The New York-Virginia Connection in the History of American Politics

Kaine and Clinton

Manisha Sinha, who has moved on from the University of Massachusetts to become the Draper Chair in American History at the University of Connecticut, has turned to the New York Daily News to remind us that the Hillary Clinton-Tim Kaine Democratic ticket is yet another chapter in a longstanding New York-Virginia political alliance.

Here is a taste:

The Democratic Party nomination of Hillary Clinton of New York for President and Tim Kaine of Virginia for vice president is historic — and not just because a woman for the first time in American history heads the ticket of a major party.

The political alliance Clinton-Kaine represents is as old as the American Republic itself: The Empire State and the Commonwealth of Virginia have played starring roles in American history since the country’s founding.

The first party system, Hamiltonian Federalists versus the Jeffersonian Republicans, involved towering figures from both states. The father of the nation, George Washington, and the influential fourth chief justice of the Supreme Court, John Marshall, were staunch Federalists and Virginians.

The architect of the Federalist national bank and currency was Alexander Hamilton of New York. Washington took the oath of office in New York.

The “Revolution of 1800,” which brought Thomas Jefferson to the presidency, was masterminded by Jefferson and his Virginia ally James Madison. Along with Hamilton and John Jay of New York, Madison authored the Federalist Papers, which argued for a strong federal government and paved the way for the U.S. Constitution. Jefferson and Madison, followed by James Monroe, would cement the hold of the so-called Virginia Dynasty on the presidency, and won the political battle over Hamilton and the Federalists even while adopting many features of their program.

Read the rest here.

Also check out our interview with Sinha at The Author’s Corner.  We talked about her recent book The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition.