Is Freedom a Biblical Concept?

Liberty

Earlier today I posted a piece from Rod Dreher’s blog about patriotic worship.  At the end of the piece I was struck by Dreher’s “update” in which he published a message he received from one of his readers.  Here it is:

“Freedom” is not a Bible concept. Nowhere are we exhorted to throw off oppression and liberate ourselves. To the contrary, the Jews were under real oppression at the time of Christ, and he told them to pay taxes to Caesar and obey a soldier’s command to carry his pack. There were many revolutionary bands at the time, men who could not bear the Roman oppression who were determined to fight for independence. And Jesus never supported them or their cause. He really did have no kingdom in this world. The Apostles failed to get this so consistently that even at the Ascension they asked, “Will you at this time restore the fortunes of Israel?” He didn’t. He had no stake in whether Israel was enslaved or free.

This huge emotional connection between throwing off the British yoke, and being grateful for our beautiful country, all there is to legitimately celebrate and express thanks to God for–between that, and the core teaching and message of Christianity, is false.

“Freedom” is not a Biblical concept, but it’s a capitalist concept–it keeps us “free” to choose teal or autumn gold, leather or aluminum, etc, all those tiny forced choices that really are no choice, as Matthew Crawford says. But it feels “free,” and we enjoy the choosing so much, that we emotionally link it with our faith. Bah humbug.

Interesting.  There were many Loyalists in America during the age of the American Revolution who made a similar arguments.

Don’t get me wrong, I think freedom, and particularly religious freedom, can be rooted in a Christian view of human dignity.  But when I hear my fellow evangelicals talk about “religious freedom” it often sounds like a baptized version of American individualism. Rights and freedoms must always be understood in relationship to the common good. Yet many evangelicals understand religious liberty solely in terms of protection against the potential of government interference with their right to make political statements from the pulpit.  True religious “freedom” also comes with duty, service, and care for others and the creation.  I know many evangelicals believe this, but how come they never frame things this way?

Thoughts on this?

4 thoughts on “Is Freedom a Biblical Concept?

  1. Yes, completely agree. Western/Lockean freedom is not Christian freedom. Ironically, it leads to exactly the kind of “liberal” attitudes that “conservatives” rant against. American Evangelicals seem to feel that fighting for religious freedom is a Gospel mandate But. I think the slippage between Christian freedom and Enlightenemnt-secular politcial/civic liberty is one factor that has helped create the fusion between Evangelicalism and American Civic Evangelicalism.

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    • Absolutely, Doug. Of course the Bible says a lot about freedom in this regard. By the way, Galatians 5 was regularly used by patriots to justify their political revolution. Interesting twist of scripture.

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