Is There a Relationship Between Christian Nationalism and White Supremacy?

116071867.jpg

Two reporters contacted me this week to talk about Christian nationalism and the shootings in El Paso and Dayton.  I told both of them that Christian nationalism does not necessarily have to result in white supremacy.  As I argued in Was America Founded as a Christian Nation?, much of the civil rights movement and the social gospel movement believed that the United States was a Christian nation.  The abolitionists and social reformers of 19th century believed that the United States was a Christian nation.  (Of course their understanding what it means to be a “Christian nation” looked very different from the current manifestation of Christian nationalism espoused by the Christian Right).  It is also true that throughout American history Christian nationalism fueled white supremacist groups such as the KKK and the Confederacy.

The first reporter I engaged was Carol Kuruvilla of HuffPost.  Here is a taste of her piece, “How a Nationalist Strain of Christianity Is Subtly Shaping America’s Gun Debate“:

“For Christian nationalists, human attempts to fix social problems (like gun control legislation) without addressing the underlying ‘moral decline’ of the nation are misguided and an affront to the Christian God,” [Clemson sociologist Andrew] Whitehead said. 

John Fea, a historian at Messiah College who studies Christian nationalism, said that this belief is evident in how some of Trump’s top evangelical advisors responded to the recent mass shootings. 

Pastor Greg Laurie, who leads the evangelical Harvest Christian Fellowship in Riverside, Calif., and Pastor Jack Graham, of Prestonwood Baptist Church in Plano, Texas, taped an Instagram video on Sunday where they talked about how “something bigger” was at play: Rather than blame the availability of guns, the pastors claim that what happened in Dayton and El Paso was the result of a “spiritual battle.”

“The Bible tells us that the final hours of human history, that perilous times will come, difficult, dangerous times will come,” Graham said in the video. “Not to minimize what’s happened, because it’s a tragedy … But we need to remember that ultimately, it’s a spiritual solution. We can’t politicize this.” 

“Many evangelicals, not just Christian nationalists, indeed believe that the *real* problem is a spiritual one. In order to solve the gun problem in America we must evangelize more,” Fea told HuffPost in an email. “By saying that ‘we can’t politicize’ this, [Laurie] and Graham are sending a message to their followers that gun control will not help these problems.”

And my conclusion:

“I cannot think of anything that would make them open to gun control measures,” he wrote. Christian nationalists believe “these are rights that are ENSHRINED in the Constitution by God.”

Read the entire piece here.

And here is a taste of Micah Danney’s piece at Religion Unplugged: “What is Christian Nationalism? Shootings Spark Renewed Debate“:

If the debate about what Christian nationalism is, or whether it exists, inevitably leads to the intent of the country’s founding, history doesn’t uncomplicate things. John Fea, a historian at Messiah College, wrote the book Was America Founded as a Christian Nation?

“It’s a complicated question, but largely it’s a very hard case to make that the founding fathers of this country wanted to privilege Christianity over all other religions,” Fea said.

Demographically, Christianity certainly was dominant well into the 19th century, and it did shape the culture, he said. It is still the largest religion. Yet legal bulwarks against its codification in public life were part of the nation’s founding. The First Amendment is clear that there is to be no established religion, and Article 5 of the Constitution prohibits any religious test for those serving in government. 

Richard Gamble, a historian at Hillsdale College, said opposing views of Christianity’s role in public life actually share a key characteristic. “Both sides of the debate have understandings of Christianity that are very politicized,” he said.

What used to be a debate about how churches engage in politics has given way to a broad consensus that churches must take an active role in society. Historically, there was a louder argument for staying focused on maintaining religious traditions. 

Read the entire piece here.

3 thoughts on “Is There a Relationship Between Christian Nationalism and White Supremacy?

  1. Unicorn,

    Your stroll through Orange County and related history in the 1980s was interesting, but you left me scratching my head about what that has to do with Christian Nationalism. Shouldn’t you have placed your observations within a Christian broadcasting or a prophecy context?

    James

    Like

  2. Familiar name from my time in-country:

    Pastor Greg Laurie, who leads the evangelical Harvest Christian Fellowship in Riverside, Calif…

    When I was listening to Christianese AM radio in the Eighties, PastorGregLaurie (all one word) got a LOT of air time for the Vineyard (which I believe was then located in a former Federated Stereo big-box store on Anaheim Blvd between Ball Road and I-5). In a radio environment DOMINATED by Calvary Chapels (PastorChuckSmithCalvaryChapelCostaMesa, PastorRaulReesCalvaryChapelWestCovina, etc). As in a couple hours of back-to-back Calvary Chapel programs. PastorGregLaurieVineyard was one of them in the back-to-back block and I have always assumed he was Calvary Chapel or close enough as made no difference. (In SoCal of the time, “Nondenominational” and/or “Christian Fellowship” without any adjectives usually meant “Calvary Chapel or Calvary Chapel Clone”, Fundagelical with “Moses Model” pastor/dictator.)

    Vineyard was best known for hosting an annual “Harvest” CCM concert festival in local major venues (like Anaheim Stadium); I remember it being plugged on Eighties Christianese AM radio and to this day ad posters for Harvest (with Greg Laurie’s name attached) show up on all the bus stops & Metrolink stations every year.

    “The Bible tells us that the final hours of human history, that perilous times will come, difficult, dangerous times will come,” Graham said in the video. “Not to minimize what’s happened, because it’s a tragedy … But we need to remember that ultimately, it’s a spiritual solution. We can’t politicize this.”

    Note that Calvary Chapel and all its clones were infamous for Rapture Ready End Times Prophecy Mania. (I know this from personal experience.) As in “We May Not Have a 1978!!! Or Even a 1977!!!!!” Rapture-it is.

    Like

  3. I’ve been thinking and reading about this question this week. It’s clear that the self-conscious “white supremacist” movement (alt.right, far right, neo-nazi or whatever label) espouses a set of ideas that both overlap and diverge from either mainstream conservative nationalism, or its Christian nationalist variant. A big divergence with Christian nationalism is their relative insouciance toward Christianity, and the somewhat libertarian tack on morality. Conversely, although critics rightly locate Christian nationalism within the broader context and history of white hegemony, I think it would be misleading to simply call every Christian nationalist a white supremacist, if that is meant to imply they are exactly the same as those who hang on on 8chan, or support the AfD.

    Some research suggests the older generation of far right proponents tend to be closer toward a mainstream nationalism (i.e. it’s America that is Great), whereas the younger generation are more self consciously eager to break up America into ethno-states, or form a pan-national white federation (a kind of white caliphate). The older generation can still support America as America because they remember it from a time when socially and legally it was institutionally a “white supremacist” country. White supremacy in this context didn’t have to be argued for, it was the default.

    However, I was kind of shocked (though should not have been) by my reading about how many alt.right ideas I’ve heard espoused in the Christian conservative mainstream, including among students, suggesting that the more radical elements of the far right are changing the discourse of “mainstream” Christian nationalism as the generations roll on. I wonder if there is anyone doing/proposing studies about prevalence of alt.right ideas on CCCU campuses…..

    Liked by 2 people

Comments are closed.