflection, and introspection. In time I began to see Noel’s point, that even whites like me—whites who strongly resist racist ideology—can escape the power of the white supremacist myth only with extraordinary effort, if at all. That is because assumptions of white supremacy are like the very air we breathe: they surround us, envelope us, and shape us, but do so in ways we seldom discern.

JF: In two sentences, what is the argument of Myths America Lives By: White Supremacy and the Stories that Give Us Meaning?

RH: The book draws three conclusions—first, that the myth of white supremacy is the primal American myth that informs all the others; second, that one of the chief functions of the other myths is to protect and obscure the myth of white supremacy, to hide it from our awareness, and to assure us that we remain innocent after all; and third, that there is hope, but only if whites are willing to come to terms with this reality. An important sub-theme in this book is the role white churches in America have played in perpetuating the doctrine of white supremacy since the birth of the nation—and especially now

JF: Why do we need to read Myths America Lives By: White Supremacy and the Stories that Give Us Meaning?

RH: As far as I know, no other book systematically explores the mythic structure of American identity and roots that mythic structure squarely in the myth of white supremacy.

JF: When and why did you decide to become an American historian?

RH: I was raised in a very narrow, sectarian Christian tradition that claimed to be the one true church. My deeply held, existential questions about those claims first led me into the history of American religion. In time I saw unmistakable parallels between the sectarian dimensions of my church and the sectarian dimensions of my nation, and the mythic structures that sustained both

JF: What is your next project?

RH: Sidney E. Mead was widely recognized as the dean of historians of American religion and was my teacher at the University of Iowa. Mead always claimed that the Enlightenment stood at the heart of the American experience. Much later, a group of evangelical historians placed American evangelicalism at the heart of the American experience. I want to do a project that compares the work of Mead and the work of the evangelical historians on the way those two traditions helped shape the American experience.

JF:  Thanks, Richard!