Jonathan Turley: Trump WAS Impeached

Trump impeachment

Was Trump impeached?

Last weekend Harvard Law professor Noah Feldman argued that Donald Trump will not be officially impeached until the House transmits the articles of impeachment to the Senate.

Jonathan Turley disagrees.

Some of you may remember Turley.  He is the George Washington University law professor who argued before the House Judiciary Committee on December 4, 2019 that there was not enough evidence to impeach Donald Trump. (The other three law professors called to testify–Pamela Karlan of Stanford, Michael Gerhardt of UNC-Chapel Hill, and Feldman–argued that Trump’s phone call to Ukrainian president Zelinsky was an impeachable offense).

In a recent Washington Post op-ed titled “I testified against Trump’s impeachment. But let’s not pretend it didn’t happen,” Turley writes:

Last Saturday in West Palm Beach, Fla., in remarks to a group of young supporters, President Trump road-tested a talking point that appeared to be aimed at changing the narrative around his December impeachment: “You had no crime. Even their people said there was no crime,” he said of congressional Democrats, before adding: “In fact, there’s no impeachment. There’s no — their own lawyers said there’s no impeachment.”

Trump was clearly baiting House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) after she refused to send her chamber’s two just-passed articles of impeachment to the Senate before leaving town for the holidays. The move caused something of a stalemate with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and precipitated a curious debate about whether Trump is actually impeached. It’s unclear what Pelosi and McConnell may do in their game of constitutional chicken between now and when the House reconvenes in January, but one thing is clear: Trump was impeached.

As I testified earlier this month before the House Judiciary Committee, I was opposed to this impeachment. While I said that this president could be legitimately impeached on these two articles, abuse of power and obstruction of Congress (while rejecting other potential articles like bribery), the record is the thinnest of any modern impeachment to go to the Senate, which could result in a trial as cursory as its investigation. Trump’s suggestion that he remains unimpeached appears based on a theory recently floated by my colleague, Harvard Law School’s Noah Feldman, that “Trump Isn’t Impeached Until the House Tells the Senate.” But while this theory may provide tweet-ready fodder for the president to defend himself and taunt his political adversaries, it’s difficult to sustain on the text or history or logic of the Constitution.

Read the rest here.