Top Tweeters from the OAH Meeting in San Francisco

It’s almost like being there…

In no particular order with a representative tweet included:

History News NetworkEric Foner: I don’t think the 14th Amendment could be ratified *today*, so let’s not underestimate impact of Reconstruction

Samuel Redman: Academic historians tend to emphasize analysis, theory, and tough questions. NPS generally emphasizes story and narrative in programming.

Mark Robertson: The discussion ranged far beyond their subjects into social activism and the role of historians in society.

Alexis Coe:  “It wasn’t in the archives” and “It didn’t factor in” are disappointing answers from really good historians

Dianne M. SommervilleFoner took issue with hd history teacher who said Reconstruction Act worst law in Am hist. No, Foner said, Alien & Sedition Act

OAH: Nancy Cott, University, chosen OAH President-Elect

Suzanne Fischer:  These are great papers, but what’s with this reading of papers and no pictures? All these pamphlet/alt press sources are important

Adam Arenson how, online, the research never ends – book has more interactive post-publication life

2 thoughts on “Top Tweeters from the OAH Meeting in San Francisco

  1. Alexis Coe ‏@Alexis_Coe 8h
    “It wasn't in the archives” and “It didn't factor in” are disappointing answers from really good historians #oah2013 #race #gender
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    Alexis Coe ‏@Alexis_Coe 8h
    Questions consistently asked at panels on politics: What about race? At panels on race: What about gender? #oah2013

    What about it, Alexis?

    The question is what is history and what's forensic anthropology. What of transexual Albanian Rastafarians? [I smell a doctoral thesis here.]

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  2. Eric Foner: I don't think the 14th Amendment could be ratified *today*

    Knowing what Living Constitutionalism would do to it? Damn right, Brother Foner, Brother Fea. Forget textualism, trying to understand the original meaning of the words. That's a quaint point these days.

    Living Constitutionalism is a method of constitutional interpretation that didn't even exist when the 14th Amendment was ratified.

    So let's forget this “social contract” BS, holding each other to the letter of the law—we've changed the spirit of the law too.

    What is left? Romans 13? Obey your government, slaves obey your masters?

    [Under Romans 13, we'd still have slavery, you know…]

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