A Citizen’s Guide to Impeachment

 

Impeachment trial

Confused about impeachment?  Not sure how it all works? Need a primer? Check out Cumberland University history professor Mark Cheathem‘s piece at The Tennessean.

Here is a taste:

The ongoing impeachment process has understandably caused anxiety among Americans.

Some think the process has been rushed and imperfectly investigated, while others believe that it is an attempt to influence next year’s presidential election. Understanding both the constitutional origins of impeachment and the reasons for previous impeachment proceedings should help alleviate these concerns.

Presidential impeachment is discussed in three different sections of the U.S. Constitution. Article 2, Section 4 states that a president “shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.” The vague phrase “high crimes and misdemeanors” is confusing, but constitutional experts generally agree that while criminal activity can fall under this provision, actions that would not warrant indictment under the criminal code can also be reasons to impeach a president

The impeachment process itself is broadly outlined in Article 1, Sections 2 and 3, of the Constitution. Section 2 gives the U.S. House of Representatives “the sole Power of Impeachment.” The House essentially serves as the grand jury, deciding whether or not to indict the president. A simple majority vote on even one article means that the president has been impeached.

Section 3 directs the U.S. Senate to oversee the trial portion of the impeachment process. The Senate is charged with deciding whether to remove the president from office based on the impeachment article(s) passed by the House. The chief justice of the Supreme Court presides over this trial. If two-thirds of the Senate vote to convict the president of even one impeachment article, then the president is removed from office. They are also disqualified from “hold[ing] and enjoy[ing] any Office of honor, Trust or Profit under the United States” and are still “liable and subject to Indictment, Trial, Judgment and Punishment, according to Law.”

Read the rest here.