Yellow Fever Hits Philadelphia, 1793

High Street

Here is a taste of historian Billy Smith‘s article in the Spring 2019 issue of Pennsylvania Legacies on the Philadelphia yellow fever epidemic

“They are dying on our right hand and on our Left; we have it opposite us, in fact, all around us, great are the number that are called to the grave…To see the hearse go by is now so common that we hardly take notice of it;…we live in the midst of death.” While Isaac Heston penned these words to his brother on September 19, 1793, yellow fever claimed the lives of about 70 Philadelphians each day. “When I see the Metropolis of the United States depopulated,” the 22-year-old moaned, “it is too distressing and affecting a scene for a person young in Life to bear.” A mosquito carrying the virus bit Heston about the time he wrote the letter; he died 10 days later.

It all started in late July 1793 in a brothel near a pier in the northern part of the city. Two mariners, mostly likely from the ship Hankey or one of the other vessels that had arrived a few days earlier from the West Indies, had rented a room at the “disorderly house.” A violent fever quickly killed one of the sailors. An English boarder in the house shivered with an elevated temperature, vomited a black substance, and died a few days later. Mrs. Parkinson, an Irish lodger (or prostitute), suffered with sunken eyes, jaundiced skin, and blood trickling from her nose and mouth for a week before she expired. Both brothel owners died, as did the second mariner and several next-door neighbors. 

All these fatalities in such a brief time attracted the attention of Dr. Benjamin Rush, the most distinguished physician in the new nation. After visiting a few of the sick people in the neighborhood, he announced in late August that yellow fever now stalked the city’s streets. During the next three months, the disease killed more than 5,000 people—one out of every 10 Philadelphia residents. Not until the late 19th century did physicians understand that infected Aedes aegypti mosquitoes were the source of all this human misery. 

Read the rest at the blog of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

One thought on “Yellow Fever Hits Philadelphia, 1793

  1. Yes, Philadelphia was a very sick city just about every summer. Folks like the John Adams knew to skip town and not consider returning until the first frost, though they didn’t quite get the tie to the mosquitoes.
    But fortunately the politicians already had the plan (for political reasons, not health) to move the capital from the fairly wet, prolific mosquito area of Philadelphia to the muddy, warmer, swamp along the Potomac River!

    Like

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