*Scientific American* Magazine: “Politicians trying to dump humanities education will hobble our economy”

science-vs-humanitiesGlad to see the editors of Scientific American, the oldest continually published magazine in the United States, defend the humanities.  Here is a taste of the editorial “STEM Education is Vital, but Not at the Expense of the Liberal Arts“:

Kentucky governor Matt Bevin wants students majoring in electrical engineering to receive state subsidies for their education but doesn’t want to support those who study subjects such as French literature. Bevin is not alone in trying to nudge higher education toward course work that promotes better future job prospects. Senator Marco Rubio of Florida, a former presidential candidate, put it bluntly last year by calling for more welders and fewer philosophers.

Promoting science and technology education to the exclusion of the humanities may seem like a good idea, but it is deeply misguided. Scientific American has always been an ardent supporter of teaching STEM: science, technology, engineering and mathematics. But studying the interaction of genes or engaging in a graduate-level project to develop software for self-driving cars should not edge out majoring in the classics or art history.

Read the entire piece here.

One thought on “*Scientific American* Magazine: “Politicians trying to dump humanities education will hobble our economy”

  1. Promoting science and technology education to the exclusion of the humanities

    This discussion always seems to begin with this false premise. One can and should get plenty of liberal arts courses on the way to a STEM major degree.

    The other question is what duty the state [and thus the taxpayer] owes an 18-yr-old adult as far as an education. That we should invest in our young is fairly agreed upon, but it’s not unfair we should have some say in the investment:The object–and duty to our young–is education not as an end in itself but as a means for that person to be able to earn a living and provide for himself and hopefully a family.

    If that seems coldly utilitarian, so be it. The state is in the utility business.

    Like

Comments are closed.