Jill Lepore: Microhistorian

Over at Dissent, Francesca Mari (associate editor of Texas Monthly) reviews two collections of essays by Harvard history professor Jill Lepore: The Mansion of Happiness: A History of Life and Death and The Story of America: Essays on Origins.  (The essays in these volumes originally appeared in The New Yorker). Mari uses the review to reflect on the genre of microhistory, a style of history writing that Lepore has raised to an art form. 

Here is a taste:

In The Story of America’s introduction, Lepore says that she joined The New Yorker because she “wanted to learn how to tell stories better,” which is sort of like saying one wanted to hike Mt. Kilimanjaro to learn how to walk. But, indeed, the success of a microhistory is very much about storytelling, and rests on strengths not always prioritized in academia—a sensitivity to character and idiosyncratic detail, an ability to amplify the plot turns in a life or an idea while letting go of those that are unimportant. To wit, Lepore writes a whole essay about Samuel Eliot Morison, “the last Harvard historian to ride a horse to work,” who, “once interrupted at his desk by the incessant barking of a neighbor’s dog, went outside and shot it.” While some academics might think such a detail a barking distraction from their larger argument, Lepore recognizes that it is often the detail that pegs a person’s character but also that triggers an epiphany.

3 thoughts on “Jill Lepore: Microhistorian

  1. There you have it, folks. Another piece of microhistory, this time of the anti-Tea Party side.

    Courteous, intelligent, nice people, doncha think. Research done, now I can write the book.

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  2. No, she got it right. The Tea Party is nothing more than a dying populist movement. Their version of American History is a travesty. I say good riddance to the Teabaggers!

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  3. To wit, Lepore writes a whole essay about Samuel Eliot Morison, “the last Harvard historian to ride a horse to work,” who, “once interrupted at his desk by the incessant barking of a neighbor’s dog, went outside and shot it.” While some academics might think such a detail a barking distraction from their larger argument, Lepore recognizes that it is often the detail that pegs a person’s character but also that triggers an epiphany.

    It can be fine for biography, that each piece contains the whole. But Jill Lapore's

    The Whites of Their Eyes: The Tea Party's Revolution and the Battle over American History (The Public Square)

    was journalistic hackery, not legitimate scholarship. Microhistory my ass. In any collection of human beings, anybody can find anything they want to find, for good or ill.

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