Commonplace Book #129

Though he remained an invalid for the rest of his life, [Emanuel] Carnevali continued writing in English, taking backward glances at his American experience.  One of his poems, written as he approached his native land, bespeaks his ambivalent feelings and those of many another immigrant toward both Italy and America.  “In America,” he wrote,

. . . everything

Is bigger, but less majestic. . .

Italy is a little family:

America is an orphan

Independent and arrogant, 

Crazy and sublime,

Without tradition to guide her,

Rushing headlong in a mad run which she calls

Progress

American cities, he continues, are mechanical; “in their hurry, people forget to love and be kind.  Immigrants are hungry not only for bread but for people, but America you gather the hungry people/And give them new hungers for the old ones.”

Jerry Mangione and Ben Morreale, La Storia: Five Centures of the Italian American Experience, 361-362.

 

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