Saying Grace

Saying_grace_before_carving_the_turkey_at_Thanksgiving_dinner_8d10749v

via Wikipedia Commons

According to a recent study by the Washington Post and the Kaiser Family Foundation, half of all Americans pray before meals.  Sarah Pulliam Bailey, Julie Zauzmer, and Emily Guskin tell us more at The Post:

A new poll by The Washington Post and the Kaiser Family Foundation finds that saying grace is a widespread practice in the United States. About half of all Americans take a minute to say a prayer over their food at least a few times a week, the poll reveals, making grace an unusual commonality in a politically divided nation.

Rural and urban Americans are equally likely to say grace, the poll shows. Northerners and Southerners, Catholics and Protestants, Democrats and Republicans, all say grace to varying degrees. Even some Americans who reject organized religion still say grace.

“It’s a powerful way of reminding yourself that you are not self-sufficient, that you are living by somebody’s grace, that plenty of other people who work just as hard as you don’t have anything to eat,” said Tim Keller, a prominent New York City pastor who wrote a book on prayer.

Keller said the physical act of bowing heads, closing eyes and folding hands is an important exercise in gratitude for people of many faiths, from childhood on up.

Read the entire piece here.