Commonplace Book #126

…Others, however, were invigorated by New York.  Arriving in the city at the age of fifteen, Pascal D’Angelo was startled, then entranced, by the spectacle of an elevated train dashing around a curve.  “To my surprise not even on car fell.  Nor did the people walking beneath scurry away as it approached.'” Minutes late, while riding a trolley, he was distracted by the sight of a father and son moving their mouths in continuous motion ‘like cows chewing on cud.’  Never having known of chewing gum, he assumed, ‘with compassion, that father and son were both afflicted with some nervous disease.’  Later, just before he and his immigrant companions reached their destination, he was surprised to note signs at street with “Ave., Ave., Ave.’ printed on them.  “How religious a place this must be that expressed its devotion at every crossing,” he mused, though he could not understand why the word was not followed by “Maria.”

Gerre Mangione and Ben Morreale, La Storia: Five Centures of the Italian American Experience, 125.