Donald Trump Will Be Bringing a 1,400 Pound Block of Cheese to the White House Next Week

Trump Jackson

Just kidding. I think the kids call that “click bait.”

Everyone seems to writing about Andrew Jackson this week.  Do you think it might have something to do with the fact that Donald Trump visited his grave the other day? 🙂 (And by the way, click here to learn more about the cheese story).

Michael Gerson devoted his most recent column at The Washington Post to Trump’s fascination with the 7th POTUS.

Jamelle Bouie reflects on Jackson and Trump here.

Here is David S. Reynolds at CNN:

When President Donald Trump laid a wreath Wednesday at Andrew Jackson’s grave in Nashville, he paid homage to a president whose mantle as a populist hero he is trying to wear. Does he deserve the honor?

There are, to be sure, similarities between Jackson and Trump.

Trump succeeding Barack Obama resembles Jackson taking over from John Quincy Adams. In both cases, a populist president followed a cerebral one. Adams, like Obama, enjoyed reading books. Adams graduated second in his class at Harvard and read widely on all kinds of subjects, from science to history. He engaged in careful discussion of political issues, as does Obama.
 
Jackson, by contrast, had little time for books — so little, according to contemporary biographer James Parton, that the only book besides the Bible that Jackson read all the way through was “The Vicar of Wakefield,” a novel by Oliver Goldsmith. Trump, likewise, prefers bullet points to books and tweets to discussion.

They also shared a near-obsession with the media. A curator at the Hermitage, Jackson’s home, explained to Trump during his visit that Jackson subscribed to over a dozen newspapers and made notes on what he liked and what he disagreed with. One one editorial he found particularly irksome, Jackson drew a big black X, the curator said. “We know that feeling, we know that feeling,” Trump responded.

Jackson anticipated today’s anti-intellectualism, epitomized by Trump, who has — among other things — rejected the science behind climate change. His science denial was matched by Jackson, who, according to his private secretary Nicholas Trist, reportedly told a family member that he didn’t believe the Earth was round.

But, like Trump, Jackson spoke the language of everyday Americans, who went delirious in his presence. When Jackson was elected to a second term in 1832 by a tremendous margin, a politician of the time said, “My opinion is that he may be President for life if he chooses.”

Read the entire piece here.