Russell Shorto on “Revolution Song”

Shorto bookWriter and historian Russell Shorto‘s new book is Revolution Song: A Story of American Freedom.  Here is a description:

In his epic new book, Russell Shorto takes us back to the founding of the American nation, drawing on diaries, letters and autobiographies to flesh out six lives that cast the era in a fresh new light. They include an African man who freed himself and his family from slavery, a rebellious young woman who abandoned her abusive husband to chart her own course and a certain Mr. Washington, who was admired for his social graces but harshly criticized for his often-disastrous military strategy.

Through these lives we understand that the revolution was fought over the meaning of individual freedom, a philosophical idea that became a force for violent change. A powerful narrative and a brilliant defense of American values, Revolution Song makes the compelling case that the American Revolution is still being fought today and that its ideals are worth defending.

Over at the DesMoines Register, Shorto answers a few questions about the book.  Here is a taste of the interview:

You are known for your Dutch histories. How did you come up with the idea for “Revolution Song”?

 

Yes, my intellectual heart is in the Netherlands in the 1600s and what fascinates me about that time is that’s when you have people beginning to look into microscopes and telescopes and see that the world is not necessarily the way it was told to them by the church or by the state.

So they begin to come up with a new formulation of knowledge based on reason, and reason is something that applies to all. We all have this curious thing in our veins, and I was fascinated by how that led people, as this nation spread out, to come up with new demands based on the primacy of the individual. You see leaders in America take this great wave of interest in individual freedom and begin to focus it on their political separation.

Read the entire piece here.

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