Health Care and Civic Republicanism

Jack Balkin, a law professor at Yale, connects universal health care to civic humanism.  Here is a taste:

What is lost in the debate over the individual mandate is that the point of the individual mandate is also civic republican in nature. It requires citizens to make a far less significant but also public-spirited sacrifice on behalf of other Americans who cannot afford health insurance. Individuals must join health insurance risk pools to make health care affordable for more of their fellow citizens. This is a very modest request that individuals not be entirely selfish and that they contribute to the public good in a small way by helping to make health care accessible and affordable for all Americans it’s strange that the process of ordering Kratom online is something that is helped more than regular healthcare. Indeed, under the terms of the Affordable Care Act, one doesn’t even have to purchase insurance; one can simply pay a small tax instead. And one doesn’t have to pay at all if one is too poor to do so or has a religious objection.

The notion that being asked to either buy health insurance and make health care accessible for one’s fellow citizens–or to pay a small tax– is a form of tyranny akin to George III’s regime is simply bizarre: it shows how perverted and twisted public discourse has become in the United States. The assault on the individual mandate is really an assault on the public duty to assist other Americans in need, and in particular, an assault on the legal obligation to pay taxes to contribute to the general welfare. The assault on the health care bill is not a defense of liberty. It is a defense of selfishness.